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Nothing to Lose: 12 (Jack Reacher) Paperback – 26 Mar 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (Transworld Publishers a division of the Random House Group) (26 Mar 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553818112
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553818116
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 3.7 x 17.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (392 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,429,819 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lee Child is one of the world's leading thriller writers.His novels consistently achieve the number one slot in hardback and paperback on bestsellers lists on both sides of the Atlantic, and are translated into over forty languages.His debut novel, Killing Floor, was written after he was made redundant from his television job in Manchester, and introduced his much-admired maverick hero, the former military cop Jack Reacher.Born in Coventry, he now lives in America.


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Product Description

Review

"Lee Child's Nothing to Lose is exactly why I listen to audiobooks." (Kati Nicholl Daily Express) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Book Description

The new Jack Reacher thriller by the no.1 bestseller. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

124 of 131 people found the following review helpful By Julia Flyte TOP 100 REVIEWER on 2 April 2008
Format: Hardcover
After having Reacher team up with his former army colleagues in "Bad Luck and Trouble", Lee Child has gone back to Reacher's loner roots. "Nothing to Lose" opens with Reacher literally walking into the small town of Despair, Colorado, where he's promptly arrested and run out of town. What are the secrets that the residents of Despair are so desperate to keep hidden? Reacher is equally determined to find out...

The pace of this book is slower than most of the others that Lee Child has written and my feeling is that perhaps it related to a departure from formula. Usually Reacher encounters someone - a former colleague, an attractive woman, a man with a missing wife - with a problem and that creates the momentum. In this book, he simply stumbles on behaviour that he finds odd, and therefore starts investigating. Along the way he teams up with a local policewoman who also provides the obligatory romantic sub-plot. The book keeps you guessing with lots of sub-plots and little mysteries along the way (some of which turn out to be red herrings, but I suppose that adds to the intrigue).

"Nothing to Lose" delivered my much-anticipated "Reacher fix", but it's not Lee Child's best. Although it's a stand-alone novel, I wouldn't recommend starting here if you haven't read any other Lee Child books: you won't get what the fuss is about. I wasn't as absorbed by this one as I have been by the others in the series. The middle section dragged a little, but having said that it's still an easy read that goes down fast and keeps you up turning pages into the night. Probably if it had been another author this would have rated 3 stars for me, but I'm a shameless Reacher fan, so I'm rating it 4 stars.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. John P. Leahy on 25 Sep 2008
Format: Hardcover
This was my first Lee Child book (Just bought the first one). I got into it straight away and was quite shocked to see some of his loyal fans give low scores. Highly recommend this book as the story stayed with me for a long while before I went out and bought the first book. I can only assume some fans have OD on the series, I guess they will be replaced by new fans like me. Look forward to the series....
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By 100wordreviewer on 7 July 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of Lee Child and his rogue, justice-dealing loner, Reacher. In "Nothing to Lose", Reacher must solve the mystery of a remote town, Despair, whose people seem unaccountably keen to see the back of him. This makes the plot reminiscent of the first Jack Reacher, "Killing Floor". Indeed, the whole plot is uncomfortably formulaic and reminiscent of earlier Lee Child thrillers, from Reacher shacking up with an interesting loner female to his final assault on a stronghold defended by some tough guys. I hoped desperately for some twists or intriguing characters, but in vain. Indeed, the plot conceit of having two neighbouring towns entitled "Hope" (decent place) and "Despair" (dump) was symptomatic of what feels like the author's need to let a second pair of eyes edit this down to something tighter and better (see eg "Tripwire" or "Echo Burning"). I'd have liked to another outing for Reacher's best female sidekick, the enigmatic Neagly, too (see "Without Fail" and "Bad Luck and Trouble"). And Reacher's terrific, ironic sense of humour, as seen in "The Enemy" seems to have deserted him.

So why 4 stars? Well, it's still a decent read, and moves along briskly enough. But c'mon Lee Child, you can do better than this!

For: an OK read. Against: slow-moving and formulaic in places.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sophia on 13 Sep 2010
Format: Paperback
Just to make it clear, I've read all of the Reacher books and enjoyed them. Unfortunately this reads like someone else in my position had written it.

This was Reacher by rote. He starts out on his way somewhere, everything is not as it seems, he continues on his way and solves a problem that improves people's lives, getting a girl on the way that understands that he isn't the kind of man to be tied down.

It reads like a book deep in a series, which of course it is, but the other Reacher books have always been so enjoyable that this book suffers much in comparison. I liked the concepts and the storyline and there were some good parts but that doesn't add up to a good read.

If, like me, you like to read all the way through a series then you'll read it anyway. If not, skip it, the next one is better.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mark Mcclelland on 12 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
I've read all of the 3rd person Reacher books and this is definitely the weakest. I agree with other reviewers that for three quarters of the book the plot chases its tail, and I too found myself skipping some of the longer passages of Reacher yomping around the edge of the compound just to try and inject some pace.

The plot was contrived and the "political message" soap boxing at the end was ham fisted and actually seemed out of character for Reacher. And talking of character, Reacher as a character hasn't grown or changed through the books. They now remind me of 70's TV show where the status quo resets at the end of each episode and the characters never evolve. He is quite frankly one dimensional and actually characterless. Even his sexual encounters appear more functional than passionate and the whole "wear clothes until they smell then buy a new set" routine is getting a bit stale.

From the Reacher facts at the start of each book, he will be 50 this year. How much longer can he drift aimlessly ? How many more fights against the odds can he win ? Where is he going ? Perhaps it is clearer from the 1st person novels, but what is Reachers motivation ?

I hope Lee Child starts trying to address at least some of these questions and advance the character.
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