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No One Belongs Here More Than You Paperback – 7 Jun 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books (7 Jun 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841959308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841959306
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.7 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 748,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"These delightful stories do that essential-but-rare story thing: they surprise. They skip past the quotidian, the merely real, to the essential, and do so with a spirit of tenderness and wonder that is wholly unique. They are (let me coin a phrase) July-esque, which is to say: infused with wonder at the things of the world" George Saunders, author of In Persuasion Nation "July is what Emily Dickinson might have become, if she had grown up in this age and become an indie filmmaker." The Washington Post"

Book Description

The most acclaimed debut story collection of 2007 now in B format.

Winner of the Frank O'Connor 2007 International Short Story Award

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kate on 27 July 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A superb collection of stories. Each story has an intriguing narrative and leaves the reader wanting more. But these are perfectly succinct, apt and beautiful stories. If you enjoy reading well-crafted contemporary writing that has edge and sensitivity this book could be very enjoyable for you too. One of my favourite 'discoveries' of the year so far.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ms. A. Mclauchlan on 5 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is a collection of short stories told from various angles and a variety of colourful and sad characters. Some stories are deeply philosophical and moving, others erotic and stark. Whilst the subject of each story is vastly different the same fluid, engaging and uncomplicated style runs throughout.
One particular story, 'This Person', is so poweful,(and the shortest I think), it stayed with me for days after first reading it.
The only criticism I can find stems from the author's strength; July's style is so elegant it is occasionally difficult to believe some of her more hardened characters would narate their stories with such delicacy. (Perhaps in itself this is meant to question our judgements of the characters?).
I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to be lost in quality fiction who does not have the time to read several 100 pages to get there... and even those who do have the time!
Instantly engaging, this book is enjoyable and sad in the right measures and I am excited to see what will come from the mind of Miranda July next!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Zanna Star on 9 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this collection for my book club, focusing on the story 'The Man on the Stairs' so my thoughts on this are followed by a broader reflection on the collection:

The Man on the Stairs is an extended snapshot in a woman's life, in which a familiar (July gives it a tired, worn out feeling, like the T-shirt the woman is wearing, doubtless ugly and shapeless, unloved, a stultifying comfort-zone) sequence of introspection culminates in an encounter that takes on a mythical (as a focus for culturally cultivated fears and a seed of exasperated, unheroic (profoundly female) courage) and symbolic (of the emotional subjugation of women). It ends with what I felt was a victory, but one so bitter and compromised that I sobbed reading it, when the woman 'expel[s] the dust of everything' this subjugation has caused her to destroy in herself, and orders the phantom, the great unintentional criminal 'out of my house'. She can only muster a whisper, but we have to start somewhere.

I cannot agree with reviewers who found July's stories 'laugh out loud funny'; I am horrified by the thought of someone laughing at the plights of her painfully unhappy protagonists. July's language stutters and chokes as each internal monologue unfolds its ugly revelations, almost as if recoiling in disgust.

Loneliness, insecurity and ineptitude are the prominent features of adulthood here, and encounters that allow the narrators to offer care or fellowship to a child emphasise a contrast with their interactions with 'normal' people who treat them with varying degrees of disdain and disinterest. I don't think July invites laughter, rather that she is tenderly drawing out poison from a wound so deep it contaminates all of our interactions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lou Ice on 8 July 2009
Format: Paperback
A very creative collection of stories, slightly on the surreal side a la Ali Smith. Reading this inspires me to write and almost everywhere I go I find ideas. Miranda July makes me look at the world with fresh eyes.

A lot of the characters are young women searching for some kind of identity, trying to find a place for themselves in this world. It's all about fitting into a system, but not fitting in. One of my favourite stories is "This person" about a girl who gets invited to an event where everybody - including her enemies - she's ever known has gathered to celebrate her and tell her how fantastic she is. In the end all she wants to do is to go home and curl up with a book. Quite a few stories deals with gay people in a very subtle, but clever way as in the story "The Sister" where an elderly man invents a sister to attract the attention of another man ...

The short story format seems to fit Miranda July. I think I'd get bored with her style if it was just one long story about the same characters. Now there are plenty of surprises keeping me interested and keen to move on to the next story. Some of them are a bit jumpy and almost too clever which makes me have to read back to get the point. But every time I go back I discover something new, so it's a good thing. It's worth reading this collection slowly, devouring Miranda July's wit. Also see the film "Me and you and everyone we know."
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By Richard Allen on 9 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback
A collection of short stories.

I sometimes think that my imagination goes into weird places, that nobody sees what I see. Richard Brautigan's mind did the same, and while much of what he wrote was dismissed as childish drivel (as much of it was), there's a beauty in his ability to go off track, and a deep, deep sadness in his writing. "So the wind won't blow it all away" is amazing and probably couldn't have been written by anyone else.

Except Miranda July. These stories aren't all great - I skipped a couple - but mostly they're unique and wonderful. A bit too much, at times - you can't eat chocolate all day - but part of this are pure bliss and hugely, hugely recommended.
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