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OSGi and Equinox: Creating Highly Modular Java Systems (Eclipse Series)
 
 

OSGi and Equinox: Creating Highly Modular Java Systems (Eclipse Series) [Kindle Edition]

Jeff McAffer , Paul VanderLei , Simon Archer
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

A Hands-On Guide to Equinox and the OSGi Framework

In OSGI and Equinox: Creating Highly Modular Java™ Systems , three leading experts show developers—for the first time—exactly how to make the most of these breakthrough technologies for building highly modular dynamic systems.

You’ll quickly get started with Eclipse bundle tooling, create your first OSGi-based system, and move rapidly to sophisticated production development. Next, you’ll master best practices and techniques for creating systems with exceptional modularity and maintainability. You’ll learn all about OSGi’s Declarative Services and how to use them to solve a wide variety of real-world problems. Finally, you’ll see everything that you’ve learned implemented in a complete case study project that takes you from early prototype through application delivery.

For every Eclipse developer, regardless of previous experience, this book

  • Combines a complete hands-on tutorial, online sample code at every step, and deep technical dives for working developers
  • Covers the OSGi programming model, component development, OSGi services, Eclipse bundle tooling, server-side Equinox, and much more
  • Offers knowledge, guidance, and best practices for overcoming the complexities of building modular systems
  • Addresses practical issues ranging from integrating third-party code libraries to server-side programming
  • Includes a comprehensive case study that goes beyond prototyping to deliver a fully refined
    and refactored production system

Whatever your application, industry, or problem domain, if you want to build state-of-the-art software systems with OSGi and Equinox, you will find this book to be an essential resource.

From the Back Cover

<>A Hands-On Guide to Equinox and the OSGi Framework

 In OSGI and Equinox: Creating Highly Modular Java™ Systems, three leading experts show developers—for the first time—exactly how to make the most of these breakthrough technologies for building highly modular dynamic systems.


You’ll quickly get started with Eclipse bundle tooling, create your first OSGi-based system, and move rapidly to sophisticated production development. Next, you’ll master best practices and techniques for creating systems with exceptional modularity and maintainability. You’ll learn all about OSGi’s Declarative Services and how to use them to solve a wide variety of real-world problems. Finally, you’ll see everything that you’ve learned implemented in a complete case study project that takes you from early prototype through application delivery.


For every Eclipse developer, regardless of previous experience, this book

  • Combines a complete hands-on tutorial, online sample code at every step, and deep technical dives for working developers
  • Covers the OSGi programming model, component development, OSGi services, Eclipse bundle tooling, server-side Equinox, and much more
  • Offers knowledge, guidance, and best practices for overcoming the complexities of building modular systems
  • Addresses practical issues ranging from integrating third-party code libraries to server-side programming
  • Includes a comprehensive case study that goes beyond prototyping to deliver a fully refined
    and refactored production system
Whatever your application, industry, or problem domain, if you want to build state-of-the-art software systems with OSGi and Equinox, you will find this book to be an essential resource.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 8248 KB
  • Print Length: 460 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (15 Feb 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0037RDPFK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #468,836 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
By Erik076
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I bought this book because it was the first published book on OSGI (apart from a preliminary early access version of OSGI in Action. My main aim was to dive into OSGI. The book does this, but it is too much focussed on Eclipse and does not go that much into OSGI.

Some examples:
* There are alternatives for building OSGI bundles (maven, maven-bundle-plugin) but these are not discussed. Instead an eclipse centric approach is chosen.
* The junit test example is clumsy and far inferior to a pax-exam method of testing
* It introduces some GUI framework (Crust) out of the blue and starts creating a cool application based on that. At that point I disconnected because I want to know about OSGI and not about some framework that is built on top of OSGI.
* The basic architecture of OSGI is not discussed (module, lifecycle, service, and security layers).
* It contains a lot of descriptions about Eclipse user interfaces.

All in all I was a bit disappointed, but if your are (as the book information says) an Eclipse developer and you consider eclipse the center of the world then this book might be for you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Before judging "OSGi and Equinox: Creating Highly Modular Java Systems" from the point of my review I should point out that, contrary to the book's authors' suggestions, I did not follow it along while live coding. The book was vital to my OSGi understanding, but for the authors doing is often more important than the reading alone (of which I'm a strong proponent, too). I've already set myself out for the other reading of the book focusing on live development with Eclipse and I'm deeply sure my opinion will surely change.

This is the book that introduced me to OSGi in a more practical approach where understanding sample code of the Toast application is as important as the reading itself. I enjoyed its reading, but it was a bit annoying when many pages referred to the development aspects of OSGi focusing on code while I was merely reading along with no Eclipse in front of me. It was the most frustrating in the part 2 of the book which assumed Eclipse IDE ready and live coding as reading. I read with no coding, but it doesn't take long to find out it was not the authors' intentions.

The chapter "About This Book" eloquently describes what the book covers. Just read the chapter and jump to appropriate chapters or sections of choice. There's the natural, writing order of explaining the OSGi inner workings, but a more seasoned OSGi developer can use the book as a reference for the different parts of OSGi ecosystem without losing much while skipping different sections. I found the book heavily focused on the development side of OSGi with Eclipse PDE.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book. Good reference for OSGi best practices. 26 Jun 2010
By Daniel Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Summary: This is a well executed and detailed explanation of how to develop modular Java systems and applications using OSGi and Equinox. It uses the development of an easy to follow example application, called Toast, as the vehicle to explain OSGi theory and practice using Equninox. One of the main themes of the book is the whys and hows of OSGi Declarative Services. In general, it is a good book for OSGi beginners, but familiarity with Eclipse is a perquisite. Advanced developers will find it to be a good resource and example of OSGi best practices.

The writing was clear and well edited; you could tell that it had been through many revisions to get it to its current polished state. The step-by-step instructions for the examples was at the right level for me, with enough detail to get things to work without being overly long. For instance, I find that I quickly get the concept of the example, but then I like to be given the details of what to name things and exactly what else to do, so that I can concentrate on the example and keep things moving along.

Another bonus that comes with the book is an Eclipse plug-in that can be installed from the web which includes the source code of all of the examples organized by chapter. It manifests itself as a special view in Eclipse that lists all of the example code. One can use this view to populate the workspace with the example code from any chapter, or, to compare the current workspace contents to the book's example. I found this last feature to be a great help as there were several times where things were not working and I was stuck for a solution. By simply comparing my manually entered version of the example code with the chapter's reference version, I quickly found the small differences that were causing problems and was quickly on my way. This ability is the next best thing to having the authors look over your shoulder and tell you what you did wrong.

I did run into a few issues with the book. There were several times where the steps provided to produce the example code were not complete. These were minor things like a missing dependency specification or in one case a default value produced by a wizard that needed to be explicitly set to something else. Mostly, these were no problem to correct.

Basically, I wasn't disappointed, this is a good book that delivers on what it promises.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely a GEM 4 April 2010
By Okur Yazar - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I've never learned starting with a wizard-generated code and then trying to decipher what it does with the help of authors explainations on that code. Many authors may still believe that, this is the right and concrete way, but it never worked for me. I'm theory oriented. I must have a goal at very early stages, and I want to know answers of all my WHY-questions. Otherwise I'll give up. Actually, I want to write (not to generate) code and have full control on it. Tools are there to easily modify and manage the code, if and only if I completely know and understand the purpose. This book DOES NOT start with wizard code. Further it chooses a very smart starting point. Very likely, a programmer started his eclipse plug-in and RCP adventure as being an eclipse JDT user. Thus, he knows programming java and uses eclipse as IDE, he deploys his applications in jar's etc... And this book takes you to the journey exactly at this point. It starts with ordinary java classes, and converts them to plug-ins and step by step ports this very simple code to a component based profi application.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars detailed tutorial for OSGi/Equinox 11 April 2010
By Jeanne Boyarsky - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"OSGi and Equinox"is the first "Eclipse Series" book I have read. It has three parts.

The first part is an introduction. The brief history shows how OSGI came to be and the benefits. It had excellent visuals to see the concepts being presented.

The second part is an extended tutorial to create the TOAST application from scratch. The tutorial assumes you've never used Eclipse before so it was a bit slow to get started. I would have liked seeing how to create a project/class as an appendix. There were a ton of IDE screenshots so I certainly felt like I was doing the tutorial with the author. That style got a little dry/repetitive; maybe because I wasn't following along on a computer. Many concepts were covered and there were good tips and warnings to the reader. I was a bit puzzled why the tests are using easyMock with Java 5 and Junit 4. I'll be sure to ask the author when he is at JavaRanch the week of April 20th.

The third part is "deep dives" into specific concepts. This section was less tutorial-y and I liked it better. It includes patterns, the lifecycle and crosscutting concerns. There is also an "other"/kitchen sink chapter that contains numerous tips and tracks.

Overall, I did learn a lot from the book. If you are looking to learn OSGi/Equinox, I think it is good to read.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Great Approach to Learning OSGi But Very Poorly Supported 5 Nov 2013
By Conor J. Haines - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As a book outlining the concepts behind OSGi and Equinox it is useful, but the bulk of the book is dedicated to tutorial work. I agree with the approach, coding yourself is far and away the best method to learn these concepts. However, the tutorials are no longer functional for several reasons: installation of supporting tools (specifically a "samples manager") is no longer possible with new versions of Eclipse. This can be resolved by the reader after much googling of compilation errors, but with no direct support from the books website. Additionally, several critical and non-trivial steps are "left as an exercise for the reader". Also, the samples provided no longer function in the latest versions of Eclipse, with no support from the authors on-line.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Totally unsupported book. 23 May 2014
By C. Reed - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I like the overall approach the book uses in working with examples and building up step by step. There are some other books available that are more steeped in theory, but I believe that hands on is always the best way to learn. So I was pretty psyched when I read the table of contents..should be a quick couple of days to really come up to speed on this technology.

However....
the book website is moribund , links are dead. The examples that can be found will not load into a current Eclipse environment
They haven't been updated in 3 and a half years.
I am probably late to the game in looking at this technology, but I don't believe that Amazon (or anyone else) should sell this book for full price when the basic premise of the book is false.
If you can't get the samples to work in a current Eclipse environment...what is the point?
So, I am googling for information...which is exactly what I would have done if I had never wasted money on this book.
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In many ways OSGi can be thought of as an extension to the Java programming language that allows package visibility and package dependency constraints to be specified at development time and enforced at runtime. &quote;
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A bundle is typically implemented as a JAR, but with added identity and dependency information; that is, bundles are self-describing JARs. &quote;
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The classes that implement the service, being implementation details, generally are not contained in packages that are exported. &quote;
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