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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 1997
Want to be disturbed, want to risk a difficult self-evaluation, want to endorse some uncomfortable facts about this Country's History? I guess it will be decided on why you read. Mr. Spence, "I say we must celebrate the verdict in the Simpson case, and honor the jurors for their wisdom and their unappreciated gift of freedom they have delivered to us". The first time through that statement, hopefully, will stir some emotion within anyone regardless of their color, or opinion that, "justice was aborted in this case..." And then after the emotion has passed, sit back and think about all Mr. Spence has written, and how you as an individual have any sort of race bias within you. I do not consider myself racist, but I am to a degree very wrong. If I pick up the latest novel by Robert Ludlum is there any thought given to who is behind the cash register? answer for me is no. Why then a pause regarding a book on the case of this person Mr. Simpson? I did pause when an African-American was behind the counter. Why? I thought that here in the middle of my day why do I want to possibly engage in, if not an uncomfortable moment, an outright argument. I had been routinely exposed to polls splittig the opinions of the guilt or innocence of this man based on color, and it gave me pause. Embarassing for me, and symptomatic of what the trial, and Mr. Spence's well-written book are all about. The versions of this Country's History are often great works of fiction. How would any white individual take a person of color to The Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C. and not be embarassed? Mr. Jefferson used his slaves as currency for debts, and other functions that Mr. Spence will share with readers. "All men are created......several typos follow? Mount Vernon was the home to 300+ slaves, that Mr. Washinton generously "gave" their freedom to.........after he died. What a monumental meaningless act of arrogance, that resounds with others like it, to this day, to our Nation, to the States we live in, and the Towns we call home. He "gave" these people something that was not his to take or give. There is a museum on our National Mall to he Holocaust of World War II. Where is the same type of prominence at least equally worthy of note, and unique in that it happened HERE, ON OUR SOIL, to the African Americans, and Native Americans of this Country? Saddam gasses his people, we stand tall and condemn the man, and he doubtlessly deserves it. If we had the Helicopters and the gas in the 19th Century we would have used them too. Ugly fact, absolutely, one of the many issues we need to deal honestly with? only if we care about the length and quality of our Country's Future. Mr Spence said, "it takes a certain amount of courage to live in a Democracy". Sir Winston Spencer Churchill said, "No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time". You want to be moved, made a bit uncomfortable with all that you may have felt about this case, want to produce ideas that can improve all of our lives? Read Mr. Spence's book it will catalyze you! Democracy is something you have to want and to work for, it's a demanding system to live under. Name anything worthwhile that isn't. What's the alternative? Francis McInerney
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 November 1997
Spence is one of the great lewyers of all time. It makes sense, then, that he should bring some light to all the furor over the OJ Case. He has explained, for the first time, what really happened in the case and why the Prosecution lost what appeared to be an "air tight" case. As he does in many of his books Spence takes the opportunity to moralize about our justice system and about its control by the corporate oligarchy. I wonder if anyone is paying attention? The man is right, and we need to wake up to what he is saying. Justice is not being done in America's courts and there is reason for it and a solution. Spence understands. Many who try cases regularly understand. The public needs to be made to understand before it is to late. Like Pastor Niemoller in Nazi Germany, we can wait too long to speak out. Read this book and then do something. We are in trouble with our justice system and it needs to be fixed.
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on 4 January 1998
Yet another in tasteless series of self-promoting, self-aggrandizing books on the first O.J. case. Mr. Spence, obviously out to make a quick buck, has done what he accuses so many others as having done. Moreover, he has written 85,000 words on what anyone else could do in a few thousand! Despite the cover jacket, there are *NO* new revelations, just his updated and long-winded spin on matters. He finds fault with everyone connected with the case, and assures the readers that if he were in their shoes, he would never commit such errors in judgment. What drew me to the book was that he was an outside observer, but this work lacks journalistic objectivity. It is just another salvo in an ongoing battle of egos, and a disappointing one at that.
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on 22 May 1999
My Dad told me Gerry Spence is a great writer (my dad read "How to Argue..."), so I decided to try this title. It was quite fun to read but sometimes it took me a number of reads to understand his analogies. And I agree that at some points he does appear rather arrogant, as if he's the only one who knows everyone else's mistakes. But some of his "insights" are pretty interesting. So all in all it's a "fun" read but not at all fantastic. Maybe his other books will be better.
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on 31 October 1998
I disagree with the previous reviewers about how great the author thinks he is. He admits his participation in the media-barrage. And he writes with the enthusiasm of conviction. I liked his defense of the jurors and Judge Ito and I didn't think he was too hard on the prosecutors. I guess it comes down to whether you agree with his bottom line: better a guilty man get off than an innocent one be wrongfully convicted.
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on 10 December 1997
Gerry Spence has the abilitity to pontificate on any subject you can name. This time the topic is the Simpson case. Most of the book makes no sense at all, as Spence seems to be arguing all sides at once--but with sincerity and conviction. In the author's view, everyone involved was an idiot--or at least a moron--except Spence. The book isn't really worth reading since the author risked nothing of his own.
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on 14 March 1999
Another OJ book. Nothing new, nothing unique. Spence spends 300+ pages trying to convince the reader of what a fantastic lawyer he is. The more interesting sections revolved around details of Nicole's sexuality. She was obsessed with giving b***jobs, which became known as a "Brentwood hello". Everyone in this book gets one. Everyone!
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on 3 October 2014
A wonderful book by this living legend......not to be missed by OJ followers
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 November 1997
Unfortnately, the last book on the OJ Simpson trial, before this one, wasn't the last word. Spence has become mesmerized by the persona he has created in the media. This book spends half the time telling the world how great the author is. The second half of the book is spent violating every aspect of an attorney-client privilege. Apparently he consulted with Mr. Simpson regarding anticipated litigation, yet concludes that this was not confidential, but a neat tidbit for his book. He thereafter includes the latest in promoting two storylines to attract media attention without foundation or back-up in order to gain headlines. This book is an incredible disappointment.
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