Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 7.45

or
 
   
Trade in Yours
For a 0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Operation Archery (Raid) [Paperback]

Ken Ford
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
RRP: 11.99
Price: 10.66 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.33 (11%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Friday, 22 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Trade In this Item for up to 0.25
Trade in Operation Archery (Raid) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

1 Jun 2011 Raid (Book 21)
"Operation Archery: The Commandos and the Vaagso Raid, 1942".

Frequently Bought Together

Operation Archery (Raid) + The Cockleshell Raid - Bordeaux 1942 + The Bruneval Raid Operation Biting 1942
Price For All Three: 30.60

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (1 Jun 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184908372X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849083720
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 18.3 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 651,479 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's all about the (fish) oil. 17 Jan 2012
By N. Brown VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
When Osprey kicked off their new `Raid' series in the autumn of 2009 they started, as they generally do, with some pretty familiar subjects; Point-du-Hoc, Entebbe, the Iranian Embassy etc. A great many of the titles in this series will have name recognition well beyond Osprey's normal hardcore military history readership as most of these tales of daring-do have featured in films and TV documentaries over the years. Partly for that reason I have come late to this series and waited until it started to cover less well trodden paths.

Whilst Operation Archery was an operation I was aware of through a Ballantine Book by Brigadier Peter Young published in the early 1970's, I was interested to see it get the full Osprey treatment of colour maps and illustrations.

On the face of it a `raid' to destroy fish oil processing plants lack the obvious `glamour' (if that is the right word) of many other WW2 commando operations. I suspect that this factor is the reason why this raid, one of the earliest for the British Commandos, has been a less attractive subject for film and TV. This is a shame because this is a true combined operation with action from naval and air forces playing pivotal parts. Well done to Ken Ford in making sure that all these aspects are well covered as well as the actions of the Commando's themselves. There is certainly plenty happening to easily fill the 80 pages allowed under the Raid format, in fact it could have probably done with a little more space. Although the raid is a great success, it is questionable the extent claimed by the author that German division were `pinned down' in Norway long after the event.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A concise read 12 July 2011
By BLT
Format:Paperback
A very good resumé of a not very-publicized commando raid involving the three arms. The text is concise and the narration pleasant to read. Ken Ford the author, is to be congratulated on a job well-led.

As always I will lament on the extremely poor paintings depicting phases of the raid, taking a full two pages which add absolutely nothing to the story. I'd rather have more photos or have some enlarged. For example to see that Major "mad" Jack Churchill (always an original)is leaning on the scottish broadsword he's taken with him for the raid (p.46).
The colour plates are also extremely poor. What used to make the reputation of Osprey's sadly vanishing these last few years while prices never bow. Give the artwork to M. Chapell for example. If only Kevin Lyles came back ...

The cover page shows British commandos armed with Lee Enfield rifles n4 though none are seen throughout the duration of the raid (the type had hardly started to be issued). Page 29 colour plate purports that the rifle which is painted is a Lee Enfield rifle n4 though it is actually depicting an SMLE mark III.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
this is the amasing story of the best example of a combined attack involving the navy, airforce and the commandos - a must read for all trainee officers. the soldier manning the mortar is my Dad so i am biased
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Operation Archery 13 July 2012
By Nuno
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A very nice book, with intro, planning, training, background, the mission, analysys, with various maps, pictures, drawings.
The only minus was the TOE, is not very clear.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Operation Negligible Original Content 21 Aug 2011
By R. A Forczyk - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I `ve read a number of books about British commando operations in the Second World War over the past forty years and the December 1941 raid on Vaagso in Norway always figured prominently in various accounts. Five years ago, Osprey published Tim Moreman's volume in the Battle Order series on British Commandos, which also covered the Vaagso Raid. Now, Ken Ford has written Operation Archery on the Vaagso raid for the Raid series. It is an attractive volume, well-illustrated and the narrative flows well, so I'ld like to say that it's another great addition to the series and leave it at that, but it simply isn't true. The lack of original research put into this volume is astounding and much of it is a regurgitation of existing works, mostly written over forty years ago. Not one book listed in the bibliography was written after 1967 (before Engima was declassified). Consequently, there is a great deal of overlap with previous books on this subject, particularly Tim Moreman's earlier volume (similar map, same photos, similar text). However, the most egregious flaw is that author neither made any effort to research the German side of the raid or to update himself on more recent research on the raid, rendering this volume filled with obsolete and even erroneous information.

The volume begins with an introduction outlining Britain's strategic situation in late 1941 - Churchill's desire to strike back at Nazi-occupied Europe and assist the beleaguered Soviet Union, but with limited military means to accomplish this. The author discuses how Combined Operations' commandos were viewed as an immediate means to strike at Germany's coastal defenses, particularly in weakly defended areas such Norway. He then discusses how the fish oil plants at Vaagso were an important strategic economic target, although he fails to quantify what percent of Germany's explosives production depended on Vaagso; it couldn't have been too great, since German production of explosives doubled over the next year even after the loss of Vaagso's fish oil plants. The author also mentions that one of the secondary objectives of the raid was to rescue Norwegian civilians who wanted to go to England and to "deliver Christmas presents for the children of Vaagso. " The sections on training and planning for the raid were OK, but not as detailed as Moreman's. For example, it would have been useful for the author to inform readers that a commando troop had 64 men. The author also mentions that the capture of Enigma material was an objective of the raid, but fails to mention that a special Royal Navy snatch team was attached to the raiding force, or the role of Norwegian civilians in providing accurate information on the target. The author would have benefited from consulting Hugh Sebag-Montefiore's excellent Enigma: The Battle for the Code (2000), which has a good deal of new information about the Vaagso raid, none of which is incorporated in this volume. According to Sebag-Montefiore, the capture of Enigma materials was not a secondary task for the raiders, but actually the primary rationale.

The section on the raid per se is 38 pages long and has 1 BEV map, 1 2-D map (similar to Moreman's) and two battle scenes by Howard Gerrard. Indeed, the artwork is the best selling point of the volume. The author's narrative is decent, even as it parallels previous accounts of the raid. Several points about the raid are interesting: the use of white phosphorus bombs to provide smoke, naval gunfire, signal difficulties, fratricide incidents, etc. It was fortunate for the British that the landings were virtually unopposed since the coordination between air-ground-sea forces was imperfect. Only vague detail is provided on the German defenders. I found it interesting that both lead commando troop leaders were killed in Vaagso and that the troops then lost all momentum and just milled around for a time - this conflicts with the oft-told dogma about initiative training in the commandos. Some of the photos about commandos standing around doing nothing during the raid and two men helping a walking wounded spoke volumes about pre-raid training on `actions on the objective.' The author fails to mention that the commandos had a 4-1 advantage in Vaagso, with air and naval gunfire support, but still required nearly three hours to reduce a small German force in wood-frame houses. Other than a photo of a 3-inch mortar, there Is little or no mention about commando support weapons, but the British troop leaders were either dead or forgot to employ them. The author also mentions the naval actions in the fjord which resulted in eight German merchant ships eliminated, but if the author had consulted Sebag-Montefiore he would have seen that an Enigma machine and information on settings was recovered - probably the biggest success of the raid, which the author missed.

In the aftermath and analysis section, the author specifies British casualties but is vague about German losses. He seems to come down on the side of previous British accounts of the raid, which claim 120-150 Germans killed and 100+ captured. If the author had bothered to use the Internet for research, he could easily have found the German after action review of the raid on Axishistory.com, which breaks down German casualties by service and specifies 38 killed, 15 wounded and 107 missing. This means that the commandos suffered 70 casualties and inflicted 77 on the German ground troops in Vaagso, essentially a 1-1 exchange. It would have been nice to know something about the German POWs, too (which included a Kriesgmarine signals team). Even though he mentions that bringing Norwegians back to Britain was one of the secondary objectives of the raid, he fails to mention how many were actually brought back. Nor does he ever tell the reader if the children of Vaagso ever got those Christmas presents....
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars When Britain and its Commonwealth stood alone 15 Oct 2012
By A Movie Buff - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is one more addition to an excellent well illustrated series of books on specific operations during the second world war. It specifically refers to a time when Britain stood alone in Europe and had to show an initiative by these small Combined Operation raids to keep the Home Front morale positive.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A concise read 12 July 2011
By BLT - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A very good resumé of a not very-publicized commando raid involving the three arms. The text is concise and the narration pleasant to read. Ken Ford the author, is to be congratulated on a job well-led.
As always I will lament on the extremely poor paintings depicting phases of the raid, taking a full two pages which add absolutely nothing to the story. I'd rather have more photos or have some enlarged. For example to see that Major "mad" Jack Churchill is leaning on the broadsword he's taken with him for the raid (p.46).
The colour plates are also extremely poor. What used to make the reputation of Osprey's sadly vanishing these last few years while prices never bow. Give the artwork to M. Chapell for example. If only Kevin Lyles came back ...

The cover page shows British commandos armed with Lee Enfield rifles n4 though none are seen throughout the duration of the raid. Page 29 colour plate purports that the rifle which is painted is a Lee Enfield rifle n4 though it is actually depicting an SMLE mark III.
4.0 out of 5 stars Commandos to Norway... 9 May 2014
By D. S. Thurlow - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
After the fall of France in 1940, and the decimation of its conventional forces, Britain had few ways to strike back at Nazi Germany in Europe. A directive from Churchill to resort to unconventional warfare led to the formation of commando units trained for quick hit-and-run raids. The British raid on Vaagso in occupied Norway in 1941 demonstrated the commando concept was coming of age.

"Operation Archery" is an Osprey Raid Series book, authored by Ken Ford with the support of three illustrators. The narrative sets the stage for the raid and includes a fairly detailed discussion of its execution by a combined force of Commandos, the Royal Navy, the Royal Air Force, and a contingent of Norwegian troops. The text is nicely supplemented by a collection of period photographs and illustrations, and includes an analysis of the effects of the raid.

This is an interesting read on what Britain did during the darkest days of the Second World War to keep the Germans off balance. It is a very-British centric presentation, and places heavy emphasis of the fact of striking back, even at a significant cost in casualties among the commandos. Recommended to students of the conflict as an introduction to commando special operations.
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding short history of this little known (in the USA) raid 3 Mar 2013
By Maggot - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
THis is a short story but heavy on important details. The writing was very good and one almost feels like they are in there destroying the fish oil factories! I learned a lot, which is one of my primary reasons for reading such books. It was especially good in that it did not spend 100+ pages on background.... it focused heavily on the immediate planning, the actual raid and the aftermath. Great job.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback