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Open Your Eyes
 
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Open Your Eyes

Yes
11 Jun. 2009 | Format: MP3

£6.39 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £9.10 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:00
30
2
5:13
30
3
6:16
30
4
4:56
30
5
5:01
30
6
4:40
30
7
6:07
30
8
2:42
30
9
4:38
30
10
4:46
30
11
23:47
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Jun. 2009
  • Release Date: 11 Jun. 2009
  • Label: Eagle Rock
  • Copyright: 1997 Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:14:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002D5MWQU
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 60,281 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Horror Fan on 2 Jan. 2007
Format: Audio CD
To be frank I'm sick to death of arguments on what is required for a Yes album to be considered any good.

If you only listen to 70s Yes, thats great.

Personally I listen to some 70s Yes but prefer the later material from Drama onwards.

Most Yes fans would totally disagree with me but I've always found some aspects of their earlier non-commercial prog material to be rather hard going without taking anything away from the superb musicianship and vocals.

However, I would never criticise anyone for preferring this earlier material.

Basically, fans (like myself) who like later-period, upbeat, overproduced ?, commercial Yes with Trevor Rabin or otherwise also recognise great music.

Simple as that.

Oh, and Open Your Eyes does'nt sound as if it has been thrown together quickly or haphazardly.

The writing, muscianship, vocals and production are, as always, superb.

A great album, not perfect, what is ?. Similar to 90125 & Big Generator, many later period Yes fans could be missing out if they overlook it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David P. Weber on 22 Jan. 2015
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album is perfectly in sync with the output of Yes during the 1990s. It's ornate, full of big guitar songs coloured with multilayered vocal excursions.

When others say it's "limp", I don't know what they're comparing it to.. early Seventies Yes? 90125 or Big Generator? The fact is that Yes have been (are) several different bands with Chris Squire the sole mainstay. Yet some perennial Yes sounds and approaches have remained all the way through and Open Your Eyes features those very stamps.

BUT it should've been twenty minutes shorter. The Solution is five minutes of ideas stretched over more than 23 minutes, with long silences. It may be interesting listening if you're in a completely sound-free environment and have the time and concentration to zero in on the careful production and sonic quirks. One thinks the only reason this track is so long is that it was a way to fill the CD.

Even for Yes, sometimes less is more.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jan. 2000
Format: Audio CD
After the two amazing »Keys To Ascension« double CD's, it was really an anticlimax to put »Open Your Eyes« into the CD player.
But honestly, this album gains a lot once you've listened to it about ten times. Just don't take it for more than it is. It's just Yes from the band's more simplistic and semi-commercial side. A rock album.
One of the best tracks on »Open Your Eyes« is the ballad »From The Balcony« which touches the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album's style. Another good ballad is the halfway symphonic »Universal Garden« which is close to Yes'ish.
The catchy title song and the opener are quite good rock songs - they're just more simple than we Yes fans are used to from the band.
»Open Your Eyes« closes off with a kind of sound collage. Different. But pretty good, in fact, once you get used to it.
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Format: Audio CD
I got 'into' YES just as they were about to disappear to the USA for good (ie the release of 'Union') and hence just as I was going to lose any realistic chance of getting to see them perform live. 'Talk' came along in '94 and my hopes were briefly raised, but as far as I can tell they never bothered to perform it on this side of the Atlantic, so my hopes sagged again. Then there were the 'Keys' albums and the real hope of Wakeman rejoining the band properly - surely the holy grail for YES fans - and then... Wakeman dropped out again and all seemed lost. Thus it was that when 'Open Your Eyes' suddenly materialised, it seemed like manna from heaven. I believe I bought it on the day of its release - the only album I've ever been so keen to acquire - but kept it under wraps for a month so that I could give myself a birthday treat with my first listening. What self-control - and what a reward when the very first track burst out with the roaring soaring guitar riff intro to New State Of Mind! I believe I shed a tear of joy at that moment and my immediate thought was 'YES!'
I don't care if other people think this was a hasty construct to land a record contract - they are very likely correct in this surmise, especially given that Squire and Sherwood subsequently released their 'Conspiracy' albums which seem to carry all the original versions of the songs that went onto this one. At the end of the day, Squire was a founder member of YES and Sherwood was integral to YES from 'Union' onwards (even if he never actually joined the group until Wakeman finally decided he couldn't be bothered), so they were perfectly entitled to put forward their compositions for the YES brand. I don't care if prog-purists think it's a travesty of the YES brand because it's not a '70s extravaganza.
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By Jonathan VINE VOICE on 12 Oct. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I followed Yes right into the 90s with Talk. Then came marriage and career and children and when I started listening to music again Britpop had come and gone and woozy triphop was king. So I missed Yes for two decades until I drifted back to them with Fly From Here and the new one, the unfairly dismissed Heaven & Earth. So I've started filling in my back catalogue and Open Your Eyes is a controversial one. This 1997 album labours under dismal reviews from fans and a reputation as the nadir of Yes' output at a time when they seemed unable to sustain a stable lineup. However... I can't hear what all the fuss is about.

Certainly, coming at it fresh, it's a very enjoyable set of songs. It's stronger than Talk and very much the culmination of where Yes were going in the 80s and 90s, a band struggling to reconcile progressive and pop sensibilities, reluctant to consign themselves to a fan-pleasing groove of backward looking 20 minute 'rock symphonies' but unsure where they fit into the new musical pecking order.

You can see the schizophrenia in the lineup and the cover. Wakeman, the most unreconstructed progger, has gone and Billy Sherwood, with strong pop affiliations, is on keyboards. The Roger Dean logo is back (after Talk's ugly graffito) but on a stark black background: no vertiginous mountains or fantasy sky palaces. On my CD, the tribal Yes-glyph of The Ladder lurks, like a hobgoblin in the corner.
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