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Now We Are Six
 
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Now We Are Six

12 Oct 2009 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:19
30
2
6:29
30
3
2:23
30
4
6:44
30
5
3:57
30
6
4:46
30
7
4:05
30
8
4:29
30
9
1:32
30
10
2:45
30
11
4:44


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 2 Nov 2009
  • Release Date: 2 Nov 2009
  • Label: Chrysalis UK
  • Copyright: 2009 Chrysalis Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2009 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002SXC3IY
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 72,993 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Sep 2003
Format: Audio CD
If it weren`t for the inclusion of such nonsense as the "riddles"-song("Now We Are Six") and "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star", not to mention an incongruous cover of the old pop number "To Know Him Is To Love Him", this would arguably be one of the very best of the Seventies Steeleye albums.
This is still nonetheless a must-have album for any serious Steeleye Span aficionado. It was a transitional album, the title of which is a reference to the recruitment of the new, sixth band member, drummer Nigel Pegrum. The album has a rockier feel to it than previous albums, and I think it is better than subsequent albums by this line-up, Commoners Crown, All Around My Hat, and Rocket Cottage, all of which were a bit commercial-sounding, in comparison. I think that on Now We Are Six, the band had got the sound just right, both in terms of musical arrangements and production values.
Aside from the three aforementioned tracks, all of the rest of the album is of a high standard. Thomas the Rhymer, Drink Down the Moon, Two Magicians, Seven Hundred Elves, and Edwin are all very enjoyable to listen to, and the remaining two tracks, Long-A-Growing, and the instrumental Mooncoin Jig, are also very good.
All in all, a very important and unique-sounding Steeleye album from the band`s golden era! You can always just skip the offending tracks.
Incidentally, I reviewed the BGO edition and not the Shanachie edition for a very important reason. The BGO edition is the one with the full-length version of Thomas the Rhymer, which is over twice as long as the Shanachie version.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Oct 2003
Format: Audio CD
What`s wrong with "Seven Hundred Elves"! Sure, it`s not the best track on the album, but it`s certainly not pedestrian! It fits in very nicely with the rest of the (good)material on the album.
For the record, the three duff tracks on Now We Are Six are -1) The execrable "Now We Are Six", which is NOT, as you would expect, the "title track", but features Maddy Prior and other band members impersonating children(thus the "St. Eleye School Choir", a play on the word Steeleye) singing(badly) a childrens` song that contains three "riddles" -- 2) The equally execrable "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" - another childrens` song and again the singers pretend to be children singing. The "Miss Knight" on pianoforte accompaniment is none other than PETER Knight. Whatever possessed them to put this sort of rubbish on an album, especially when they were at the height of their creativity, is an unsolvable mystery. It seems almost nihilistic. -- 3)The infuriatingly incongruous "To Know Him Is To Love Him".
The rest of the album, though, is classic Steeleye Span, which makes it even harder to stomach the three clangers, but it`s still worthy of four stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Sep 2003
Format: Audio CD
Now We Are Six is classic Steeleye Span. Okay, there are the three mind-bogglingly extraneous and gratuitous nonsense tracks, but the rest of the album is must-have material for anyone interested in Steeleye Span. Whilst the two preceding albums were arguably better, overall, this album has some nice touches, such as new drummer Nigel Pegrum`s oboe and flute playing, not to mention his drumming! I prefer Now We Are Six to the albums that followed it. I think that between Now We Are Six and Commoners Crown, there was ONE great album, i.e. the seven `proper` tracks from the former, combined with the first three tracks from the latter. Whilst Now We Are Six certainly contains some out and out drivel, it is more than compensated for by the high quality of the rest of the material. Commoners Crown, on the other hand, starts off on a real high, but after the excitement and drama of the first three tracks, the rest of the album simply fails to deliver and is a complete anticlimax(even though some of the tracks are fairly good).
By the way, get the BGO version of this CD, the one with the full-length version of Thomas the Rhymer. If it`s not available right now, I`m sure it will be again soon.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By RobAnt on 30 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
From the images given above, this is the Shanarchie release, and should be avoided.

"Thomas the Rhymer" is not the original, as appeared on the original Vinyl release, it's a much shorter version. Half of the song is completely missing. The original version of the song is over 6 and a half minutes.

I understand there is another CD release now, which includes the original version of TTR.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By RobAnt on 18 Jun 2009
Format: Audio CD
The 1991 Shanachie CD version of this album DOES NOT include the original recording of "Thomas The Rhymer", as found on the original Vinyl editions. For that you'll need to get the Raven edition of "a rare collection 1972-1996" where it is the second track.

All the other tracks are okay though, and this is a very good Steeleye album. Okay, there are a couple of silly tracks, but if you're a true Steeleye Span Fan, it's a must have.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Miss M. Potter TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Feb 2012
Format: Audio CD
Now we are six was the sixth album from Steeleye Span in the 1970s. It is an interesting album that has some truly great tracks and some of the worst tracks from this fine group.
The album also marked the fact that the line up increased to six members at that time with the inclusion of drummer Nigel Pegrum.
There are stand out tracks such as Thomas the Rhymer which became one of the most successful recordings by the group and a concert favourite.
The album gets off to a good start with Seven Hundred Elves which has a strong folk rock arrangement and then continues with a fine song called Edwin and equally good is track three Drink down the Moon. Then track four is very poor and completely out of keeping with the Steeleye sound on previous albums. This is the track Now we are six. There are ten tracks and the album generally is excellent apart from that track and the last two tracks. Steeleye Span generally always-recorded traditional folk songs but here on track nine we get Twinkle twinkle little star, which sounds out of place on a Steeleye album as well. Both Twinkle Twinkle and Now we are six have the group pretending to sing like children which is embarrassingly poor. The final track is a cover of a pop song/ To know him is to love him. This also sounds out of place being a pop song but in fairness it is a good track. It is a good cover version of the Phil Spector song. And it also includes guest David Bowie on Saxophone.
Apart from the three poor tracks the rest of the album is very good and the group did a fine job of presenting Traditional folk songs.

This version dates from 1992 and the sound and presentation are excellent.
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