Watch now

Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

One Day In September [DVD]


Price: £5.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
23 new from £5.90 7 used from £2.19

Amazon Instant Video

Watch One Day In September instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post

Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

One Day In September [DVD] + Munich [DVD]
Price For Both: £9.18

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Michael Douglas
  • Directors: Kevin Macdonald
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Lions Gate Home Ent. UK Ltd
  • DVD Release Date: 9 Sep 2007
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FOPO4I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 24,799 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Kevin MacDonald directs this Oscar-winning documentary, examining the events of the 1972 Munich Olympics when the extreme Palestinian group Black September held eleven Israeli athletes hostage. Archive material and music mingles with interview footage of those involved at the time, including the only surviving member of the Black September group.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By PlexShaw on 20 Jan 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Kevin MacDonald's gloriously exhilarating and fascinating documentary charts the events surrounding the 1972 Munich Olympic Games, when the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took several Israeli athletes hostage - with tragic consequences. From the sparse but effective narration by Michael Douglas to the unbiased approach, this is a class act through and through. Much of the documentary focuses on the German government and the Olympic Committee's ineffective handling of the situation and the way in which real people's lives were put at risk for what descended into a media circus of the worst kind. A horrifying reminder of what complacency at the most dire of times can do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Brian Levine on 31 May 2007
Format: DVD
If you do not watch documentaries, watch this and you will be converted. The slow release onto the celluloid is mesmerising and compelling: it just keeps getting better and better.

No padding, no dodgy dialogue, no script boobs; just an incredible story packed into a relatively short period of screen-time. It feels as though every image, every frame has been chosen specifically to drive the story.

Basically, this film sucks you in, grabs you by the neck and delivers such a painful sucker-punch that it leaves you shaking, quite literally.

Buy it, watch it and wonder how the hell someone let the mess in 1972 ever happen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By ILONACAT on 6 Sep 2004
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
I don't think anyone could watch this film and not be moved . .to anger as well as tears. The hopeless (as we know now) situation of the Israeli hostages is interspersed with interviews with many of the people involved that day, and with coverage of the Olympic events themselves. Though we know how it's going to end, the almost unbearable tension is palpable.
This video is rated 12 and over. Would I be happy for a 12-year-old to see close-up photographs of the dead hostages ? Depends on the 12-year-old, I think.
The apparent lack of remorse in the only surviving terrorist remains the most chilling aspect of this film, whilst the daughter placing sunflowers on the grave of the father she cannot remember remains the most poignant.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By haunted on 3 Dec 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a top class documentary, telling the story of the events surrounding the murder of Israeli athletes and coaches in Munich in 1972. There is an interview with the last surviving Palestinian who took part in the attack. He describes being picked for the mission and the specific training undertaken. He is not remorseful in any way for the deaths that took place. There are also touching interviews with family members of the Israelis. Most damningly from the German point of view local police and politicians describe honestly how confused they were in trying to settle the crisis.

The film sets the scene of the Munich Olympics, describing how anxious the organisers were for the games to be as carefree as possible leading to minimal security in the athletes village. Using remarkable news footage the film gradually builds up the tension as the Israelis are taken hostage. Negotiations with local politicians and police take place. A planned rescue by police is cancelled at the last minute.

Eventually the Palestinians are offered a plane and a rescue mission is planned at the airport. This is a disaster for all kinds of reasons and all the hostages are killed. The surviving Palestinians are arrested.

Even more chilling is the tacit admission by the Germans that the captured Palestinians were released deliberately by way of a "mock" hijack some months after the massacre.

The makers realise that a simple retelling of the events is the best way to get across the horror that unfolded. No editorials are needed. The viewer is left to come to their own conclusions. Michael Douglas' low key narration hints from the beginning that we are watching a story that will not have a happy ending.
An amazing piece of living history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mr. J. Archer on 12 Sep 2008
Format: DVD
A compelling account of the tragedy at the Munich Olympic Games. Michael Douglas lends his voice to what can only be described as a superb piece of documentary film making by Kevin McDonald. One Day In September captivates the viewer from start to finish, documenting the tragic events and seemingly hopeless circumstances of all involved in and around 31 Connollystrasse, September the 5th 1972. With interviews from the Israeli athletes families, the then German negotiators and the only surviving terrorist Jamal Al-Gashey. The suspense and tension created while watching will make you not want to leave the room.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 6 Mar 2006
Format: VHS Tape
I'm not sure why this doesn't appear on DVD on Amazon UK - as it's available in certain chain-stores in the high street with a sticker alluding to Steven Spielberg's recent 'Munich.'
1999's 'One Day in September' is one of the great documentaries and should be of appeal to anyone who has enjoyed Kevin Macdonald's popular 'Touching the Void' (as it uses a similar style) or Spielberg's recent 'Munich.' It towers over the patchy recent BBC2 and Channel 4 documentaries on the response to Black September and appears to have been a key influence on the approach of Michael Winterbottom's controversial 'The Road to Guantanomo' (2006) alongside the aforementioned 'Touching the Void.'
'one day in SEPTEMBER' is based on the Faber book of the same name and deals with the hostage crisis initiated in Munich in September of 1972 as West Germany held the 'Olympics of Peace and Joy.' Unlike Spielberg's 'Munich' (2005) we get some idea of the kind of things that drove the members of Black September - which is not to say they are approved of, but give context. & let's recall key Israeli politicians have roots in terrorism committed by gangs such as the Irgun and Stern (though Spielberg's film does reference Israel's bombing of Palestinian refugee camps in response for Munich - something that isn't here). Jeremy Bowen's book on the 1967 War is a good reader regarding the backdrop of Munich, Black September and those acts that followed (some of which are covered in the excellent documentary 'The Power of Nightmares').
Macdonald's documentary is as vital as 1975's Vietnam-docu 'Hearts & Minds' - a similar style is shown where the story is more or less left to tell itself. We don't need a Michael Moore-style character prancing around with his ego and baseball cap here.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
Subtitles 0 9 Jan 2013
See all discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback