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Not Now, Bernard Paperback – 4 Oct 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Andersen (4 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849394679
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849394673
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 0.4 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,935 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David McKee's first book was published in 1964. His books are now published in many languages throughout the world, and many of them have been adapted for television. He is one of the leading contemporary children's book creators.

David McKee was born and brought up in South Devon, where he went from grammar school to Plymouth Art College. Whilst still at college he started selling one-off cartoons to newspapers and on graduation, he began to contribute to such publications as Punch, Times Education Supplement and the Reader's Digest. His first book, Two Can Toucan was published in 1964 and since then he has written and illustrated numerous children's books. As well as his own books, which include the popular best-selling Elmer series, David illustrates for a number of other writers including Michael Bond's Paddington Bear and Forrest Wilson's SuperGran books.

Product Description

Review

"Even very young children see the joke." T.E.S. "Shows David McKee's droll, deadpan humour at its very best." Books for Keeps "I adore this book, it's one of my favourite picture books, now out in mini version... With one sentence per page this hilarious book with wonderfully expressive illustrations is great for beginner readers, but I would recommend it to all ages and abilities. I've lost count the number of times I have read it, but it still makes me laugh out loud. The last but one picture in particular is a classic!" -- Debbie Williams Primary Times "A brilliant image of parent-child relationships ... that brings matching ear-to-ear grins to every grown-up and child-in-the-lap'" Books for Keeps "A brilliant fable" -- Tony Bradman The Ultimate First Book Guide

Book Description

The perennial and well-loved classic picture book story about parents too preoccupied to notice their own child.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By musicdoesnthavetobeboring on 4 Oct. 2007
Format: Paperback
My 20 month old daughter loves this book. It's a simple enough story for her to understand yet with a melancholic edge which has her happily gurning her pretend sad face (especially when the monster breaks one of Bernard's toys)! Recommended to all!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Burton on 19 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback
My almost 3 year old son loves this book as it has a monster, my 5 year old daughter loves this book because she can read it herself and although it makes me cry I love this book because it makes me think about how often I am saying 'not now...' all parents say it and while teaching children that it is not always appropriate to interrupt is important so it taking the time to listen to what our children are telling us and spending a little time in their world. Children view it as a funny book with monsters that a new reader can access not a scary story of indifferent, neglectful parents and it is this fact that makes in such a good book and the illustrations are great to!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By venerable_bede on 13 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
My year-old son adores Not Now Bernard. It's his number one favourite thing ever... all his toys, all his books - nothing else compares. Everywhere we go, Bernard goes. If we so much as say the magic word "Bernard", he lights up and looks round for it. If we put Bernard on a shelf, he'll lie on the floor gazing at the shelf with big, tear-filled eyes till we get it down for him. When the monster goes to bed at the end, he leans in and gives it a kissy (and we didn't teach him to do that, it's all him!). I don't quite know why he's so passionately attached to this book in particular, but I do know we've got three copies in case anything happens to it and it's cast-iron guaranteed to make him happy. Thanks, David McKee! (We love Elmer as well, but he's just not Bernard, is he...)
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By gossels@hotmail.com on 29 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
Reading this book made me ask myself do my children get enough attention? The children related to this book.
Bernard is left to his own devices. He seeks attention from the family and then gets eaten by a monster..the parents don't realize they are talking to a monster and not to their son Bernard (even the monster gets confused)...
It has the great affect of making a monster seem friendly. Explaining the dilemma parents have of trying to spend time with their children and at the same time getting on with their household chores. Easy enough for your 4-5 year old to read along with you.
I intend to buy extra copies to send to other family members.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 5 Aug. 2006
Format: Hardcover
This was my favourite book when I was a boy, read it a million times. The cool thing is, when you read it as an adult you realise that there is an important mesage there too.
Ignore your children and they will turn into monsters.
Brilliant!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Textile Figure Artist on 26 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
The mum and dad in this story are so preoccupied with day to day life, they fail to spot that their lonely son, Bernard, has a monster in his bedroom. Eventually Bernard is eaten by the monster, who then masquerades as Bernard!

All parents have busy days on which they have not enough time for their children. I like the fact that the lonely Bernard, has a fertile imagination and is resourceful enough to invent a monster. He then pretends to have been eaten by it/ becomes the monster, himself. A classic! Far from sinister, this story shows how an intelligent child occupies himself when his parents are busy.

It's a great way to encourage children to pretend role play/ make believe, discuss imagination, emotions, seeking attention and family life. It is unlikely that the author intended this to be the tale of a severely neglected child.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Doyenne of Books on 22 Oct. 2007
Format: Paperback
I adore this book and it has been cherished and read again and again for my 2 daughters. They found the idea of Bernard's parents not noticing he'd turned into a monster very funny and not at all sad or scary. I personally don't think there is any sinister message here - all kids know of the feeling of being ignored by their parents at some point in their lives!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Textile Figure Artist on 13 April 2012
Format: Paperback
The mum and dad in this story are so preoccupied with day to day life, they fail to spot that their lonely son, Bernard, has a monster in his bedroom. Eventually Bernard is eaten by the monster, who then masquerades as Bernard!

All parents have busy days on which they have not enough time for their children. I like the fact that the lonely Bernard, has a fertile imagination and is resourceful enough to invent a monster. He then pretends to have been eaten by it/ becomes the monster, himself. A classic!

It's a great way to encourage children to pretend role play/ make believe, discuss imagination, emotions, seeking attention and family life.
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