Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

On the origin of species: A facsimile of the 1st edition Unknown Binding – 1966


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.


Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 502 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (1966)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007FG6MY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury in 1809 and was educated at Shrewsbury School, Edinburgh University and Christ's College Cambridge. He took his degree in 1831 and in the same year embarked on a five-year voyage on HMS Beagle as a companion to the captain; the purpose of the voyage was to chart the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, and to carry a chain of chronometric readings round the world.

While he was away some of his letters on scientific matters were privately published, and on his return he at once took his place among the leading men of science. In 1839 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. Most of the rest of his life was occupied in publishing the findings of the voyage and in documenting his theory of the transmutation of species. On the origin of species by means of natural selection appeared in 1859.

Darwin spent many years with his wife - his cousin Emma Wedgwood, whom he had married in 1839 - and their children at Down House in Kent. He died in 1882, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lancashire Lass on 2 Dec. 2009
Format: MP3 CD Verified Purchase
After spending many hours travelling and listening, gripped by the audiobooks `Remarkable Creatures' by Tracy Chevalier and narrated by Sarah Le Fevre then `Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species' by Sean Carroll (Author) and narrated by Jim Bond, I was eager to pop this (Origin) audiobook into my car's CD player and hit the road; how wrong and disappointed could I have been in my haste to listen to THIS audiobook.

In principle, the `Origin of Species' should make fascinating listening: I read sections of it as a biology undergrad at Uni in the early 80s. I thought an easy way to do a complete `read' would be to listen to the audiobook in half-hour or so `nuggets' twice a-day in my car.

From the moment the narrator set off his voice and reading manner grated on my nerves. It is a `dead' reading by a narrator who sounds to be a rather bored caricature of Kenneth Williams (of `Carry On' films fame): his voice is grating, irritating and gives an overall impression that he cannot really be bothered expending the breath to read aloud this seminal work. Just to increase ones irritation level to bursting point, any passages in French are grossly over-enunciated to the point that is seems the utterance each and every syllable has caused excruciating agony to the narrator: for sure, this recording was a truly excruciating experience for this listener - giving birth to a bag of razor blades would be less painful.

At first, I gave the CD the benefit of the doubt by thinking that perhaps David Case would read only the introduction and perhaps another narrator would read the main body of the book, but no, this was not to be.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 May 2010
Format: MP3 CD
This is a quick review of the book not a dissertation on Darwin or any other subject loosely related. At first I did not know what to expect. I already read " The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches". I figured the book would be similar. However I found "Origin" to be more complex and detailed.

Taking in account that recent pieces of knowledge were not available to Charles Darwin this book could have been written last week. Having to look from the outside without the knowledge of DNA or Plate Tectonics, he pretty much nailed how the environment and crossbreeding would have an effect on natural selection. Speaking of natural selection, I thought his was going to be some great insight to a new concept. All it means is that species are not being mucked around by man (artificial selection).

If you picked up Time magazine today you would find all the things that Charles said would be near impossible to find or do. Yet he predicted that it is doable in theory. With an imperfect geological record many things he was not able to find at the writing of this book have been found (according to the possibilities described in the book.)
The only draw back to the book was his constant apologizing. If he had more time and space he could prove this and that. Or it looks like this but who can say at this time. Or the same evidence can be interpreted 180 degrees different.

In the end it is worth reading and you will never look at life the same way again.

The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches (Penguin Classics)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Rossen on 29 Dec. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Charles Darwin rushed his Origin to press when he became aware that he would be pre-empted with the theory of natural selection by Alfred Russell Wallace. In the course of the following few years he reviewed the manuscript thorougly at least twice. The Third edition, with the introduction written by Jilian Huseley, is generally the standard.
Many people assume that Darwin's initial account of natural selection is so out of date that it is to be avoided in favour of more recent text books of evolutionary theory. While it is true that huge gains have been made in the one and a half centuries since the first publication of "The Origin", there is nothing in this work which is wrong. Darwin was too good a scientist and too cautious.
Some claim that Darwin admitted of the possibility of Lamarkian mechanisms. They have not read the original. Darwin knew nothing of the molecular basis of genetics, but knew that natural selection did not need a Lamarkian mechanism. He simply did not rule it out, although he found it improbable. Everything that is stated in this great classic is as true today as it was at the time of first publication.
It is also said that Charles Darwin was a lesser intellectual when compared to most other great names of science; that he was a plodder, a naturalist, a sort of gentleman stamp collector who pressed flowers into his books and barely a scientist in the contemporary sense. This is nonsense. Darwin was one of the giants of rigorous systematic thinking; the kind of rigorous thinking and critical attitude that asks the right questions and provides the capacity to answer them. Let me buttress this claim with one example.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback