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One Hundred Names (Special Edition) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 456 customer reviews

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Kindle Edition, 11 Oct 2012
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Length: 481 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Description

Review

‘From the author of PS I Love You, this is the perfect summer’s day read … about what can be discovered if you look again at the ordinary’ Daily Express

‘An exquisitely crafted and poignant tale about finding the beauty that lies within the ordinary. Make space for it in your life.’ Heat

‘A captivating, heartwarming read. 4*’ Closer

‘Funny and touching – the perfect warm hug for an autumnal afternoon’ Woman

‘Completely gripping’ Essentials

About the Author

Cecelia Ahern is an international bestseller. She was catapulted into the spotlight with her hit debut novel, P.S. I Love You, which was adapted into a major movie.

Her subsequent novels have captured the hearts of readers in 46 countries – her themes touch a chord with people in every continent, with over 15 million copies of her books sold.

As well as writing novels, Cecelia has also created several TV series including the hit comedy series, Samantha Who?, in the USA.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 903 KB
  • Print Length: 481 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (11 Oct. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007350465
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007350469
  • ASIN: B00810S9AO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 456 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #96,944 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Denise4891 TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Aug. 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with Cecelia Ahern's books - enjoyed PS I Love You and Thanks for the Memories, not so keen on The Gift or The Book of Tomorrow. Sometimes it seems like she has a great idea for a book, but doesn't quite manage to follow through with a believable or engaging story.

So, the premise for this one is that journalist Kitty is given a list of names by her dying mentor Constance, with no indication of who these people are or why Constance was so interested in them. This happens at a time when Kitty is at her lowest ebb and is in the midst of a crisis of conscience and confidence, having been successfully sued by a PE teacher she falsely accused of abusing two of his pupils. She feels she owes it to Constance to redeem her career and self-respect by proving that she can be an honest and principled journalist.

As she starts to work her way through the list of names, Kitty encounters a group of seemingly non-descript people who on the surface appear to have nothing in common, and she struggles to see why Constance should have pointed her in their direction. However as their stories develop it becomes clear to Kitty that, with most people, it's what goes on beneath the surface that counts.

This one definitely fell into the `hit' category for me. It's a light, funny and heartwarming read (albeit verging on the sentimental at times) but there's also a bit of an edge to it. My one criticism would be that things are tied up a little too neatly and predictably at the end, but overall this didn't spoil my enjoyment of this charming and very likeable book.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I was intrigued by the idea behind this book and looked forward to an exciting read. I was disappointed. The characters failed to spark my interest, including Kitty, the main character who I found to be actually quite unlikeable. The characters remained flat and uninteresting throughout, as did the "story". There were some sparks and highlights, such as the quirky and heart-warming story about Mary-Rose. Regrettably, the other interesting character died right at the start of the book. I found myself skimming faster and faster just to finish the book, getting little enjoyment. The book just wasn't real and engaging, the characters weren't believable.

The ending was ok, even though the reader would have hoped for something more after 300+ boring pages - something to make the time spent seem less wasted.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Didn't think this was up to Cecila Aherns usual standard, rather disappointing read. Nothing quirky or unusal about this book, normally I wonder how her imagination works as her books are unusual but this one misses the mark.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
After enjoying `PS I Love You,' and `Where Rainbows End,' I was intrigued by the premise of `One Hundred Names,' and hoped it would be a return to form for Cecelia Ahern as I have been disappointed by her more recent offerings. After a slow start, the story began to gather momentum after protagonist Kitty had finally received the list of names and begun to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Whilst all of the characters have distinguishing features and stories to tell, Kitty only actually interacted closely with six of the 100 names, which is a little disappointing considering the book is based on this intriguing idea. In a nutshell, Ahern's latest novel is about a down-on-her-luck journalist who is trying to write her late editors story from a list of names and although I still prefer her first two books, it is the most heartfelt story from her in a long time.
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By prisrob TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
Cecelia Ahern is not an author I know, but it seems she has written several books. This book started off slowly for me, gathered steam and then there was a big let down. I stayed with it, the characters are intriguing, and the storyline at first was first rate.

Kitty Logan is a journalist for a well known magazine. She was a prolific writer, and her journalism gained her fame. So much fame, she was asked to join a television program. Here, she made an error that pushed her to the forefront of every newspaper and was fired from her television job. Everything that occurred was about Kitty's loss. The damage she did to others was not on her mind or of her concern, unless it related to her. This is not a likable character . She becomes hunted, protestors cover her apartment steps with paint and feces. She goes into hiding mode, until she realizes her mentor, friend, and editor, Constance, is dying and she has to see her.

Constance is in hospital dying from breast cancer. Kitty has a fear of hospitals but forces herself to visit. Here, she finds an understanding, Constance, who urges her to start writing again. She tells Kitty her current writing is passable but not good. Kitty is shocked with the truth, but realizes her friend is correct. Constance goes on to tell her that she had left a wish of what her last writing article would be, and urges Kitty to carry on her wish.

As the title of this book relates, One Hundred Names, is the project. This may be the best part of this book. Researching and finding these people and trying to put together what they might have in common for an article to be written. Somewhere along the track, the writing goes awry, we meet people Kitty knows and the people on the list, but the storyline meanders, and becomes trite at times. The ending is OK, but after the race to see what this all means, a little disappointing.

Recommended with reservations. prisrob 12-03-13
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