Buy Used
£2.80
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Oracle8 Design Using UML Object Modeling Paperback – 1 Sep 1998

4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£34.13 £0.01

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Osborne/McGraw-Hill (1 Sept. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0078824745
  • ISBN-13: 978-0078824746
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 18.7 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,629,863 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Author

Unique blend of logical + physical database design concepts
In writing this book, we had two goals. First, we tried to cover a broad range of data modeling topics from the basics to advanced modeling techniques including recursion and generic modeling. But, this is not just a theoretical book. Equal attention is given to database design issues. We have included the topics of table design, naming conventions, and datatype domains. In addition, the book discusses Oracle8 relational and object-relational design in detail, including sample relational as well as object-relational SQL code for every concept presented.

This combination of logical and physical database design topics is what makes the book unique. In our company, Dulcian, Inc., we have designed and implemented many database systems. In Oracle8 Design Using UML Object Modeling, we have distilled our theoretical philosophy of database design as well as including practical information about how we implement these designs in real world systems.

Over the last few years, there has been a steady movement towards generic, object-oriented techniques in database design. Simultaneously, the Unified Modeling Language (UML) has emerged as the standard for object-oriented analysis and design. Therefore all modeling examples are shown using both traditional Entity Relationship Diagrams (ERDs) and UML.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I am often disappointed with technical books because they lack the practical advice that I need to get my job done. This is definitely not the case with Dorsey and Hudicka's book on Oracle 8 Object modeling with UML.
The authors have provided Oracle Developers and modelers with a book that addressees not only the background and issues associated with object and object-relational modeling but suggests numerous ways to incorporate these concepts into your application designs.
The book provides an excellent introduction to the world of relational and object-relational design. There is an appropriate amount of material in the beginning of the book to bring you up to speed if you are not familiar with relational modeling concepts (which most of us are) and object modeling concepts using UML (which most of us aren't). If you have to learn one object notation methodology, UML (Unified Modeling Language) is the one you should learn. A chapter on UML introduces you using the notation, which is then used throughout remainder of the book.
These basic concepts are then quickly built upon . The authors next walk you through basic object database construction looking at such key concepts as class/entity definitions, logical and physical naming conventions and dealing with domains and list of values.
These concepts are further extended to examine the relationships between entities and classes. More advanced concepts like recursive structures, cyclical structures and N-ary relationships are explained in detail with working examples to show you how to put these concepts into action.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Contrary to what tool vendors may be saying, UML is difficult. This book goes along way into clearly explaining those difficult concepts and then applying them to practical application. It is, as the title indicates very Oracle centric, but would be worth while reading even for non Oracle people because of the way UML concepts are presented. Of particular note is the chapter on Composition and Aggregation, two UML concepts which have been left open for interpertation. The authors present their precise definition of the concepts and present it can be clearly understood and applied. This treatment alone make the book worth while. I also found the toe to toe comparative analysis UML vs. traditional ERD displayed throughout the book, to be compeling. The authors do take the liberty of expressing their own opinion of how things should be done and I found myself in agreement on some issues and disgreeing on others. (e.g. I agreed with the notion that recursive relationships are extremely useful and powerful structures. Yet, I found it it difficult to agree that logical and physical models should be merged.) Never the less opinions in the book are clearly marked as such. Whether you agree or not, does not detract from the crystalization of UML concepts and the illustrative examples. The authors comendably are not shy to point out when approriate, that UML diagrams are often imprecise, and they offer methods to improve precision when opportune. The book is an excellent complement to David Anstey's High Performance Oracle 8 Object-Oriented Design which tackels the big picture and concentrates on Oracle 8 itself, whereas this book concentrates on the the application of UML to Oracle 8.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Personally I enjoyed this book a lot. It advocates much which is sensible and useful such as a single logical and physical model, as well as demonstrating many useful and practical modeling patterns. I thought that the piece on use of inheritance was weak and I mark it down for that. Otherwise, it teaches many of the best OO approaches for modeling using composition, role players and gives an excellent explanation of how to do time related modeling and versioning. An ideal book for reconciling traditional db design with modern java development.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Even though this book says it is about Oracle, it really is useful for many other databases (like the Informix we use). The writing is very engaging and understandable. The topics covered do a very good job of explaining how to map ER diagrams into UML.
I was particularly pleased with the practical tips presented.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I had to buy this book for my graduate database course and I ended up returning it to the bookstore and getting my money back. This book is an example of most incompetent technical writing. From lots of inconsistencies in its text to poor wording and logical structure it made me hate it after a few first chapters.
Conclusion -- Better, treat yourself with a nice dinner instead of this junk, unless you absolutely have to have this dull book.
Comment 0 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback