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Open Your Eyes
 
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Open Your Eyes

YES
11 Jun. 2009 | Format: MP3

£6.39 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.88 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:00
30
2
5:13
30
3
6:16
30
4
4:56
30
5
5:01
30
6
4:40
30
7
6:07
30
8
2:42
30
9
4:38
30
10
4:46
30
11
23:47

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Jun. 2009
  • Release Date: 11 Jun. 2009
  • Label: Eagle Rock
  • Copyright: 1997 Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:14:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002D5MWQU
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,027 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Agma on 7 Jun. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I can relate to the variety of reviews supporting the idea that this album is a complete washout. This is certainly:- one of the worst CD from Yes in absolute terms, and of overall quality alongside other well-known missfires, "Tormato " and "Union", as the songwriting is so disappointingly lax' and haywire. In my opinion the only really good/compelling song on this entire album is 'Man in the moon', and that one is worthy of the second and only extra star awarded.

The bulk of this album is mostly filled with left-over cannon fodder and a persistent:- slipstreaming, (appeal to everyone) mindset. 'New state of mind', (the opener,) is a total 'absolute' disaster and the following title track is just as sickly as a wet charade:- The rest of these non-entities are -skimmed/ b-rate pop songs derived from a total absence of imagination. There does also seem to be a safe playing formula to most of these songs as well, and it does curiously point towards corporate interfearance of the band. Wether or not that is true:- is on the face of it; irrelevant. "Open your eyes" is an ultimately, forgettable and tortuous excursion of an appaullingly formulaic and bland flight of cruise control.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Horror Fan on 2 Jan. 2007
Format: Audio CD
To be frank I'm sick to death of arguments on what is required for a Yes album to be considered any good.

If you only listen to 70s Yes, thats great.

Personally I listen to some 70s Yes but prefer the later material from Drama onwards.

Most Yes fans would totally disagree with me but I've always found some aspects of their earlier non-commercial prog material to be rather hard going without taking anything away from the superb musicianship and vocals.

However, I would never criticise anyone for preferring this earlier material.

Basically, fans (like myself) who like later-period, upbeat, overproduced ?, commercial Yes with Trevor Rabin or otherwise also recognise great music.

Simple as that.

Oh, and Open Your Eyes does'nt sound as if it has been thrown together quickly or haphazardly.

The writing, muscianship, vocals and production are, as always, superb.

A great album, not perfect, what is ?. Similar to 90125 & Big Generator, many later period Yes fans could be missing out if they overlook it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith Plant. on 3 Aug. 2014
Format: Audio CD
This is a curious misfire by Yes in that none of it is so terrible that it's unbearable it's just rather bland for a group like Yes who have scaled such impressive heights of originality and inspiration musically in the past. Okay, to clarify what I mean in the 70s Yes were virtually untouchable even their flawed albums were generally worth a very high rating. In the 80s they still managed to produce at least one classic album with the change of direction that resulted in 90125 and that's what makes this so disappointing. As I said none of this is outright bad and tracks like 'New state of mind', 'Open your eyes'' and 'From the balcony' are more of what we expect from Yes. Some others like 'Universal garden' come close to that. But that's it as everything else is not bad but disappointing for a band like Yes. From what I've heard this is an album that was put together quickly with the main contributors being Chris Squire and Billy Sherwood with Steve Howe and Jon Anderson making limited contributions because a record contract was on offer and they needed to get an album out fast! If that is the case it explains a lot. I must admit having seen Yes when they toured when this was out it was good to still see them on great form live. It's just a pity this album is only worth 2 1/2 stars (which I would give it if I could). Fortunately they would get it together a couple of years later when they produced The Ladder.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jan. 2000
Format: Audio CD
After the two amazing »Keys To Ascension« double CD's, it was really an anticlimax to put »Open Your Eyes« into the CD player.
But honestly, this album gains a lot once you've listened to it about ten times. Just don't take it for more than it is. It's just Yes from the band's more simplistic and semi-commercial side. A rock album.
One of the best tracks on »Open Your Eyes« is the ballad »From The Balcony« which touches the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album's style. Another good ballad is the halfway symphonic »Universal Garden« which is close to Yes'ish.
The catchy title song and the opener are quite good rock songs - they're just more simple than we Yes fans are used to from the band.
»Open Your Eyes« closes off with a kind of sound collage. Different. But pretty good, in fact, once you get used to it.
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Format: Audio CD
I got 'into' YES just as they were about to disappear to the USA for good (ie the release of 'Union') and hence just as I was going to lose any realistic chance of getting to see them perform live. 'Talk' came along in '94 and my hopes were briefly raised, but as far as I can tell they never bothered to perform it on this side of the Atlantic, so my hopes sagged again. Then there were the 'Keys' albums and the real hope of Wakeman rejoining the band properly - surely the holy grail for YES fans - and then... Wakeman dropped out again and all seemed lost. Thus it was that when 'Open Your Eyes' suddenly materialised, it seemed like manna from heaven. I believe I bought it on the day of its release - the only album I've ever been so keen to acquire - but kept it under wraps for a month so that I could give myself a birthday treat with my first listening. What self-control - and what a reward when the very first track burst out with the roaring soaring guitar riff intro to New State Of Mind! I believe I shed a tear of joy at that moment and my immediate thought was 'YES!'
I don't care if other people think this was a hasty construct to land a record contract - they are very likely correct in this surmise, especially given that Squire and Sherwood subsequently released their 'Conspiracy' albums which seem to carry all the original versions of the songs that went onto this one. At the end of the day, Squire was a founder member of YES and Sherwood was integral to YES from 'Union' onwards (even if he never actually joined the group until Wakeman finally decided he couldn't be bothered), so they were perfectly entitled to put forward their compositions for the YES brand. I don't care if prog-purists think it's a travesty of the YES brand because it's not a '70s extravaganza.
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