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Open Your Eyes
 
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Open Your Eyes

YES
11 Jun 2009 | Format: MP3

£6.39 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:00
30
2
5:13
30
3
6:16
30
4
4:56
30
5
5:01
30
6
4:40
30
7
6:07
30
8
2:42
30
9
4:38
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10
4:46
30
11
23:47

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Jun 2009
  • Release Date: 11 Jun 2009
  • Label: Eagle Rock
  • Copyright: 1997 Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:14:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002D5MWQU
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,579 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jan 2000
Format: Audio CD
After the two amazing »Keys To Ascension« double CD's, it was really an anticlimax to put »Open Your Eyes« into the CD player.
But honestly, this album gains a lot once you've listened to it about ten times. Just don't take it for more than it is. It's just Yes from the band's more simplistic and semi-commercial side. A rock album.
One of the best tracks on »Open Your Eyes« is the ballad »From The Balcony« which touches the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album's style. Another good ballad is the halfway symphonic »Universal Garden« which is close to Yes'ish.
The catchy title song and the opener are quite good rock songs - they're just more simple than we Yes fans are used to from the band.
»Open Your Eyes« closes off with a kind of sound collage. Different. But pretty good, in fact, once you get used to it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Agma on 7 Jun 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I can completely contest to the variety of reviews describing this album as a complete washout, but I don't feel upon deconstruction that it's quite as simple as that. This is however, probably one of the worst CD's from yes in terms of overall quality alongside "Tormato " and "Union", as the songwriting is lax' and haywire. In my opinion the only really good/compelling song on this album is 'Man in the moon' and that one is worthy of the extra star.

The bulk of this album is mostly filled with left-over cannon fodder and a decent into an (appeal to everyone) mindset. 'New state of mind', (the opener,) is a total disaster and the following title track is a sickly wet blanket:- the rest are semi-skimmed/ b-rate pop songs derived from an absence of imagination. There does seem to be a safe playing formula to most of these songs as well, and it does seem to point towards corporate interfearance of the band. Wether or not that is true:- is on the face of it; irrelevant. "Open your eyes" is an ultimately:- forgettable and tortuous excursion, into a formulaic and bland flight of cruise control.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Horror Fan on 2 Jan 2007
Format: Audio CD
To be frank I'm sick to death of arguments on what is required for a Yes album to be considered any good.

If you only listen to 70s Yes, thats great.

Personally I listen to some 70s Yes but prefer the later material from Drama onwards.

Most Yes fans would totally disagree with me but I've always found some aspects of their earlier non-commercial prog material to be rather hard going without taking anything away from the superb musicianship and vocals.

However, I would never criticise anyone for preferring this earlier material.

Basically, fans (like myself) who like later-period, upbeat, overproduced ?, commercial Yes with Trevor Rabin or otherwise also recognise great music.

Simple as that.

Oh, and Open Your Eyes does'nt sound as if it has been thrown together quickly or haphazardly.

The writing, muscianship, vocals and production are, as always, superb.

A great album, not perfect, what is ?. Similar to 90125 & Big Generator, many later period Yes fans could be missing out if they overlook it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith Plant. on 3 Aug 2014
Format: Audio CD
This is a curious misfire by Yes in that none of it is so terrible that it's unbearable it's just rather bland for a group like Yes who have scaled such impressive heights of originality and inspiration musically in the past. Okay to clarify what I mean. In the 70s Yes were virtually untouchable even their flawed albums were generally worth a high rating. In the 80s they still managed to produce at least one classic album with the change of direction that resulted in 90125 and that's what makes this so disappointing. As I said none of this is outright bad and tracks like 'New state of mind', 'Open your eyes'' and 'From the balcony' are more of what we expect from Yes. Some others like 'Universal garden' come close to that. But that's it as everything else is not bad but disappointing for Yes. From what I've heard this is an album that was put together together quickly with the main contributors being Chris Squire and Billy Sherwood with Steve Howe and Jon Anderson making limited contributions because a record contract was on offer and they needed to get an album out. If that is the case it explains a lot. I must admit having seen Yes when they toured when this was out it was good to still see them on great form live. It's just a pity this album is only worth 2 1/2 stars (which I would give it if I could). Fortunately they would get it together a couple of years later when they produced The Ladder.
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By Jonathan Rowe VINE VOICE on 12 Oct 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I followed Yes right into the 90s with Talk. Then came marriage and career and children and when I started listening to music again Britpop had come and gone and woozy triphop was king. So I missed Yes for two decades until I drifted back to them with Fly From Here and the new one, the unfairly dismissed Heaven & Earth. So I've started filling in my back catalogue and Open Your Eyes is a controversial one. This 1997 album labours under dismal reviews from fans and a reputation as the nadir of Yes' output at a time when they seemed unable to sustain a stable lineup. However... I can't hear what all the fuss is about.

Certainly, coming at it fresh, it's a very enjoyable set of songs. It's stronger than Talk and very much the culmination of where Yes were going in the 80s and 90s, a band struggling to reconcile progressive and pop sensibilities, reluctant to consign themselves to a fan-pleasing groove of backward looking 20 minute 'rock symphonies' but unsure where they fit into the new musical pecking order.

You can see the schizophrenia in the lineup and the cover. Wakeman, the most unreconstructed progger, has gone and Billy Sherwood, with strong pop affiliations, is on keyboards. The Roger Dean logo is back (after Talk's ugly graffito) but on a stark black background: no vertiginous mountains or fantasy sky palaces. On my CD, the tribal Yes-glyph of The Ladder lurks, like a hobgoblin in the corner.
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