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Object-Oriented Programming in ColdFusion [Kindle Edition]

Matt Gifford
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £24.99
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Book Description

This book is a fast-paced tutorial to developing ColdFusion applications using an object-oriented programming approach. Complete with code examples that can be altered and applied to your application and careful explanations, this book will guide you through your first interaction with object-oriented programming within your ColdFusion applications. If you are a web developer wanting to implement object-oriented programming with ColdFusion, then this book is for you. If your goal is to get a good grounding in the basics of object-oriented programming concepts, this book is perfect for you. No prior knowledge of object-oriented programming is expected, but basic knowledge of ColdFusion development skills is assumed.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2589 KB
  • Print Length: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (13 Oct. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0057N4B4G
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #896,581 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Introductory material 15 Dec. 2010
Format:Paperback
This book is a much-needed gentle introduction to ColdFusion Components and Object-Oriented Programming. The book assumes no background in CFCs or OOP so it starts by introducing the tag and script syntax forms of CFCs and, as the book unfolds, basic Object-Oriented techniques and patterns are introduced gradually with extensive code samples. The book doesn't go very deep - it's only 167 pages, after all - but it covers domain objects, data access and data gateway and service layers; it covers access control, inheritance, polymorphism and object relationships (composition, aggregation etc).

I have no complaints about Gifford's grasp of the technical issues nor his ability to teach the topic - Packt's editors need to be called out for a number of very strange phrases in the text and a lot of inconsistencies in the language through the book, as well as inconsistent typography in examples (esp. capitalization). I've seen similar issues in other Packt books (John Farrar's two ColdFusion Tutorial books, for example). That said, it doesn't detract a great amount from the overall good points of the book (it's just a bit annoying).

If you're totally new to CFCs, this is a great book for you. If you're using CFCs already but find a lot of the terminology confusing, this is a great book for you as well. If you think you're doing OOP but haven't gotten your head fully around beans and DAOs and gateways and services, this book will have some insights for you as well (but perhaps not $40 worth). It's a really good introductory book - and it's long overdue!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Concise and to the point 5 Jan. 2011
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you already have experience of ColdFusion and a are looking for help on structuring your code then this is the book to get.

It will take you through the process or creating objects (CFCs) and get you used to the OOP style of separating the code from the detail in order to create flexible re-usable components.

The book mostly utilises ColdFusion 8, but also has a few useful examples of creating objects with ColdFusion 9 (ie pure scripting without the ColdFusion tags for cleaner more concise code).

I would have liked this to have been written a couple of years ago, but better late than never.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Worth while for OOP newbies 2 Feb. 2011
Format:Paperback
Not a bad little book.
Not much for someone doing OOP stuff already but plenty if your getting into doing stuff like DAO, Gateways etc for the first time.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Introductory material 15 Dec. 2010
By Sean A Corfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is a much-needed gentle introduction to ColdFusion Components and Object-Oriented Programming. The book assumes no background in CFCs or OOP so it starts by introducing the tag and script syntax forms of CFCs and, as the book unfolds, basic Object-Oriented techniques and patterns are introduced gradually with extensive code samples. The book doesn't go very deep - it's only 167 pages, after all - but it covers domain objects, data access and data gateway and service layers; it covers access control, inheritance, polymorphism and object relationships (composition, aggregation etc).

I have no complaints about Gifford's grasp of the technical issues nor his ability to teach the topic - Packt's editors need to be called out for a number of very strange phrases in the text and a lot of inconsistencies in the language through the book, as well as inconsistent typography in examples (esp. capitalization). I've seen similar issues in other Packt books (John Farrar's two ColdFusion Tutorial books, for example). That said, it doesn't detract a great amount from the overall good points of the book (it's just a bit annoying).

If you're totally new to CFCs, this is a great book for you. If you're using CFCs already but find a lot of the terminology confusing, this is a great book for you as well. If you think you're doing OOP but haven't gotten your head fully around beans and DAOs and gateways and services, this book will have some insights for you as well (but perhaps not $40 worth). It's a really good introductory book - and it's long overdue!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hands Down Best Intro to OOP with ColdFusion 11 Jan. 2011
By Denard D. Springle IV - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Matt has taken one of the most mystical topics with hard to cobble together bits of information about Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) in ColdFusion and put it all together into a single cohesive resource that will completely change the way you develop applications with ColdFusion. For years there have been a handful of us who sought out the practices and patterns of Object-Oriented Programming through examples in Java and other languages and implemented a variety of frameworks built around some of these fundamentals. Now, every ColdFusion programmer has a handy desk reference that goes under the hood of developing Object-Oriented Programming in ColdFusion with a grand presentation of both theory and practical application. Taking the reader from the core concepts of ColdFusion components through the use of components as objects gives even the novice ColdFusion developer all the information needed to start writing Object-Oriented applications. From beans, data access operations, gateways, services and the underlying principles of singleton's, inheritance and polymorphism to the application framework that underpins core Object-Oriented Programming functionality in ColdFusion, this book covers all the topics you need to get started. If you're at all serious about writing Object-Oriented ColdFusion applications, in any version of ColdFusion MX or higher, then this is the one resource you'll want to have on your desk - a to the point cookbook on how to implement Java style Object-Oriented Programming in your ColdFusion development.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not great 25 Nov. 2010
By H - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Pros:
- intro to CFC Bean / DAO / Gateway / Service
- suitable for beginners writing their first CRUD app in CF.
- includes some CF9 features like generated getter/setter

Cons:
- no intro to ORM
- no intro to MVC / DI / Unit testing Framework (ColdBox's book does a better job)
- kind of short, expected more...
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required reading for any CF developer! 17 Jun. 2011
By R. Hiner - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Coldfusion is a very different product than it was in the 90's. It's fast, it connects to anything and everything, and its a great server platform for a rich client style application. That said, there are right ways and wrong ways to develop in ColdFusion. This book will get you going in the right direction.
4.0 out of 5 stars Best ColdFusion resource for getting started into OOP 30 Jun. 2014
By Jose Galdamez - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book does a great job of covering well known patterns and OOP paradigms in ColdFusion. By the end the reader should have a fairly good grasp on CFC instantiation, CFC design, constructors, the pseudo constructor and why to avoid it, information hiding, CFC scopes, inheritance, and design patterns such as beans, DAOs, gateways, and services. I started using all of the design patterns mentioned back in 2010. I learned from watching presentations, studying existing code, and trying them out on new projects. I would've much rather had one go-to source like this one. Reading it in 2014 was a great refresher either way.

I thought the section on services was the best one. The analogy of getting up to go to the kitchen and all the various processes involved got me to understand the concept better. I'm not sure if this was mentioned but the one important rule about services is to keep all business logic in the child objects. Services are supposed to be lean.

I sort of wish Matt would have covered more regarding ORM and how it can replace the need for a lot of the boilerplate code in the patterns mentioned above. While there is a lot of debate regarding ORM's viability and Adobe ColdFusion's implementation, it does essentially serve as a wrapper for much of the same functionality provided by beans, gateways, and services. The ORM object will have getters and setters to protect data (bean), one can save one record at a time via ORM (DAO), and you can always get back multiple records via the various ORM query methods (gateway). I'm not arguing for a comprehensive look at ColdFusion ORM since there is a book on that already. I'm thinking a few paragraphs would've sufficed.

At the very least there should have been a mention of code generation tools like Illudium PU-36 Code Generator. What I don't like about these OOP design patterns is they require massive amounts of boilerplate code that are a bore to write by hand. There's also the downside to constantly updating the code if you're in the middle of building out a new schema. Code generation tools look at existing tables and automatically build out all the necessary objects.

I also would've much rather seen more of the code samples in CFScript instead of the tag syntax. Perhaps at the time of writing tag syntax was more universally supported since CF 9 had just introduced nearly complete CFScript support. I read this book on the Kindle Paperwhite and the iPad 4, and the tag syntax just fits poorly within the narrow width. I imagine this is also a problem on the print version.

Overall, I think this book will benefit procedural programmers the most since it teaches you how to properly separate and organize various aspects of your application code. It also helps explain some of the jargon you'll come across when encountering OOP architectures for the first time.
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