£9.96
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Nowhere To Go [DVD] [1958... has been added to your Basket
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£9.94
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Rikdev Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Nowhere To Go [DVD] [1958]

4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
11 new from £9.94
£9.96 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 GMT on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Check out big titles at small prices with our Chart Offers in DVD & Blu-ray. Find more great prices in our Top Offers Store.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Nowhere To Go [DVD] [1958]
  • +
  • Dance Hall [DVD]
  • +
  • Pool Of London [DVD]
Total price: £29.92
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: George Nader, Maggie Smith, Bernard Lee
  • Directors: Seth Holt
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: studiocanal
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Jan. 2013
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008LU8NPU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,686 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Directed by Seth Holt (The Nanny and Blood From The Mummy’s Tomb), Nowhere To Go is a stylish, grimy tale of deception and betrayal. A rare, late excursion into film noir for Ealing Studios, scripted by first-time director Holt and critic Ken Tynan. This is the digitally remastered, previously unreleased original 100 minute version of the film.

Paul Gregory (George Nader, Robot Monster) is a thief and conman. He has come to London from Canada in order to rob Harriet Jefferson (Bessie Love, The Lost World) of her rare coin collection. Having sold the coins, he puts the money in a safe deposit box and waits to be arrested, expecting to be out in five years. Sentenced instead to ten years, Gregory breaks out of prison with the help of Victor Sloane (Bernard Lee, The Third Man, Dr, No, Goldfinger, From Russia with Love), planning to collect the money then leave the country. A series of accidents and double-crosses sends Gregory spinning through London’s criminal underworld, before he ends up on the run in the Welsh countryside with socialite Bridget Howard (Maggie Smith, TV’s Downton Abbey, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie).

Special Features:

- Revisiting Nowhere To Go (a new featurette including crew interviews)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A. W. Wilson TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Feb. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Ignore the awful cover, and the not very accurate plot description on the back, and you have here a pretty good B/W British "A" film of the late fifties. First things first. An excellent print,picture and sound. There is a proud statement that this is the "extended" version (100') and I would have loved to have the original (87') as a choice to see and compare. Personally I found the extended version just a bit TOO long (several "real time" scenes - Nader enters flat, takes off coat, wanders into kitchen, makes drink, comes back, all without edits - can make for longeurs). But... Nader is much better than I expected, if not quite nasty enough for his trade, and Bernard Lee has one of his best roles, and he can be Nasty! It's fascinating to see Maggie Smith in what was her first major role. Who would have thought she would be bringing tears to my eyes 58 years later in Hoffman's QUARTETTE? The plot is good if a bit meandering, with some good location work. On reading what I have written so far I may seem to be nitpicking-sorry-I don't mean to. This a very rare film indeed and one well worth seeing and making your own mind up about. I enjoyed it, I just can't quite manage 5 stars, but I must say again how great it is to have the opportunity to add some of these 1950's films in mint condition. Go for it and hopefully...enjoy!
Comment 10 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A surprisingly clean and crisp image for an obscure, 55-year-old crime thriller, shortened on original release, now finally available in director Seth Holt's full-length version, more than four decades after his premature death.

Watch out from the start to catch the original British Board of Film Censors classification card, then an exceptionally fierce-looking MGM lion ('George') who looks nothing like the tamer beast ('Leo') seen in the logo today. The film itself opens with the protagonist's explosive prison break, during which barely one word of dialogue is spoken for a whole 10 minutes (an approach perhaps inspired by the 1955 heist classic 'Rififi'). Throughout 'Nowhere to Go', first-time director Holt provides eye-catching long takes and deep-focus compositions.

Unfortunately there's at least one scene when the screenplay relies on egregious coincidence. Marks are also deducted for the paucity of bonus features: just a 13-minute 'making of', no trailer or booklet. It's a shame Maggie Smith couldn't be persuaded to provide an interview for this, her first credited role.
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Some people have over-rated this hard, clever thriller just a bit - it's by no means a classic, but it is engrossing and intriguing, and well worth a look (especially as this DVD restores footage shorn from the film in 1958 and never seen before). It served to launch a few careers. The leading lady, in her first film, is Maggie Smith, 24 years old and tough and sexy, a world away from her eccentric-old-lady roles. Kenneth Tynan, who was the script editor at Ealing Studios just before the company closed down, is co-author of the screenplay with Seth Holt, a brilliant film editor here also making a very striking debut as a director. We need not mourn the fact that Tynan did very little else in the cinema, but the subsequent career of Holt is enough to make you weep. He never seemed to fit in, and yet he was a real, one-of-a-kind talent. Barely had this film been released (to indifferent box-office) than Ealing went bust, and it was three years before he got another film to direct. That was an assignment, the Hammer frightened-lady thriller "Taste Of Fear", and he never claimed it was more than a job of work for him, for all that it's a far slicker movie than its script deserves. Over the next ten years, when the cinema in Britain was supposed to be booming, he got just four movies to direct, and only one of them (the long-lost "Station Six - Sahara" in 1963) could be called a personal film for him. In 1969, he told an interviewer he had been "pretty much on the breadline", and when he finally got another directing job, it was another Hammer, "Blood From The Mummy's Tomb".Read more ›
Comment 7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One of my favourite thrillers of the 50s is finally available on DVD and in a full version ( I hadn't realized the 87minute version was an edited one for its cinema release in 1958) It's a neat little plot with a good cast (why are there hardly any George Nader movies available?) Good jazzy score, reliable performances from Bernard Lee and Bessie Love and best of all the first appearance on film of the wonderful Maggie Smith. It's bleak but worthwhile. A pity Seth Holt only directed a few movies. Check it out.
Comment 7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Although 'badged’ as an Ealing Studios production, this 1958 directorial debut film for Seth Holt (better known as editor of films such as The Lavender Hill Mob) was actually made at MGM-British Studios and indeed Nowhere To Go is quite far removed from typical Ealing fare. Where the film scores particularly highly is in its (particularly early) plotting as con-men, Ralph Nader’s Paul Gregory and Bernard Lee’s Victor Sloane attempt to wangle Bessie Love’s visiting Canadian tourist, Harriett P Jefferson, out of a valuable coin collection, although Gregory, having the perhaps odd plan to serve his time in prison and bag the loot on release, misjudges his likely sentencing, necessitating a jailbreak. Holt’s film also works well on its understated mood, set up nicely by Paul Beeson’s impressive black-and-white cinematography and a vibrant (if rather sparse) jazz score by Dizzy Reece.

The film’s leisurely pace (which particularly takes hold during its second half) is evident from what is an impressive, almost Leone-like, opening jailbreak sequence. Now, effectively 'on the run’, Holt does a good job in depicting the 'net closing in’ on Gregory (and Sloane) as (Hitchcock-like) chance events appear to be conspiring against him, and the trust in his relationship with his 'partner’ is eroded. Acting-wise, Nader does a reasonably good job – perhaps a little too smooth, but with a nice veneer of droll sarcasm – whilst Lee is (as ever) dependable. In her first credited screen role, Maggie Smith is also impressive as the offbeat ('Ciao’) 'rich young thing’, Bridget Howard who Gregory keeps bumping into and who offers the fugitive potential refuge – he having been shunned by his fellow underworld mobsters (featuring an almost unrecognisable Harry H Corbett in an early cameo).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions



Feedback