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Nothing: From absolute zero to cosmic oblivion - amazing insights into nothingness [Paperback]

New Scientist
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
RRP: £7.99
Price: £5.59 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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There is a newer edition of this item:
Nothing: Surprising Insights Everywhere from Zero to Oblivion Nothing: Surprising Insights Everywhere from Zero to Oblivion 4.4 out of 5 stars (55)
£8.05
In stock.

Book Description

7 Nov 2013

Zero, zip, nada, zilch. It's all too easy to ignore the fascinating possibilities of emptiness and non-existence, and we may well wonder what there is to say about nothing. But scientists have known for centuries that nothing is the key to understanding absolutely everything, from why particles have mass to the expansion of the universe - so without nothing we'd be precisely nowhere.

Absolute zero (the coldest cold that can exist) and the astonishing power of placebos, light bulbs, superconductors, vacuums, dark energy, 'bed rest' and the birth of time - all are different aspects of the concept of nothing. The closer we look, the bigger the subject gets. Why do some animals spend all day doing nothing? What happens in our brains when we try to think about nothing?

With chapters by 20 science writers, including top names such as Ian Stewart, Marcus Chown, Nigel Henbest, Michael Brooks, Paul Davies and David Fisher, this fascinating and intriguing book revels in a subject that has tantalised the finest minds for centuries, and shows there's more to nothing than meets the eye.


Frequently Bought Together

Nothing: From absolute zero to cosmic oblivion - amazing insights into nothingness + Paradox: The Nine Greatest Enigmas in Physics + 13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Intriguing Scientific Mysteries of Our Time
Price For All Three: £18.17

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books (7 Nov 2013)
  • Language: Unknown
  • ISBN-10: 1846685184
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846685187
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 12.8 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

New Scientist, the world's leading science & technology weekly magazine, was launched in 1956 "for all those men and women who are interested in scientific discovery, and in its industrial, commercial and social consequences".

The brand's mission is no different today - New Scientist reports, explores and interprets the results of human endeavour and issues that affect us all, explaining why a development is significant as well as putting social and cultural context around it.

Product Description

Book Description

The next popular science bestseller from the Does Anything Eat Wasps? crew

About the Author

New Scientist is the bestselling and fastest-growing science magazine in the world. Jeremy Webb is its editor-in-chief. New Scientist's series of 9 previous titles with Profile, beginning with Does Anything Eat Wasps?, has now sold over 2 million copies.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting 8 Jan 2014
By S. Zam
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
nice collection of articles from the magazine, makes interesting reading and can be read in short bursts as its not one long tome...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite good 6 Mar 2014
By Andy
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The articles on physics and cosmology were excellent and I would have liked more of the same. I was disappointed that about half of the book was given over to the index and credits.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The varied subjects of these essays do to some extent stretch the concept of 'nothing' a little; but every one is interesting. I went through the whole book at a single (very much protracted) sitting. No wonder it reached the best seller lists.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nothing is very little indeed 23 May 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I was quite disappointed by this issue from the New Scientist. I expect cutting edge from the magazine but instead got old news - most of which is available on w3, allbeit in slightly different form. Certainly , I learned some new things - and this made reading the book worth the time, however, as a whole, although each article was well enough presented, I would categorize it as a mediocre effort and put the blame on the editors not the individual authors.
Sorry guys!

George F. Hart, Professor emeritus, LSU.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Im a science nerd 7 Dec 2013
By Mel
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Great to pick up and put down, interesting if not querky. Essential reading for those who love science and understand it or for those who want something different to read whilst learning something
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
A set of well-explained essays on science topics loosely (and in some cases closely) connected to the concept of nothing, ranging from biology and medicine to maths and cosmology. You do not need to be an expert to understand them.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book 21 Dec 2013
By Tony
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Very fascinating read, you can learn a lot from this little book.
You need to know much more about nothing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars More than Just Nothing! 13 July 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
As expected from New Scientist, it is intriguing, thought provoking and yet remains an interesting read for anyone interested in the off beat or quirky side of science
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Clear, well-organised, and fascinating. A well-made book from a publishing viewpoint, too.
Published 19 days ago by John Anderson
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
loved this book - so interesting and is written in a way to be interested to the layman.
Published 1 month ago by Barbs
1.0 out of 5 stars Very poor effort.
Nothing to write home about, heard it all before.
Published 1 month ago by penaltymate
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
gtreat book
Published 1 month ago by jb
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
fast service good price
Published 1 month ago by AGH
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very swift delivery and well packaged.
Published 1 month ago by Jacqueline Pollard
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book
Published 2 months ago by Photojake
3.0 out of 5 stars There are 86 organs in a human body that do nothing - can you believe...
The moment I saw a book about nothing I had to get it! What a fascinating subject, what a great way to acquaint the reader with a concept of nothing - a series of New Scientist... Read more
Published 3 months ago by Lola
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing
A very good ebook covering a range of topics that are not usually covered. Found the topics to be thought provoking and interesting.
Published 3 months ago by murph011
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing to tell really
It is a good book, with articles on diverse subjects all related to nothing.
It certainly did deepen my insights about the big bang theory. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Daniel Marivoet
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