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Octopussy [Blu-ray] [1983]


Price: £7.77 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Octopussy [Blu-ray] [1983] + A View to a Kill [Blu-ray] [1985] + The Spy Who Loved Me [Blu-ray] [1977]
Price For All Three: £25.64

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Product details

  • Actors: Roger Moore, Maud Adams, Louis Jourdan, Steven Berkoff, Kristina Wayborn
  • Directors: John Glen
  • Format: DVD+Blu-ray
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 4 Feb 2013
  • Run Time: 126 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00A8M1C2A
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,708 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

From a thrilling jet chase to a climactic countdown to nuclear disaster, James Bond is back in an electrifying adventure that pushes the limit for nonstop excitement. Roger Moore portrays the immortal action hero, perfectly capturing Agent 007’s deadly expertise, acerbic wit and sex appeal as he investigates the murder of a fellow agent who was clutching a priceless Fabergé egg at the time of his death.

From Amazon.co.uk

Roger Moore was nearing the end of his reign as James Bond when he made Octopussy, and he looks a little worn out. But the movie itself infuses some new blood into the old franchise, with a frisky pace and a pair of sturdy villains. Maud Adams--who'd also been in The Man with the Golden Gun--plays the improbably named Octopussy, while old smoothie Louis Jourdan is her crafty partner in crime. There's an island populated only by women, as well as a fantastic sequence with a hand-to-hand fight on a plane--and on top of a plane. The film even has an extra emotional punch, since this time 007 is not only following the orders of Her Majesty's Secret Service, but he is also exacting a personal revenge: a fellow double-0 agent has been killed. Two Bond films were actually released in 1983 within a few months of each other, as Octopussy was followed by Sean Connery's comeback in Never Say Never Again. The success of both pictures proved that there was still plenty of mileage left in the old licence to kill, though Moore had one more workout--A View to a Kill--before hanging it up. And that title? The franchise had already used up the titles to Ian Fleming's novels, so Octopussy was taken from a lesser-known Fleming short story. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com

On the DVD: The high standard of these 007 discs is maintained here, with another extra-packed selection. The "Inside Octopussy" documentary details the making of the movie, which faced competition from Sean Connery's Never Say Never Again, as well as being handicapped by a potentially risible title. The initial story was developed by George Macdonald Fraser, author of the "Flashman" books, whose knowledge of Indian history and locales proved invaluable. Roger Moore prevaricated about signing on as Bond, so American James Brolin was screen-tested instead. The movie also produced the worst accident of the series while filming the train sequence and the stuntman involved was hospitalised for six months. Director John Glen provides a solo commentary that reveals a wealth of technical detail and also that this is one of his favourite Bond movies. Rita Coolidge performs "All Time High", and there are also some storyboard sequences and trailers. --Mark Walker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 12 Dec 2007
Format: DVD
Facing up against a rival Bond project for the first time since You Only Live Twice - and one with Connery attached to boot - the obvious expectation was that once again the Broccoli camp would pull out all the stops and come up with one of the best Bond films yet. Instead, this is the one where they threw in the towel and began copying others rather than leading the pack.

For Your Eyes Only had gone head-to-head with Raiders of the Lost Ark and come off the worse. As a result, Octopussy shamelessly copies its market chase and truck sequences to remarkably little interest or excitement. Even the location seems second-hand - in 1982-3 you couldn't move for film crews in India, what with Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, The Far Pavilions, The Jewel in the Crown, Gandhi and Heat and Dust all reviving the Raj. Only one sequence, with a deadly yo-yo (usually heavily cut in the TV prints), works - and then only briefly.

Worse still, this one drags its feet more than any other entry in the series, with very long waits between very lacklustre setpieces. The plot is similarly uninvolving. With a similar hook to The Fourth Protocol, but nowhere near as good (and The Fourth Protocol isn't exactly a masterpiece), this is so alarmist it's a wonder Broccoli didn't hand over the producing reins to Euan Lloyd. Maud Adams makes a poor job of the title role, but Steven Berkoff is completely off the scale as the renegade Russian villain. With the diction of a demented Dalek and the subtlety of a Spitting Image puppet, it's quite an achievement to sit through any of his scenes without squirming in embarrassment.

The cheapest looking Bond film, it is doubtful that anyone would have gone to see such a geriatric action movie without the Bond name attached.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Colin G. Mclean on 3 Feb 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Roger with his one-liner quips in another brilliant film. This fills in another small gap in my ever growing Bond collection.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "vids-direct" on 26 Sep 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This is one of Roger Moore's best films in the series, providing a well balanced mix of the camp humour that we know and love him for, with enough spectacular stunts and set pieces to keep the audience on the edge of their seats as well as rolling in the ailes wuith laughter. Admittedly, the story makes absolutely no sense, as Bond chases villain Kamal Khan (Louis Jordan) across Germany and India on the case of a valuable faberge egg and a nuclear bomb primed to start World War 3. Characters events and motives are often flawed and pointless, if made clear at all to the audience. However, this is true of nearly all Bond films, so it is likely to be overlooked by most audiences. In traditional Bond style, the film does provide something for everybody. The exciting pre-credits sequence, probably the best from a technical point of view, the humour - as Bond yells like Tarzan whilst swinging through the jungle, and the developed and well scripted relationship between Bond and his leading lady. In fact it is Maud Adams, playing the eponymous 'Octopussy' who provides us with one of the series strongest female characters. She is exotic and beautiful, brave and courageous yet not physically overpowering in a masculine way. She is a match for Bond, but not simply because she can point a gun as well, like the 'female Bond' characters such as Anya Amasova and Holly Goodhead. We learn about Bond's character too, without venturing into the 'dark' family drama realm that TWINE explored.
Like all films of the Roger Moore era, Octopussy includes some of the most memorable and iconic set pieces of the series. Perhaps the most effective is the scene where Bond is menaced by a yo-yo buzz saw, or that where he must vanquish the villain's henchman whilst hold on for his life on top of a plane mid-flight.
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By FJY on 8 Oct 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film originally came out in 1983 and went head-to-head with Sean Connery's unofficial Bond film, titled Never Say Never Again. I think that Octopussy is a better film, though only slightly. It was Roger Moore's penultimate Bond film and is one of his worst. He was 56 years old when this was made and he looks it. I have never agreed with Bond being played by such an old actor, which is one reason why I didn't really like Moore's later Bond films. The plot of this film is also very complicated and just seemed to be the excuse for the cast and crew to have a free holiday in India. The Bond girls are also not very impressive in this film and Maud Adams, who plays the title character, Octopussy, must go down in history as the oldest Bond girl in the series. It also has some very silly sequences and some very cartoonish, pantomime villains, the worst offender being Steven Berkoff's renegade Russian general, who is very over-the-top and exaggerated in every way. I just could not take this film seriously at all, especially with it following on the coat tails of the much superior For Your Eyes Only. This isn't quite the worst film in the series, but it comes a close second. Two stars from me. This film gives excellent proof why Roger Moore should have retired as Bond much sooner. A disappointment on every level.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Timelord007 TOP 100 REVIEWER on 8 May 2014
Format: DVD
Dvd Info.
Region 2.
Ratio 16.9/2.35:1.
Running time 125 minutes approx.
Remastered.

Trivia.
1)Maud Adam's second apperance in a Bond film her first was as Andrea Anders in The Man With The Golden Gun.
2)This was released the same year as non canon Bond film Never Say Never Again, Octopussy won out earning $187,000,000 compared to Never Say Never Again $160,000,000.
3)James Brolin was once against nearly cast as Bond who's screen test is seen on the dvd but in the end Roger Moore agreed to play Bond & producer's went with him as this film was competing with non canon Bond Never Say Never Again with Sean Connery reprising the role of James Bond on that movie.
4)Q appears to be a more active participant in this mission & even gets the girls.
5)Rutger Hauer was offered the part of Orlov, He turned it down.
6)Steven Berkoff (Orlov) also appeared as a Russian Commander in Rambo :First Blood Part 2.
7)Faye Dunway & Sybil Danning were considered for the role of Octopussy.
8)Stuntman Martin Grace who was Roger Moore's stunt double injured his back hitting a concrete bollard as he held on to the train for his very life due to the train had overran the track in a non assessed area, The stuntman spent six month's in traction yet returned in Moore's swansong as 007 in A View To A Kill once again as Moore's stunt double.
9)Robert Brown replaces Bernard Lee as "M" as the actor died during the production of For Your Eyes Only.
10)The movies title was a concern for the producers yet the BBFC passed the movie a PG without any need for cuts or alterations.

Synopsis.
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