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Oh! Suzy-Q
 
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Oh! Suzy-Q

17 Jun. 2011 | Format: MP3

£6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
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2:17
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2:11
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2:25
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1:36
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Product details

  • Release Date: 17 Jun. 2011
  • Label: Rumble
  • Copyright: (c) Pubblico Dominio
  • Total Length: 27:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005A0SEYO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 80,518 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dangerous Dave TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Aug. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Everybody needs a cut of Dale Hawkins' "Susie Q" featuring THAT RIFF from James Burton in their collection. If you've never heard of the man, he was one of those one hit wonders who appear and then disappear. However he was worth a lot more than most. A white rockabilly singer at Chess in the era when Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and co were the guys who were selling records. Although most of Hawkins' work is generally in a moderately effective rockabilly vein, "Susie Q" is different. Not dissimilar in style to the Wolf's "Smokestack Lightning" with drum and cowbell intro and good'n'dirty guitar work. Looking back at those days, "Susie Q" was a national smash but "Smokestack Lightning" was only a hit in the R&B charts. So much for fairness. Oh well.

All the tracks here have period charm and occasionally some register well above this level. Those tracks where Hawkins and backing band take more of a jump blues approach like "See you soon baboon" are amongst the best here, maybe because of Chess's greater familiarity with the approach. There's a neat and rather cool version of Jimmy Reed's "Ain't that lovin' you baby" with, according to Hawkins, Scotty Moore plus some of the Chess musicians like Willie Dixon also present. I can believe the latter but not the former - doesn't sound like Scotty to me. Dale also delivers a great version of Dixon's "My Babe" with what sounds like the same band (though I've just re-read the Notes and they say that it's Roy Buchanon on guitar on this one). There's some early swamp pop in "Lonely Nights" many, many years before anyone had heard of the term. There's a talky bit on this one and the guy doing it doesn't sound anything like Dale, queerer and queerer!
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By Peter Penn on 19 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
King o Rockabilly, King O swamp and King o Pop. Cramps and Creedence cant be wrong. Essential to any serious music collection.
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