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An Omelette and a Glass of Wine (Cookery Library) Paperback – 29 Mar 1990


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (29 Mar. 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140468463
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140468465
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 323,460 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"Savor her book in a comfortable chair, with a glass of sherry."--"Bon Appetit" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Elizabeth David rejuvenated the British attitude towards home cookery and is still considered to be one of the greatest food writers ever. She wrote extensively on food and wine and her enthusiasm for European cooking encouraged a revolution of the British culinary scene. Her books have remained influential since her death in 1992. This final compilation has been put together by her literary executor, Jill Norman. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer of AMAZON-UK! on 30 Sept. 2005
Format: Hardcover
HARDBACK EDITION with dust-jacket painting of 'The Eggs', (courtesy of Cedric Morris's Estate and in possession of the author) opening to 318 quality pages casually interspersed with charming black & white illustrations along with the odd photograph, this book is sure to appeal to the Elizabeth David (ED) fan.

'Here for the first time is a selection of ED's journalistic work written for a wide range of publications.
Articles, book reviews and travel pieces, they will be new to many of her readers and a delight to all for their highly personal flavour.....She writes so vividly that we can see, taste and even smell the dishes she describes....'

Back cover quote from Jane Grigson:

'Every time we begin to feel fussed by the cookery elaborators with their flashy tricks and colour photos, we can restore confidence by returning to Elizabeth David.'

From Artemis Cooper's Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David, pg 307:
'An Omelette and a Glass of Wine delighted Elizabeth's legion of fans.'

The book is spilt into bite-sized chapters, too many to mention here, but include, e.g.:

* Big Bad Bramleys
* Eating out in Provincial France 1965-1977
* Fruits de Mer
* Para Navidad
* Bruscandoli
* How Bare is your Cupboard?
* Table Talk
* Whisky in the Kitchen
* Potted Fish and Fish Pastes
* The Markets of France
* Traditional Christmas Dishes
* Isabella Beaton and her Book

sandwiched between an introduction and a 9-page index with featured recipes in a bold typeface.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a collection of her writings taken from newspapers and magazines she wrote for. The recipes are clear enough for anyone to follow, even the most amateur cook.
Extremely witty, with a scholarly approach to her research, this makes an ideal bedside table book for anybody interested in raising the stakes in the kitchen.
Many women over the years have called her name blessed, and emphatically state that she saved their marriages.
Worth every penny.
Edward Mitchell
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132 of 153 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Oct. 1999
Format: Paperback
In the UK today you could be forgiven for thinking that the era condemned by Ms David in many of her writings was a figment of someone's imagination. Post-war shortages? Nasty and ersatz flavourings recommended as ingredients in recipes? Over-complicated and over-priced dishes in mediocre restaurants? How quaintly historic.
After all, we live surrounded by food and its images. There seem to be as many magazines featuring food as there are featuring improbably-breasted women on the top-shelf of the corner shop; book-stores are piled high with recipe books by chefs who have achieved celebrity status; and the question is often not 'does your local supermarket sell balsamic vinegar,' but, 'how many kinds, and where from, exactly'?
So what is the point of reading this (or indeed any) of Elizabeth David's books? The answer is as simple as the title of the book. David's culinary lifetime was spent in encouraging the fresh, the simple and above all the fitting meal. This is much more than giving hints and recipes, or stunning yourself and your guests with exotic and hard-to-achieve perfection, it is an attitude of mind about eating and appreciating food. Lost in a welter of food from every country and culture in the world (I even discovered an Inuit recipe for seal-blubber ice-cream the other day, which is one ingredient I suspect my supermarket-of-choice has not got around to selling, at least as yet), David's often ascerbic style when she writes about bad food provides as much relish as her descriptions of what is good.
And much as I might enjoy the occasional beautifully seared loin of some imported fish I've never tried before, on a bed of ginger and lemongrass flavoured veggies, with a something-or-other salsa,(to say nothing of the possibility of seal blubber ice-cream for pud), there are those days when only the perfectly simple will do. Perhaps a beautiful and simple omelette, with of course, a glass of chilled white wine. Enjoy!
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By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback
Oh my goodness I loved this book. David writes so enticingly about her experiences with food that I found myself having to keep putting the book down and going for a snack. I have put on about half a stone since starting it, and it's been worth every pound gained. Beautiful writing that really evoke a sense of time and place. As a collection of articles, not all of them worked perfectly for me, which is why I gave it four rather than five stars, but on the whole it was an immensely pleasurable read.
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