or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Occupy (Occupied Media Pamphlet) [Paperback]

Noam Chomsky
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 5.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 30 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details


Product details

  • Paperback: 125 pages
  • Publisher: Zuccotti Park Press; Open Magazine special ed edition (May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1884519016
  • ISBN-13: 978-1884519017
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 10.7 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 830,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By S Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
"Occupy" is a selection of speeches (as well as one interview) made by veteran radical Noam Chomsky at Occupy events in the U.S. late last year.

The speeches are a mixture of Chomsky putting events into context, an extremely brief history of the Neoliberal era (the "Thirty Years of Class War" referred to in the title of this review), a eulogy for the late Howard Zinn (of A People's History of the United States fame) and some reluctant but sensible advice on avoiding common pitfalls and difficulties while organising and carrying forward the Occupy movement. A guide on what to do if your arrested at an occupy event in the U.S. (compiled by the National Lawyers Guild) has been helpfully included, and makes interesting reading even for those to whom it is not directly relevant.

This is a fine short (probably not much more than 10,000 words in total) collection, though readers may wish to skip it for (or subsequently move on to) some of his more recent and substantial works such as Hopes and Prospects, or return to his earlier classics such as Deterring Democracy, Year 501: The Conquest Continues or Manufacturing Consent. An interesting book for readers wishing to learn more about Occupy as well as the protests across Europe and the uprisings in the Arab World (which Chomsky touches upon) could do far worse than reading Paul Masons Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth it just for the Zinn memorial 2 May 2012
By Kropotkin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I bought the book earlier this afternoon, and just finished it. While it is rather short (about 120 pages), I think it's a worthwhile purchase for a few different reasons.
One: The title of my review says it all- some fresh perspective on Howard Zinn! Zinn is discussed at length; primarily dealing with theoretical interpretations of how he would've approached the Occupy movement. Of course, Zinn isn't here to explain himself, but Chomsky does an admirable job of trying to relate Zinn and 'Occupy'. Agree or disagree with Chomsky; the fact is that you still are getting a fresh approach on one of the most beloved historians of our time.
Two: Chomsky can come across as a simple and boring read. This is mainly due to the fact that his written works are usually transcripts of prior speeches that he's made. Therefore, he repeats certain points numerous times, and his overall argument can seem disjointed or a bit sloppily put together. My advice is to read him as if he is speaking in front of you. This works great sometimes, and other times it is still a chore to get to his overall argument, but once you do, the argument is almost always compelling.
Having said that, he still delivers a relevant argument for the need of 'Occupy' and movements similar to it. I think most people interested in the book are going to be familiar with his politics, and those of the larger movement. And this is only the first of a series examining the Occupy movement, and all are printed by Zuccotti Park Press. So if you are looking for a way to support the movement and show Solidarity, then I highly recommend that you read this book!
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "the First Major Public Response to Thirty Years of Class War" 3 May 2012
By S Wood - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"Occupy" is a selection of speeches (as well as one interview) made by veteran radical Noam Chomsky at Occupy events in the U.S. late last year.

The speeches are a mixture of Chomsky putting events into context, an extremely brief history of the Neoliberal era (the "Thirty Years of Class War" referred to in the title of this review), a eulogy for the late Howard Zinn (of A People's History of the United States fame) and some reluctant but spot on advice on the pitfalls and difficulties of organising and carrying forward the Occupy movement. A guide on what to do if your arrested at an occupy event in the U.S. (compiled by the National Lawyers Guild) has been helpfully included, and makes interesting reading even for those to whom it is not directly relevant.

This is a fine short (probably not much more than 10,000 words in total) collection, though readers may wish to skip it for (or subsequently move on to) some of his more recent and substantial works such as Hopes and Prospects, or return to his earlier classics such as Deterring Democracy, Year 501: The Conquest Continues or Manufacturing Consent. An interesting book for readers wishing to learn more about Occupy as well as the protests across Europe and the uprisings in the Arab World (which Chomsky touches upon) could do far worse than reading Paul Masons Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions.
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE BLUEPRINT 3 May 2012
By MK - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Simply put, the "Noam Chomsky Occupy" pamphlet is the blueprint for the global Occupy movement. This pamphlet can easily be the guide that occupiers, professors, activists and those seeking change can use to constantly navigate the uncharted territory. "Noam Chomsky Occupy" offers perspective and strategic vision.
I am very honored to be a small part of this powerful and brilliant pamphlet! It is my guide!

Mikal Kamil
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars sort of light on substance. 16 Feb 2013
By J. T. Pilonero - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is not very deep - just sort of an action guideline for folks in line already, not a strong philosophical piece.
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chomsky on Occupy 19 May 2012
By Chris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This small book is a very quick read. It is a pamphlet sized book featuring 5 speeches and interviews with --and a short essay by--Noam Chomsky about the Occupy movement. It features Chomsky exhorting folks about how to build on the foundations laid by Occupy to build a far more just, equitable and democratic society than we Americans currently have. It is a very short book and the arguments are sometimes repetitive but it is very thought provoking and intelligent (as Chomsky's works always are).

According to Chomsky the Occupy movement is the first substantial resistance nationwide to the neoliberal economic policies that have been oppressing us since the 70's. Since the 70's incomes have declined or stagnated for a large majority of Americans. While working Americans enjoyed a substantial benefit from the economic growth of the 50's and 60's, the benefits of economic growth since the 70's, have, according to Chomsky, been heavily concentrated in the top one tenth of one percent of the wealthiest Americans. Manufacturers have left for greater profits overseas and the economy has become increasingly reliant on the financial industry. Corporate profits are booming thanks to "greater worker insecurity"--as Chomsky quotes Alan Greenspan as saying in 1997--which means that workers are too beaten down to demand a greater share of the national wealth by striking for higher wages and benefits. Americans have been forced to keep their head above water by taking on a huge amount of debt and working longer hours. Meanwhile an 8 trillion dollar housing bubble kept the economy afloat during the Bush years as the tech bubble sustained the Clinton economy before it. Deregulation, purchased by the campaign contributions and lobbying of the financial industry, allowed the rich to achieve never before seen levels of wealth as they speculated in toxic financial instruments and real estate. But the housing bubble popped in 2008 and the wealth of tens of millions of Americans was destroyed. Now, social spending is being slashed while the US government spends as much on its military budget as every other country in the world combined.

According to Chomsky, the Occupy movement has provided an alternative model to our corporate dominated society. In the Occupy movement, policies are discussed, debated and formulated in general assemblies. In Occupy, politics does not consist of corporate bribery of politicians or listening to speeches and commercials where politicians pretend to care about ordinary Americans. Rather, it consists of ordinary people formulating policy themselves. In a just society, workers should control economic enterprises for their own benefit. In a just society, according to Chomsky, control of General Motors would have been placed under the control of its workforce and communities affected by GM's operations. Under the democratic control of workers and communities, GM plants could possibly have been reconstituted to produce more energy efficient technologies and transportation, for example high speed rail. The United States is far behind other countries in its development of high speed rail. But Chomsky notes that the Obama administration did not want to reconstitute the bankrupt auto industry for the purpose of allowing American workers to produce high speed rail (with stimulus money) but instead went searching in Europe for firms to do so. The Obama administration wants to protect corporate profits but not promote the utilization of America's resources for the needs of its ordinary people.

The Occupy movement, with its model of cooperative living and solidarity, presents a potentially powerful model for ordinary Americans. The Occupy movement can possibly mobilize many more people by allowing ordinary Americans to control its direction and shape the movement to their everyday concerns. Polling data shows widespread sympathy with the beliefs of Occupy. Chomsky suggests that ordinary people can be mobilized to the Occupy movement by causes as diverse as putting in a new traffic light in a town or abolishing corporate personhood and money in politics. According to Chomsky, movements by communities and workers to take over workplaces are another possible cause to be exploited by Occupy. Chomsky cites the example of community members and US Steel workers attempting to buy a company factory threatened with closure in Youngstown Ohio in the late 70's and transform it into a worker run complex. They didn't succeed but the movement spawned the creation of hundreds of worker owned enterprises in Ohio. Chomsky says that a similar movement within the last few years took place at a plant in suburban Boston. United Electrical Worker members tried to organize the purchase of this plant to transform it into a worker owned facility--when it was on the verge of being shut down--but the company refused to sell. This effort in Massachusetts ended before the Occupy movement arose but Chomsky suggests that Occupy might have created a more favorable outcome for the cause. This movement of worker owned enterprises in places like Ohio is something that I have never heard about before and I wish Chomsky would have elaborated a little more about it.

Chomsky heavily stresses the lessons in the life and historical work of his old comrade Howard Zinn that people trying to build on the successes of Occupy can learn from.

The last chapter is a short Q & A provided by the National Lawyers Guild to help Occupy protestors understand the basics of dealing with the police.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback