Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
One Day and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £2.70 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
One Day has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

One Day Paperback – 4 Feb 2010

2,031 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 4 Feb 2010
£6.29
£0.73 £0.01
£6.29 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

  • One Day
  • +
  • Us
Total price: £10.14
Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks; Reprint edition (4 Feb. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340896981
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340896983
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,031 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Nicholls trained as an actor before making the switch to writing. His TV credits include the third series of Cold Feet, Rescue Me, and I Saw You, as well as a much-praised modern version of Much Ado About Nothing and an adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles, both for BBC TV. David has continued to write for film and TV as well as writing novels, and he has twice been nominated for BAFTA awards.

David's bestselling first novel, STARTER FOR TEN, was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club in 2004, and David has written the screenplays for film versions of both STARTER FOR TEN (released in 2006, starring James McAvoy) and THE UNDERSTUDY (not yet released).

David Nicholls' third novel, ONE DAY, was published in hardback in 2009 to extraordinary critical acclaim, and stayed in the Sunday Times top ten bestseller list for ten weeks on publication. It has since gone on to sell over 2 million copies and has been translated into thirty-seven languages. ONE DAY won the 2010 Galaxy Book of the Year Award. David wrote the screenplay for Lone Scherfig's film adaptation starring Jim Sturgess and Anne Hathaway, which was released in 2010.

David's fourth novel, US, has been longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014.

Product Description

Review

ONE DAY is destined to be a modern classic. (Daily Mirror)

Big, absorbing, smart, fantastically readable. (Nick Hornby)

A wonderful, wonderful book. (The Times)

I finished it last night and I'm still quite wobbly and affected by it. It was BRILLIANT. . . the jealousy nearly made me puke. I wish I'd written this book. (Marian Keyes)

I couldn't think of anyone who wouldn't love this book. (Simon Mayo Books Panel, BBC Radio Five Live)

An unputdownable romance for the 21st century. (SHE)

A genuine tear-jerker as well as laugh-out-loud funny. (Independent on Sunday Books of the Year 2009)

This perfectly executed novel is a reminder that reading can be the finest entertainment there is. (Guardian)

Book Description

ONE DAY is the multi-million copy bestselling novel that brilliantly captures the experiences of a generation.

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Related Media

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By RPM veteran on 14 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback
If you were born between 1965 and 1975 and ever had a 'we're just good friends, honest' relationship with a fellow student - you will enjoy this. You will cringe.
I laughed out loud at many of the observations - the angst of twenty-somethings' relationships, the ritual of thirty-somethings' weddings, the horror of other people's baby-bliss. The disbelief that any of us would ever turn 40.
Loved it, loved it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Scholastica on 21 May 2011
Format: Paperback
This was given to me as a Christmas present - I wouldn't have chosen it myself as, at first glance, I thought it would be nauseatingly self-congratulatory, in the way of many 'modern' novels that try to capture the essence of the times. However, this was a trap that David Nicholls managed to skirt very expertly, because I didn't find a hint of any of that painful introspection that I was so dreading. And I enjoyed reading it.

Having now read it, this story of the first twenty years of 'adulthood' of two people, Emma and Dexter, who happened to graduate the year after I did, I can understand the huge popularity of this book. Firstly, although grand in scope, it's extremely readable. Secondly, it's perceptive - we can all recognise ourselves. And finally, it's very forgiving. We are, after all, only human. It's also fun - in a very therapeutically painful way. If you're the same age as me, you'll probably understand that comment better than most.

Now, what I would like to do is to gather together some of my schoolfriends, university friends and others of that era, and maybe discuss what we remember of 1988, 1989, 1990. Was it really like that? Yes it was. How on earth did Nicholls, remember, let alone capture, the sense of emptiness of the late 1980s, of a generation who had been given 'the best' opportunities with no real idea of either how to use them or of their usefulness? It would be something of a trip down memory lane and a reflection on the choices that we made - were they any better of any worse than Emma or Dexter's, did we experience the same lack of information about what we were supposed to do with our lives?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lainy on 2 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I have to say I felt I was reading the wrong book going on how delighted and expressing how much they loved this book when they saw I was reading it. It opens in 1988, the 15th of July with Emma and Dexter, two very different people, brought together by attraction. He is a Lothario, she is a book type, into her education and passionate about the things that interest her. They couldn't be any more different, however, instead of sneaking out of her room and life they keep in touch over the years. The story spans over 20 years, always opening the next chapter on the same date, the 15th of July but in the next year and follows their progress. Dexter loves women, booze, sex, being the centre of attention and doing things that please Dexter. Emma has always loved Dexter and as their friendship grows, he has more ups and downs, becomes a celebrity, has a trail of girls, Emma is always loyal, sweet, funny and waiting in the corner to be there for him.

I did like the start of the tale, however as it went on I couldn't help but think why is she STILL waiting there for him. He treats her like a commodity, he loves her and needs to talk to her when the chips are down, otherwise it is Emma who? I suppose this is a good example of art imitating life as people do fall for and be incredibly loyal to people who treat them like that. I wanted her to tell him to grow up, have a back bone, realize she was worth more than always being second best. She had a few moments where I thought good on you but a lot of it was really irritating to read, in my opinion.

A lot focused on her mundane journey through life and the flip side was his journey of drugs, women, self pity, self importance and dramas really.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Susi Schw. on 7 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
I adored this book. It's funny and smart and so utterly heartbreaking.

Nicholls is brilliant at making characters come to life: we see them walk and hear them talk, smell their perfume and shaving cream, feel their needs, wants, their sorrow. We want to hug them, shout at them, sometimes even knock them over their heads. We KNOW them, would recognize them in a crowd. The authenticity blew me away.

I loved the dialogue. I was a happy fly on the wall listening in on all the characters' great conversations. The dialogue is head-on, not just the witticisms of the main characters, Dexter and Emma, but the smaller characters, from Dexter's tired, beautiful mother to Emma's sad sack boyfriend, Ian, the principal in Emma's school, Dexter's bubbly girlfriend Suki -- they all came to life in dialogue.

Nicholls did a great job, too, at allowing us to see and understand how we can start out one way, but end up a whole other person once life gets a hold of us. Tracing the lives of Dexter and Emma on one day in July, for twenty years, was a clever choice. In any case, it was a pleasure watching Emma and Dexter grow and mature.

This is a must read for everyone who enjoys intelligent entertainment, who likes a great love story, and who is delighted by real characters in real situations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback