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Notebooks for "A Raw Youth" Hardcover – Dec 1969


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 570 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1st Edition edition (Dec. 1969)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226159655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226159652
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,285,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky was born in Moscow in 1821, the second of a physician's seven children. His mother died in 1837 and his father was murdered a little over two years later. When he left his private boarding school in Moscow he studied from 1838 to 1843 at the Military Engineering College in St Petersburg, graduating with officer's rank. His first story to be published, 'Poor Folk' (1846), was a great success.

In 1849 he was arrested and sentenced to death for participating in the 'Petrashevsky circle'; he was reprieved at the last moment but sentenced to penal servitude, and until 1854 he lived in a convict prison at Omsk, Siberia. In the decade following his return from exile he wrote The Village of Stepanchikovo (1859) and The House of the Dead (1860). Whereas the latter draws heavily on his experiences in prison, the former inhabits a completely different world, shot through with comedy and satire.

In 1861 he began the review Vremya (Time) with his brother; in 1862 and 1863 he went abroad, where he strengthened his anti-European outlook, met Mlle Suslova, who was the model for many of his heroines, and gave way to his passion for gambling. In the following years he fell deeply in debt, but in 1867 he married Anna Grigoryevna Snitkina (his second wife), who helped to rescue him from his financial morass. They lived abroad for four years, then in 1873 he was invited to edit Grazhdanin (The Citizen), to which he contributed his Diary of a Writer. From 1876 the latter was issued separately and had a large circulation. In 1880 he delivered his famous address at the unveiling of Pushkin's memorial in Moscow; he died six months later in 1881. Most of his important works were written after 1864: Notes from Underground (1864), Crime and Punishment (1865-6), The Gambler (1866), The Idiot (1869), The Devils (1871) and The Brothers Karamazov (1880).


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trismegistus on 28 Feb. 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Be very clear that the 'Notebooks' are not the novel known as "A Raw Youth" which is often published in English as "The Adolescent". The Notebooks are interesting from an academic point of view, but obviously lack the literary quality of the novel.
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By Magdolna Gabor on 21 Nov. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The quality is excellent, the transport was fast and accurate, i would recommend it to everyone. Just a good experience :-)
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