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No One Knows About Persian Cats


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Product details

  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003JT0S3I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 477,768 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 May 2010
Format: DVD
The distinction between fiction and documentary realism in the films of Bahman Ghobadi is always a fine one, since while those earlier films set in the mountains of Kurdistan are clearly scripted and energetically structured, they don't make use of professional actors, but real people in many cases acting out situations that they've lived through and experienced firsthand. Set in Tehran, following the fortunes of a couple of young indie-rock musicians trying to get a band together and make arrangements to appear at a concert in London, No One Knows Persian Cats would seem to be a bit of a departure for the Kurdish-Iranian director, but in many ways the film adheres to the same themes and style that are in all Ghobadi's marvellous films - it's about freedom, and even more so than in his previous highly charged films, that freedom is expressed through music, movement and the desire to cross borders and boundaries.

What strikes the viewer immediately when watching No One Knows Persian Cats is not only how restrictive the laws are in Iran about the performance of music, but the impact such tight controls have on the general population. Previous Ghobadi films Marooned in Iraq and Half Moon certainly brought to attention the absurd prohibition placed on women singing in public, as well as the lengths that some people will go to in order to exercise their freedom of expression in this most traditional, fundamental and personal way.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rolling Stone on 27 Oct. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Interesting to see how an underground music culture and the vibrant precociousness of youth from a country that has been much maligned for other reasons can be brought to western tables for all to see. Watch it AND enjoy some of the music. It's an educating experience. Good film.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shayan Paydar on 27 July 2010
Format: DVD
I watched the film in a festival in Amterdam and loved that. It's not only a wonderful movie, but also an interesting collection of Persian underground music!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Guerilla Filmmaking About Renegade Iranian Musicians 9 Jan. 2011
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Bahman Ghobadi's "No One Knows About Persian Cats" is a minimalist docu-drama in which art mimics real life. This rogue film, shot completely on the fly and without permits, depicts the near impossibility of being an independent rock musician in contemporary Iran. So the great irony is that the film itself was conceived and executed in the same stealthy way in which the musicians depicted in the film must construct and then hide their illegal endeavors in underground exhibitions. "No One Knows About Persian Cats" is really a celebration of artistic freedom and a tribute to musical expression. The plot may be virtually non-existent, but the musical appeal is really undeniable.

In a nutshell, the entire film revolves around a couple of musicians who are attempting to travel to London for a gig. They've got two obstacles, however--they need passports and travel documents and they need additional band members. The rest of the movie is a loose excursion around the streets of Tehran as they hunt for leads to fulfill both goals. With plenty of humor, some disappointments, and loads of musical performances--"No One Knows About Persian Cats" isn't about narrative flow or plotting, but about the almost documentary experience of "being there." The performers are all incredibly naturalistic, as you might expect, and the youthful exuberance of rocking out permeates every frame of the film.

In addition to indie rock (some in Farsi, some English), there is more traditional fare as well as surprising forays into jazz and even rap. A particularly memorable sequence showcases a musical montage of Tehran's street people set to a rap accompaniment. Performances occur in abandoned warehouses, rooftops, and anywhere else they can get away with their "crimes." It's odd, though, I'm not sure it makes sense to describe a film as simultaneously grim and hopeful. And yet, that's exactly how I'd describe "No One Knows About Persian Cats." If the idea of the movie sounds like it isn't your thing--guess what? It probably isn't. If, however, you love international music and an insider's peak into another world lacking the freedoms we take for granted--check this out. KGHarris, 1/11.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
No One Knows About Persian Cats 8 July 2011
By Behnaz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Beautiful well made movie of Mr Ghoubadi. He certainly presented how the young people have to live underground to get to their hopes and wishes. Sad but it is true.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
As always, a great film. 5 Dec. 2012
By Mari - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
(Spoilers warning) Wonderful film, however, it is marketed as a documentary and this is not true. The ending of the film has the two main characters failing to leave the country and committing suicide, and in real life they actually did make it to London and sought asylum there.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Getting a sense of life in Tehran and some interesting music 23 Dec. 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
The facts stated in the negative review might well be true, but I really enjoyed watching this fairly amateur film that gave me a sense of what it might be like to be an artist struggling in an oppressive regime. The music montages, ala MTV, were also more interesting than I thought they would be. This might have been the first time I ever really cared enough about rap lyrics to read subtitles! The characters were compelling and I fully believed by the end that they would be willing to die for their art.
Great subject -- the film makes me very curious about ... 24 Nov. 2014
By Ami Marie Regier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Great subject -- the film makes me very curious about the state of the rock music scene in Iran. I greatly appreciate how Ghobadi's camera cuts from the vignettes of bands rehearsing in unusual, marginal spaces to an urban survey of social spaces of Tehran, structurally suggesting a parallel energy and set of concerns (censorship, care for creativity).
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