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OpenGL Shading Language [Paperback]

Randi J. Rost
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

12 Feb 2004 0321197895 978-0321197894 1

Praise for OpenGL® Shading Language

OpenGL® Shading Language provides a timely, thorough, and entertaining introduction to the only OpenGL ARB-approved high-level shading language in existence. Whether an expert or a novice, there are gems to be discovered throughout the book, and the reference pages will be your constant companion as you dig into the depths of the shading APIs. From algorithms to APIs, this book has you covered.”

     —Bob Kuehne
         CEO, Blue Newt Software

“Computer graphics and rendering technologies just took a giant leap forward with hardware vendors rapidly adopting the new OpenGL Shading Language. This book presents a detailed treatment of these exciting technologies in a way that is extremely helpful for visualization and game developers.”

     —Andy McGovern
         Founder, Virtual Geographics, Inc.

“The OpenGL Shading Language is at the epicenter of the programmable graphics revolution, and Randi Rost has been at the center of the development of this significant new industry standard. If you need the inside track on how to use the OpenGL Shading Language to unleash new visual effects, and unlock the supercomputer hiding inside the new generation of graphics hardware, then this is the book for you.”

     —Neil Trevett
         Senior Vice President Market Development, 3Dlabs

"The author has done an excellent job at setting the stage for shader development, what the purpose is, how to do it, and how it all fits together."
—Jeffery Galinovsky
Strategic Software Program Manager, Intel Corporation

The OpenGL® Shading Language, a high-level procedural shading language for OpenGL®, is the most important new development in graphics programming to emerge in years. OpenGL is the leading cross-platform 3D-graphics API, and the OpenGL Shading Language allows developers to take total control over the most important stages of the graphics-processing pipeline.

OpenGL® Shading Language is the experienced application programmer's guide to writing shaders. Part reference, part tutorial, this book thoroughly explains the shift from fixed-functionality graphics hardware to the new era of programmable graphics hardware and the additions to the OpenGL API that support this programmability. With OpenGL and shaders written in the OpenGL Shading Language, applications can perform better, achieving stunning graphics effects by utilizing the capabilities of both the visual processing unit and the central processing unit.

In this book, you will find a detailed introduction to the OpenGL Shading Language and the new OpenGL function calls that support it. The text begins by describing the syntax and semantics of this high-level programming language. Once this foundation has been established, the book explores the creation and manipulation of shaders using new OpenGL function calls.

OpenGL® Shading Language features extensive examples of shaders and their underlying algorithms, including

  • Procedural texturing
  • Noise
  • Particle systems
  • Hatching
  • Analytic antialiasing
  • Image processing

The color plate section illustrates the power and sophistication of the OpenGL Shading Language. The API Function Reference at the end of the book is an excellent quick reference to the API entry points that support the OpenGL Shading Language. An enhanced online index allows readers to quickly and easily search the entire text for specific topics.




Product details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 1 edition (12 Feb 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321197895
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321197894
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 17.8 x 3.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,462,924 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

“As the ‘Red Book’ is known to be the gold standard for OpenGL, the ‘Orange Book’ is considered to be the gold standard for the OpenGL Shading Language. With Randi’s extensive knowledge of OpenGL and GLSL, you can be assured you will be learning from a graphics industry veteran. Within the pages of the second edition you can find topics from beginning shader development to advanced topics such as the spherical harmonic lighting model and more.”

—David Tommeraasen, CEO/Programmer, Plasma Software

 

“This will be the definitive guide for OpenGL shaders; no other book goes into this detail. Rost has done an excellent job at setting the stage for shader development, what the purpose is, how to do it, and how it all fits together. The book includes great examples and details, as well as good additional coverage of 2.0 changes!”

—Jeffery Galinovsky, Director of Emerging Market, Platform Development, Intel Corporation

 

“The coverage in this new edition of the book is pitched just right to help many new shader-writers get started, but with enough deep information for the ‘old hands.’”

—Marc Olano, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland

 

“This is a really great book on GLSL—well written and organized, very accessible, and with good real-world examples and sample code. The topics flow naturally and easily, explanatory code fragments are inserted in very logical places to illustrate concepts, and, all in all, this book makes an excellent tutorial as well as a reference.”

—John Carey, Chief Technology Officer, C.O.R.E. Feature Animation

 

OpenGL® Shading Language provides a timely, thorough, and entertaining introduction to the only OpenGL ARB-approved high-level shading language in existence. Whether an expert or a novice, there are gems to be discovered throughout the book, and the reference pages will be your constant companion as you dig into the depths of the shading APIs. From algorithms to APIs, this book has you covered.”

—Bob Kuehne, CEO, Blue Newt Software

 

“Computer graphics and rendering technologies just took a giant leap forward with hardware vendors rapidly adopting the new OpenGL Shading Language. This book presents a detailed treatment of these exciting technologies in a way that is extremely helpful for visualization and game developers.”

—Andy McGovern, Founder, Virtual Geographics, Inc.

 

“The OpenGL Shading Language is at the epicenter of the programmable graphics revolution, and Randi Rost has been at the center of the development of this significant new industry standard. If you need the inside track on how to use the OpenGL Shading Language to unleash new visual effects and unlock the supercomputer hiding inside the new generation of graphics hardware, then this is the book for you.”

—Neil Trevett, Senior Vice President, Market Development, 3Dlabs

 

 

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Praise for OpenGL® Shading Language

OpenGL® Shading Language provides a timely, thorough, and entertaining introduction to the only OpenGL ARB-approved high-level shading language in existence. Whether an expert or a novice, there are gems to be discovered throughout the book, and the reference pages will be your constant companion as you dig into the depths of the shading APIs. From algorithms to APIs, this book has you covered.”

     —Bob Kuehne
         CEO, Blue Newt Software

“Computer graphics and rendering technologies just took a giant leap forward with hardware vendors rapidly adopting the new OpenGL Shading Language. This book presents a detailed treatment of these exciting technologies in a way that is extremely helpful for visualization and game developers.”

     —Andy McGovern
         Founder, Virtual Geographics, Inc.

“The OpenGL Shading Language is at the epicenter of the programmable graphics revolution, and Randi Rost has been at the center of the development of this significant new industry standard. If you need the inside track on how to use the OpenGL Shading Language to unleash new visual effects, and unlock the supercomputer hiding inside the new generation of graphics hardware, then this is the book for you.”

     —Neil Trevett
         Senior Vice President Market Development, 3Dlabs

"The author has done an excellent job at setting the stage for shader development, what the purpose is, how to do it, and how it all fits together."
—Jeffery Galinovsky
Strategic Software Program Manager, Intel Corporation

The OpenGL® Shading Language, a high-level procedural shading language for OpenGL®, is the most important new development in graphics programming to emerge in years. OpenGL is the leading cross-platform 3D-graphics API, and the OpenGL Shading Language allows developers to take total control over the most important stages of the graphics-processing pipeline.

OpenGL® Shading Language is the experienced application programmer's guide to writing shaders. Part reference, part tutorial, this book thoroughly explains the shift from fixed-functionality graphics hardware to the new era of programmable graphics hardware and the additions to the OpenGL API that support this programmability. With OpenGL and shaders written in the OpenGL Shading Language, applications can perform better, achieving stunning graphics effects by utilizing the capabilities of both the visual processing unit and the central processing unit.

In this book, you will find a detailed introduction to the OpenGL Shading Language and the new OpenGL function calls that support it. The text begins by describing the syntax and semantics of this high-level programming language. Once this foundation has been established, the book explores the creation and manipulation of shaders using new OpenGL function calls.

OpenGL® Shading Language features extensive examples of shaders and their underlying algorithms, including

  • Procedural texturing
  • Noise
  • Particle systems
  • Hatching
  • Analytic antialiasing
  • Image processing

The color plate section illustrates the power and sophistication of the OpenGL Shading Language. The API Function Reference at the end of the book is an excellent quick reference to the API entry points that support the OpenGL Shading Language. An enhanced online index allows readers to quickly and easily search the entire text for specific topics.




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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Solid Reference Book 25 April 2005
By Mr AI
Format:Paperback
I was surprised at how large this book was when it arrived: bigger than the main OpenGL reference book in the same series. And the material is a little dilute - 200 pages of top quality content packed into a 600 page book.
I got slightly frustrated that it took several chapters to get into the meat of the book: before the authors got to creating useful shaders. But with hindsight, the basic material is very useful. There are gotcha's in the shading language, and the authors do a good job of making the path as plain as possible.
Even though fewer and fewer projects I work on (I work in the games industry) use OpenGL, the shading language is probably the most important addition to the OpenGL API for years. It is a standard, and the book was designed to document that standard. Most of the last section of the book is an in depth reference which is useful to have.
I found some chapters absolutely superb. But a lot of the book's material was wasted on me. The stuff on procedural shading is much better covered in other books. Generating a mandlebrot shader, for example, is hardly useful in a real project, in my opinion.
So I'd recommend the book to anyone who needs to understand GLSL. The bit that's useful is very useful, and I felt it was completely worth the cover price. The rest of the book, as my wife said, is a bit of a waste of trees.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
71 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Future of OpenGL Programming 26 Feb 2004
By Paul Martz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
In the 1970s, vector-based graphics gave way to raster graphics, and several raster algorithms demonstrated the new technology's ability to produce breathtaking images. Unfortunately, accelerating these algorithms in hardware proved difficult and costly.
Recently, programmable graphics hardware capable of rendering such algorithms in realtime has become inexpensive and widely available. The result-a small handful of proprietary shading languages created and proposed as standards for this new industry.
OpenGL Shading Language by Randi Rost (Addison-Wesley, 458 pages) describes the OpenGL Shading Language, the first shading language designed as a cross-platform open standard by a group of graphics hardware and software vendors.
The author is a veteran of the computer graphics industry. Rost started programming graphics on an Apple II in the late 1970s. He was working on programmable graphics hardware as early as 1983, when programmable graphics hardware meant little more than a framebuffer with a microcode interface.
Graphics hardware has advanced dramatically since then and continues to advance rapidly today. Most modern 3D hardware supports some type of programmable interface, and should support the Architectural Review Board (ARB)-approved OpenGL Shading Language in the near future. "We think the hardware designs are moving quite rapidly," said Rost. "It should only be a generation or two before all OpenGL hardware vendors fully support the OpenGL Shading Language."
The first chapter is a whirlwind overview of OpenGL. You might be tempted to skip this chapter. But before you do, consider that the author is one of only a few who have contributed to every major revision of OpenGL-who better to learn from? If you're a beginner or intermediate OpenGL programmer, you'll certainly learn something in this brief review.
Chapters 2 through 7 introduce the reader to the OpenGL Shading Language, covering topics such as language semantics, built-in functions, and OpenGL entry points for specifying shaders.
Chapter 8 discusses shader development and performance issues. As you might expect from a book on a shading language, much of the performance discussion concerns shaving cycles from vertex- and pixel-shaders. The information is practical and not obvious even to intermediate programmers, such as using min() or max() instead of clamp() when you know the variable will only exceed one end of a range. However, I found little discussion on how a developer might determine which stage of the rendering pipeline is the performance bottleneck. Since this subject is considered black magic by many young and enthusiastic graphics developers, Rost could have added value to his book with a short section on this subject.
In programming, a few lines of code are worth a thousand words. Rost demonstrates this principle in chapter 9 where he provides shader listings for implementing core OpenGL functionality. The OpenGL Specification is the ultimate definition of OpenGL internal functionality, but the spec is mostly text and formulas, with only a few code listings. A programmer can quickly learn what OpenGL is doing under the hood by reading through the listings in chapter 9. These well-written, concise, and efficient examples of shader code are both illuminating and instructive.
Chapters 10 through 16 provide the computer graphics developer with real-time working OpenGL Shading Language source code for implementing several major computer graphics algorithms and techniques from the past 25 years. Topic areas include lighting, Phong shading, texture mapping, bump mapping, multi-texturing, procedural texture mapping, lattice shaders, noise, turbulence, shadows, animation, particle systems, antialiasing, hatching and other non-photorealistic techniques, vertex and image blending, image convolution, and many more.
These examples demonstrate the range of OpenGL Shading Language applications, and give developers a basis for writing new shaders. Rost's explanations of the algorithms are easy to read and comprehend, and demonstrate the depth and breadth of knowledge he has accumulated during his 25-year career in graphics.
"Designing and implementing programmable graphics hardware and a compiler for the OpenGL Shading Language required a lot of hard work by everyone involved," said Rost. "But with those pieces in place, it turned out to be remarkably easy to write shaders for a variety of interesting shading tasks. When we got these shaders working for the first time, it was a jaw-dropping experience."
Conspicuously missing is any mention of global illumination algorithms such as ray tracing and radiosity. Such scene-based algorithms present obvious challenges to vertex- and pixel-based shading languages. Rost confessed they have a rough ray-tracing demo that was not ready for publication when this book went to press. He expressed optimism about the OpenGL Shading Language's ability to accelerate programs of this type. "In future revisions of hardware, we'll be able to implement more interesting algorithms [than currently appear in this book]."
While reading OpenGL Shading Language, I often found myself noting similarities and differences between the OpenGL Shading Language and interfaces to other programmable graphics hardware I've used. The book's final chapter covers this topic by comparing and contrasting the OpenGL Shading Language to current commercial shading languages, such as RenderMan, ISL, HLSL, and Cg.
Two appendices serve as useful reference material. Appendix A covers OpenGL Shading Language grammar, and Appendix B documents OpenGL entry points for creating and managing shaders. The book also contains an index, a glossary, an extensive bibliography, and several diagrams and color images.
In general, the computer industry often provides two solutions, one proprietary and the other an open standard. As the only open standard shading language available that is designed for modern graphics hardware, the OpenGL Shading Language is certain to be around for several years to come. OpenGL Shading Language stands on its own as both a programming guide and reference manual for this significant new industry standard.
However, this book goes further by providing real-time examples of classic computer graphics techniques. OpenGL Shading Language is a must-have algorithm book that should be on every computer graphics developer's bookshelf.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine resource 27 April 2004
By Jack D. Herrington - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is excellent. It's easy to read, has solid examples in code and uses graphics sparingly (for a book on graphics) and effectively. Especially when it comes to graphics that explain the technology. For example, the graphics pipeline in chapter two is really handy.
The first two chapters stand out as a nice introduction to the topic and to the shading language in particular. After that the book is an on-and-off introduction and reference that will bring you up to speed today and act as a reference later on.
If I have one complaint it's that the reference materials, particularly in Appendix B could have been formatted and cross referenced a little better. As it stands they feel more like slightly reformatted UNIX man pages.
For those that need this book, and you know who you are, this an invaluable reference, and it's well written to boot.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book about realtime shader development 3 Mar 2004
By F. Schamel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
For beginners, the books gives an very good introduction into the OpenGL shading language. It starts with giving an overview over the previous OpenGL rendering architecture, smoothly motivating and introducing the shading language. Then, chapter by chapter it goes more and more into depth, containing interesting stuff for experts. This includes topics like advanced procedural texturing including antialiasing, NPR rendering and imaging techniques.

The language and structure of the book is clear, easy to follow and precise (especially compared to the Direct3D SDK documentation). Very useful is the appendix containing a shading language and API reference. Whoever works on realtime computer graphics should have this book in his shelf.

One minor warning for beginners: The book assumes that you are familar with OpenGL itself. The book does not replace an introduction into OpenGL.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Joins the OpenGL canon 12 April 2005
By Dave Astle - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The OpenGL Shading Language is without doubt the most important addition to OpenGL since its inception, and this book provides an excellent guide to programming with it. As one of the primary contributors to the development of the language, Rost provides a clear and well-written explanation of the language and how to use it.

The book begins with a review of OpenGL basics, followed by an introduction to shaders and how they fit into the pipeline. It then covers the language itself, including data types, operators, interaction with the OpenGL state machine and fixed function pipeline, built-in functions, and more. It also introduces and explains the OpenGL APIs needed to use shaders.

The last half of the book focuses on shader development, including general process and workflow, and coverage of many specific techniques, such as procedural textures and GPU-based animation. It even includes a section on implementing the fixed function pipeline using shaders.

The book ends with a handy comparison of GLSL with other shading languages, such as Cg and HLSL, and a couple of appendices providing a language grammar and API reference.

If you're doing shader development with OpenGL, you'll definitely want this book on your desk. My only complaint about it is that it was written before GLSL was officially promoted to the core. When that happened, a number of important things were changed that aren't reflected in the book. However, determining the differences isn't difficult, so don't let that deter you from picking this up.
5.0 out of 5 stars book collector . Buy it 7 April 2013
By Israel Diaz Torralba - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Why I can tell of a book of worship that is not said. look beyond and buy it.

Sorry my bad english. best of the best
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