or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

ORANG PENDEK: Sumatra's Forgotten Ape [Paperback]

Richard Freeman
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 13.99
Price: 13.53 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 0.46 (3%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Friday, 22 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Book Description

1 Nov 2011
W e are impressed by big things; dinosaurs, whales, rhinos, super-tankers, skyscrapers. Mention mystery apes to the man in the street and he will imagine bipedal hairy giants, 10ft tall. Indeed most reports of such things speak of massive animals; the yeti, the yeren, the sasquatch, and the yowie. But for every bigfoot there is a littlefoot. Stories of little hairy men are widespread - but none are as famous as Sumatra's orang-pendek.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 332 pages
  • Publisher: cfz (1 Nov 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905723822
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905723829
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 15.4 x 23 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 744,660 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUMATRA'S MYSTERY APE 29 Feb 2012
The Orang-pendek is supposed to be a previously unknown species of great ape, similar to but distinct from the Orang-outang. It is bipedal and walks upright. Although strong and fearsome-looking, it avoids contact with humans, aided by the inhospitable jungle in which it lives.

The Orang-pendek lives in remote parts of Sumatra, where it has been spotted more than once, both by locals and European explorers, none of whom had a camera or a rifle handy at the time. In this interesting and well-written book, the famous cryptozoologist Dr Richard Freeman builds up a modestly solid case that the Orang-pendek really exists. The descriptions of it are numerous and impressively similar, and it would not be illogical for such a creature to exist. Analysis of hair specimens found have not provided conclusive proof of its existence, however, and there are some Orang-outangs inhabiting the same parts of Sumatra.

This book is good value for money at 13.99, and a must for every person interested in cryptozoology and primatology.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Freeman explores Indonesian enigma 26 July 2012
Richard Freeman has done what few people have - chased his cryptozoological quarries to all four corners of the globe with a tenaciousness and singlemindedness shared by few.

This book is the culmination of his many years' worth of expeditions to the Indonesian island of Sumatra in search of the so-called Orang pendek (literally meaning 'short person' in the native tongue), thought to be an unknown species of ape and reported since the Dutch first set foot on indonesian soil and - temporarily - claimed the territory as their own.

Richard has spoken to just about anyone and everyone who has had anything to do with tracking this Southern Hemisphere enigma. And - I should declare this upfront - I myself have accompanied him on one of his expeditions and can attest it's not for the faint-hearted (or the unfit!).

While concrete definitive evidence of the animal remains, for now, elusive, it can't be far off. On an island that still harbours an amazing diversity of creatures that includes leopards, tigers, orangutans, rhinos and many others, an undiscovered species of ape isn't as far-fetched as it might otherwise sound.

I wholeheartedly recommend this book - the most comprehensive study to date on the Orang pendek.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of cryptozoology's Holy Grails 26 July 2012
By Rebecca Lang - Published on Amazon.com
Richard Freeman has done what few people have - chased his cryptozoological quarries to all four corners of the globe with a tenaciousness and singlemindedness shared by few.

This book is the culmination of his many years' worth of expeditions to the Indonesian island of Sumatra in search of the so-called Orang pendek (literally meaning 'short person' in the native tongue), thought to be an unknown species of ape and reported since the Dutch first set foot on indonesian soil and - temporarily - claimed the territory for their own.

Richard has spoken to just about anyone and everyone who has had anything to do with tracking this Southern Hemisphere enigma. And - I should declare this upfront - I myself have accompanied him on one of his expeditions and can attest it's not for the faint-hearted (or the unfit!).

While concrete definitive evidence of the animal remains, for now, elusive, it can't be far off. On an island that still harbours an amazing diversity of creatures that includes leopards, tigers, orangutans, rhinos and many others, an undiscovered species of ape isn't as far-fetched as it might otherwise sound.

I wholeheartedly recommend this book - the most comprehensive study to date on the Orang pendek.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great guide to orang-pendek. 3 Dec 2012
By Tartarus - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Orang-pendek is a mysterious short bipedal ape thought to live in the jungles of Sumatra. It is one of the most likely cryptozoological creatures not only because of the high number of clear and concise reports from reliable eyewitnesses and numerous findings of physical traces the creatures leave, but also because of the fact that the environment in question possesses excellent conditions for such a creature and the local orang-utans represent clear examples of relatives to the creatures.

The first part of the book describes orang-pendek and discusses various eyewitness reports.
The second part of the book discusses various similar creatures reported from all over the world. Some are, as the author acknowledges, of questionable authenticity but many others are quite well supported.
The third part of the book describes the author's own trips to Sumatra in search of the orang-pendek. Interestingly enough, a couple of his companions actually saw an orang-pendek and the team managed to successfully collect what appeared to be orang-pendek hairs.

The author considers the orang-pendek to be an undiscovered species of orang-utan, that evolved a ground dwelling lifestyle and bipedal gait. Near the end of the book there are some brief speculations on the evolutionary events that led to orang-pendek. I find the author's reasoning to be quite sound and share his view that the orang-pendek is most likely a type of orang-utan. Undiscovered orang-utan species are probably also the most likely candidates for the identity for a number of other Asian mystery primates, such as the yeh-teh (common yeti), as well.
Contrary to some opinions, it is extremely unlikely orang-pendek is a surviving Homo floresiensis, as beyond its bipedal gait its features are not at all human-like. However, the book does briefly discuss another mystery creature from Sumatra called the orang-kardil, who are far more human-like in both appearance and behaviour (they, for instance, make tools and fire and live in small tribes). It is possible that the orang-kardil are in fact a small surviving population of Homo floresiensis.

One of the most interesting things in the book is the final appendix, where the hair samples from Sumatra, thought to have come from an orang-pendek, are compared to the hair of various primates and non-primates from both Sumatra and elsewhere. As it turned out the hair collected was different from all the hairs it was compared to. This provides further support for the idea that there could well be an undiscovered ape species living in the jungles of Sumatra.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How To Find An Ape-Man 24 Mar 2014
By Robert D. Schneck - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Orang-Pendek: Sumatra’s Forgotten Ape, is Richard Freeman’s account of several expeditions made to Indonesia in search of small hairy ape-men; like most products of the CFZ Press, however, it’s not that simple. You are getting two books; the first is a 200 page global survey of undersized, mostly hairy, “littlefoots”. The second concerns the expeditions, and both are supplemented by more or less relevant, but interesting, appendices.

Sumatra’s jungles are not the wild paradises Ivan Sanderson used to write about, but sadder places, being chewed relentlessly away by coffee plantations and lumbering; the food is wretched, traveling back and forth tedious or terrifying, and moving through the jungle so physically demanding that the author vomits from exhaustion. This is not a Boy’s Own adventure, but a slog through leech-infested mud, yet the researchers and their guides get results, including hairs, footprints, hand-prints, and even a sighting; an orang-pendek in a tree apparently trying to avoid being seen.

The reader is left with the impression of a rare but perfectly real animal, the existence of which could be proven by a concerted, reasonably funded, effort (of course, a lot of cryptids give that impression). While its discovery would be of tremendous importance, the orang-pendek also seems like a rather scruffy creature compared to Sumatra’s awe-inspiring tigers. This is consistent with the matter-of-fact tone of the book, which, despite everything, will make you want to go orang-pendek hunting.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback