Not Quite World's End: A Traveller's Tales and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £4.85 (24%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Not Quite World's End: A ... has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Not Quite World's End: A Traveller's Tales Hardcover – Unabridged, 5 Oct 2007


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£15.15
£3.15 £0.01
£15.15 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan; First Edition edition (5 Oct 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405050004
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405050005
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 4.4 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 561,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Like the best BBC coverage, it combines meticulous reporting with attitude...'
-- Guardian

'an engaging collection of "snap-shots"...the reporting, whether from Tokyo or Baghdad, is vintage Simpson.' -- The Spectator

`Enthusiasm and energy...combined with his easy prose...'
-- TLS

Review

`a richly satisfying read' --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
John's somewhat pompous and self-regarding writing style sometimes grates, but the breadth of his experience across the world's trouble-spots over the last 30 years is truly astonishing. This book contains some evocative insights and anecdotes, and I found it both engrossing and informative. Could have done without the liberal sermonising on occasions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Roger D. Hyam on 2 Jan 2009
Format: Paperback
When I was impressionable and even more naive than now I was warned not to trust anyone who started a story with "When I was in ...". This was tremendously good advice. For some reason the society I swim in rates travel above all else and fails to see it as just another form of consumption - like fast cars, designer clothes and unnecessary kitchens. It is relatively easy to travel half way round the world, look poverty and injustice in the eye, then rail about it at comfortable middle class dinner parties. It is far harder to admit to it in your own back yard.

Not Quite World's End by John Simpson didn't therefore look promising as the only book I got under the Christmas tree this year. It consists almost entirely of "When I was in..." stories. Fortunately Simpson has been in a few interesting places in the last forty years such as Saddam Hussein's trial or parts of the Congo and so many of the stories are genuinely fascinating and I have had an entertaining few days working through the four hundred plus pages. There is no doubt that Simpson is a highly professional reporter. The back stories to some of the major conflicts of the world are fascinating.

Unfortunately Simpson can't help giving us more than a glimpse of his personal life. He could have covered the birth of his son (a third child by a second marriage late in Simpson's life) in a page or two and it would have had the same effect as the entire chapter he devotes to it. Has he not noticed that although conception and birth stories are of immense personal importance their interest to others is minimal? Parts of the book read like a rather embarrassing chain letter.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Timothy A. Hannigan on 8 July 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a book that echoes with the sound of barrels being scraped - or is it the sound of a multi-book contract with Macmillan being lazily completed?

John Simpson's previous volumes of autobiography, egotistic reportage and anecdote have been stonking good reads - the pomposity and digressions very much part of the attraction.
But in this latest instalment he fails on any number of counts. For one, the previous careful balance of self-importance and self-deprecation comes badly undone here. Grand swagger is very much part of Simpson's persona, but in this book it frequently reaches unbearable levels. At one point he writes: "I didn't particularly care about myself... but I don't like to see any sign that the BBC is being treated disrespectfully". Simpson knows as well as anyone that when it comes to major foreign news stories he IS the BBC, and that of course, is the point.

There is some cringe-worthy name dropping and a lot of smug crowing about the wonderfully exotic and indulgently adventurous life he has led.
This was all present in his earlier works, and was all bearable - or even part of the charm. What makes it less so here is the shambolic scrapbook tone of this book. Simpson claims in his introduction that the book is a loose portrait of the current state of things, the world in which we live. This is nonsense. The declared theme is quite obviously a sloppy last minute tag-on, afterthought of some editor (who ought, incidentally, to have spent more time on the proof-reading) eager to provide at least some kind of theme for a random collection of unconnected anecdotes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on 23 Mar 2008
Format: Hardcover
This was the first book chosen by our recently formed readers group. A bad choice in that not many of us finished it, but good in the way that it incited lots of discussion. Personally, I find autobiographies difficult anyway, and generally read fiction, but I have always thought that John Simpson must be an intersting man with compelling tales to tell of his journeys over the years. I was therefore quite pleased to be 'forced' to read his book for the book club.

I found it really hard to read. The style was poor and it seemed to dot about all over the place. He would start a tale and then get side tracked and I felt the end was never really reached. I was disappointed from the start as Chapters 1 and 2 failed to tell me anything that I could not have read in the papers at the time of Saddam's trial etc. I got the impression that the book was compiled from 'stories' Simpson had written at different times and then, at a later date, categorised them under chapter headings without re reading. Some accounts were repeated in more than one chapter, although not written any better or grabbing any more of my attention the second time around!

By chapter 4, I was sick fed up of hearing about his son, Rafe, only to turn the page and find that chapter 5 was entitled 'Rafe' - oh no, no more please! This, I was heartened to learn, was a view shared by all members of my readers group and not just me as a childless 40 something!

On the whole I felt the book was a wasted opportunity. It is rare for me not to finish a book, but having skipped pages in the early chapters, I finally skipped chapters 10 onwards altogether!
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback