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Product details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Lulu.com; First edition (14 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847997074
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847997074
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,065,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I'm a neurotic, recently radioactive, strange person who spends most of his time being distracted by movies, books, games and teaching English to Japanese people. I'm pretty sure I've found a place in the world, even if it is thousands of miles away from where I was born, amidst a race of people who secretly fear, love and despise me, though that could be just my imagination.

I grew up in England, lived a life full of sighs and then escaped to Japan which is a much more interesting country and actually has jobs. So now I enjoy working with the cutest demographic in the world during the day and writing for the twisted souls at night.

I am possibly cursed. Electronic equipment seems to have half its normal lifespan when in my care and before publishing my first book I was a victim of England's floods of 2007 then I got caught in the great Japanese earthquake of 2011 just before publishing my second book. It could just be my subconscious's attempts to make my life more interesting. I've never been much of a fan of the real world anyway. The world of stories is far more interesting. I love having control of my own world and following amusing and bizarre characters as they make their mark on the realm I have created.

So why not join me? If you visit my website you can try free samples and read my blog that exists purely for me to vent the noxious fumes in my head.

Product Description

Review

I really enjoyed the writing style; the wording and imagery are excellent. This writer has good wit and refreshing honesty about himself, and the publishing world as well. -- Darren G. Burton, Lulu Writer, April 20th, 2008

What impressed me most about this collection was the variety of styles that the author utilises. The tales range from straightforward fantasy and science fiction genres to a multitude of personal impressions, sometimes from the monster's point of view. Mr Rowe also manages to get into the female psyche without patronizing the women he's writing about. I think this collection would appeal to a wide range of readers, not just science fiction and fantasy fans. If you enjoy a twist in the tale kind of plot, this is the short story collection to buy and read. Mr Rowe's pacing for each story is good with splendid swash-buckling fight scenes and breathless chase sequences. Though if you are a prude like me, be prepared to be shocked at the explicit sexual descriptions in Au Naturale. But that's no reason not to read it because it is one of the best twist-in-the-tale stories in the collection and has a really funny ending!

There's no shallow plots or gratuitous violence here. Each story holds its own, though sometimes I wish the story would go on - 'Redbird and Eleanor', for instance. I particularly enjoyed his exploration of werewolves in 'Harry'. That's saying a lot because personally I dislike werewolves nearly as much as I dislike vampires. Mr Rowe's writing draws you in and hooks you. You have to read on to find out what happens.

It is difficult to say which were the best stories. They're all so good. My personal favourites however include the following:

Guardian: an excellent take on the eternal guardian of a forgotten treasure tale. The story is from the point of view of the guardian and is just beautiful.

Redbird and Eleanor: OK, it's my sort of genre - fantasy. But this tale isn't just swords and sorcery. The plot is excellent with magical encounters and a lovely fight with bandits. The characters are real and have an excellent sense of humour. I think that Mr Rowe could expand this and maybe write a whole novel about Redbird.

Selling Liberty: the first short story in a collection always makes an impression. Again it's fantasy and extremely funny with a very personable female narrator.

Different people will like different stories in the collection. That's what's so good about Mr Rowe's prolific writing - there's something which will appeal to everyone. Don't be timid, buy it now and enjoy the collection for yourself -- Anna Brock, Ghost Writer and Critic, April 27th, 2008

Don't let the humorous summary fool you. This collection of short stories can be serious, and is definitely dark in places such as the edge-of-your-seat short, "Selling Liberty."

If short reads are your thing, then you definitely should buy a copy of NOT ALL OF THEM ABOUT ZOMBIES. -- Randy Hudsucker, Lulu Writer, 10th June 2008

I really enjoyed the writing style; the wording and imagery are excellent. This writer has good wit and refreshing honesty about himself, and the publishing world as well.
-- Darren G. Burton, Lulu Writer, April 20th, 2008

The stories had a recognizable theme or plot: Yes

The settings are described enough to provide mental pictures: Yes

The settings are essential to the storylines: Yes

It is clear who the protagonist(s)/antagonist(s) are: Yes

The dialogue is easy to read and flows well: Yes

The grammar and punctuation are accurate: Found only a couple of typos. Nothing to deter from the rating this book will receive.

Do the stories have a conflict that needs to be resolved? No
If yes, please explain.

There is a notable climax to the stories: Yes

The points of views were consistent and easy to follow: Yes

Please write the review:

`Not All of Them about Zombies' is an appropriate title for Matthew Rowe's collection of short stories. Some of them are bizarre and ludicrous but then the endings will surprise you each and every time. For the reader of the bizarre this is an exciting book. Au Naturale is exactly the type of story that you'd expect from its title so don't be shocked. Each and every story will keep you interested and reading to find out the surprise endings. A great read.

4**** -- Mind Fog Reviews' Anastasia Cassella-Young, 2nd July 2008

What impressed me most about this collection was the variety of styles that the author utilises. The tales range from straightforward fantasy and science fiction genres to a multitude of personal impressions, sometimes from the monster's point of view. Mr Rowe also manages to get into the female psyche without patronizing the women he's writing about. I think this collection would appeal to a wide range of readers, not just science fiction and fantasy fans. If you enjoy a twist in the tale kind of plot, this is the short story collection to buy and read. Mr Rowe's pacing for each story is good with splendid swash-buckling fight scenes and breathless chase sequences. Though if you are a prude like me, be prepared to be shocked at the explicit sexual descriptions in Au Naturale. But that's no reason not to read it because it is one of the best twist-in-the-tale stories in the collection and has a really funny ending!

There's no shallow plots or gratuitous violence here. Each story holds its own, though sometimes I wish the story would go on - 'Redbird and Eleanor', for instance. I particularly enjoyed his exploration of werewolves in 'Harry'. That's saying a lot because personally I dislike werewolves nearly as much as I dislike vampires. Mr Rowe's writing draws you in and hooks you. You have to read on to find out what happens.

It is difficult to say which were the best stories. They're all so good. My personal favourites however include the following:

Guardian: an excellent take on the eternal guardian of a forgotten treasure tale. The story is from the point of view of the guardian and is just beautiful.

Redbird and Eleanor: OK, it's my sort of genre - fantasy. But this tale isn't just swords and sorcery. The plot is excellent with magical encounters and a lovely fight with bandits. The characters are real and have an excellent sense of humour. I think that Mr Rowe could expand this and maybe write a whole novel about Redbird.

Selling Liberty: the first short story in a collection always makes an impression. Again it's fantasy and extremely funny with a very personable female narrator.

Different people will like different stories in the collection. That's what's so good about Mr Rowe's prolific writing - there's something which will appeal to everyone. Don't be timid, buy it now and enjoy the collection for yourself -- Anna Brock, Ghost Writer and Critic, April 27th, 2008

From the Publisher

Made possible by Lulu.com this is a unique collection of short stories varying from horror to fantasy, comedy and science-fiction. It includes the short 'Don't Fear The Reaper', which won the monthly horror competition hosted by Dark Fiction, and previews some upcoming projects that explore these worlds and characters in more detail. Each story also comes with an entertaining introduction describing the original idea behind the story and the evolution of the work to give writers and fans an insight into the writer's methods.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Richards VINE VOICE on 17 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
This is an ideal collection of short stories for short attention spans, people who read on the go, people who think they're too busy to read, and big girls (and boys) who just wanna have fun.

The witty storylines and sometimes absolutely brilliant concepts are well-written, to the point, and never, ever boring. The author, via the introductory pages, includes his thoughts and the inspiration for each story, so by the time you start the first story you're already at page 27.

1. Selling Liberty: One girl, One sword, Two thugs, One twist
2. The Happily Ever After: Red Riding Hood survives her traumatic childhood incident and changes her name to Redcape. She flirts with a stranger, dances around a wolf, and lives happily for a while.
3. Au Naturale: A young man's experiences a real live natural woman. (Explicit)
4. Just a Fluke: A man wakes up and finds out that he's not quite himself. The longest story is one of the best in this collection.
5. Zombies: The shortest is the one that's actually all about zombies
6. Breakdown: A rescue mission that goes awfully wrong
7. Guardian: Old man with a mission
8. Harry: When imaginary beasties cross the line
9. Don't Fear the Reaper: A day in the life of Death
10. Good Intentions: Two-bit hood fails ignition test
11. Redbird and Eleanor: Back to the "Hood"

"Keepin' It Short" Summary (KISS): Small collection - eleven short stories and a long introduction- and as promised, not all about zombies.

To quote from the final page:

"Parting is such sweet sorrow - unless it involved a chainsaw, in which case you're probably just glad it's over"

Amanda Richards
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
A collection of short stories from a writer who states in the foreword he hopes this collection will open a few doors for him and get some attention from publishers. And on the basis of this collection we can but hope his plan works because there's some very promising material in here. It's a pretty diverse mix of fantasy horror and science fiction and crime, and the author's voice is quite individual. He manages to find a different style for each story that is all his own.

The book runs for just under two hundred pages. It begins with a preface, mentioning the above, and then an introduction that gives a look at all the stories and what they're about and how he came up with the ideas. This is very interesting stuff, although you may prefer to read it after the stories so that you can come to them afresh. The preface does give you ample warning and opportunity to do this if you should so desire.

After that come ten stories, one short poem, and a brief afterword.

The stories are as follows:

`Selling Liberty'. Running for twenty pages, a fantasy story telling about a young girl heading off to sell a prized possession who runs into trouble. Can she depend on the kindness of strangers?
Not a story I can say too much about without giving things away but it manages some good twists and developments and you may not see the end coming. Worthy of Roald Dahl.

`The happily ever after' is twelve pages long and is a sequel to the story of little red riding hood, telling what the main character did next. Written in the style of an old fashioned fairy tale, this succeeds rather well. The preface promises the possibility of more like this. I wouldn't mind to read them.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ian Tapley VINE VOICE on 11 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of eleven short stories from across the fantasy, science fiction and horror genres, each written with unusual insight and wit.

One thing that I greatly enjoyed with this book is the fact that the Introduction features a short breakdown of the themes and inspirations for each of the stories, giving a delightful little window into the author's mind.

Although all the stories make for interesting and/or amusing reading, a couple deserve a special mention. The first being 'The Happily Ever After', in which we see the later adventures of Little Red Riding Hood. What I enjoyed most about this story was the fact that Rowe manages to perfectly capture the tone of the old cautionary fairy tales.

The other stand-out story is called 'Harry', in which a nervous man focuses all of his anxiety into the form of a werewolf which hunts him for three nights every month, but which leaves him free of fear the rest of the time.

Although there are a few disappointing elements to the book (such as the one that actually is about zombies), the biggest disappointment here is the fact that some of the stories could easily work as novels but here they end just when you're desperate to read more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 July 2008
Format: Paperback
NOT ALL OF THEM ABOUT ZOMBIES is a collection of ten short stories and a poem by a young, British writer. While it is difficult to categorize the stories into any one genre, they most definitely reflect the mind of someone who seems to be always asking, "what if...?"

There is a very amusing preface that seems to highlight the personality of the writer as he introduces his book. The introduction offers an explanation of each story and the origins of it. While it is always interesting to know where inspiration strikes and how a story comes to be, I recommend saving the introduction for later so that your mind is completely open as you are reading.

Among the stories included in this collection are some that seek to answer very unique questions. In "Selling Liberty" readers are placed in the middle of an evolving storyline. A girl is desperately trying to evade two men who are after her prize possession. Can you determine the true story from the point of view you are presented with?

Another question, posed in "The Happily Ever After," is what ever happened to Little Red Riding Hood? How did her experience with the Big Bad Wolf affect the rest of her life?

Mixed among the stories is a fair share of horror (werewolves and true fears realized) and sci-fi (imagine waking up as one entity in a shared body).

While author Matthew Rowe has presented some very imaginative ideas in this book, I must also mention that there is some very graphic, adult content in one of the stories.

NOT ALL OF THEM ABOUT ZOMBIES is available for purchase online.

Reviewed by: JodiG.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Back to the "Hood" 17 Jun. 2008
By Amanda Richards - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an ideal collection of short stories for short attention spans, people who read on the go, people who think they're too busy to read, and big girls (and boys) who just wanna have fun.

The witty storylines and sometimes absolutely brilliant concepts are well-written, to the point, and never, ever boring. The author, via the introductory pages, includes his thoughts and the inspiration for each story, so by the time you start the first story you're already at page 27.

1. Selling Liberty: One girl, One sword, Two thugs, One twist
2. The Happily Ever After: Red Riding Hood survives her traumatic childhood incident and changes her name to Redcape. She flirts with a stranger, dances around a wolf, and lives happily for a while.
3. Au Naturale: A young man's experiences a real live natural woman. (Explicit)
4. Just a Fluke: A man wakes up and finds out that he's not quite himself. The longest story is one of the best in this collection.
5. Zombies: The shortest is the one that's actually all about zombies
6. Breakdown: A rescue mission that goes awfully wrong
7. Guardian: Old man with a mission
8. Harry: When imaginary beasties cross the line
9. Don't Fear the Reaper: A day in the life of Death
10. Good Intentions: Two-bit hood fails ignition test
11. Redbird and Eleanor: Back to the "Hood"

"Keepin' It Short" Summary (KISS): Small collection - eleven short stories and a long introduction- and as promised, not all about zombies.

To quote from the final page:

"Parting is such sweet sorrow - unless it involved a chainsaw, in which case you're probably just glad it's over"

Amanda Richards, June 16, 2008
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Clever And Witty Book 24 Oct. 2008
By K. Nordhus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was hooked from the first minute that I picked up this book, it's just that good.The book is filled with a fun, witty, and very clever collection of eleven short stories ranging from fractured fairy tales to horror, with a little comedy and fantasy.

The stories which are extremely interesting do an excellent job of showcasing the authors talent and remind me a little of some of Edgar Allen Poe's work and at the same time some of the old episodes of The Twilight Zone that I enjoyed as a child...

So if you enjoy fun clever and witty stories with just a little bit of a twist, then you're going to love Not All Of Them About Zombies by Matthew Rowe...
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Zombies? What zombies? A Superb Collection of Supernatural and Fantasy! 15 Oct. 2008
By Shannon L. Yarbrough - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Rather than introduce this book's author to you, I'll let him do it himself. Here is the very introduction from the first page of his book:

"Matthew Rowe is a recently short-haired, neurotic lay about who is currently unsure of his place in the world. He hopes this book will go some way to asserting himself somewhere. He has written a lot and he wants to share it all, but no one with the money or power has let him as yet. He's only in his late twenties though so he remains foolishly optimistic. Some people think it is endearing."

As a POD author, I can certainly relate to Matthew's feelings about wanting to be discovered. Unfortunately, most of us know that isn't always going to happen when you self-publish a book. SELF isn't part of the word for nothing because that's exactly who is going to have to do all the hard work if you want to succeed at it. Yourself. But Matthew's book, Not All of Them About Zombies, has a four star rating over at Amazon.com and Amazon UK with four various reviews on each site. As I write this, his Lulu rank is 8,849. It may not be much in the way of being discovered, but it's definitely a nice bit of success. And it is much deserved. Mr. Rowe's non-Zombie book is quite the eccentric collection of short stories which are both entertaining and well written.

The book is a collection of 10 stories and one very short poem. Believe it or not, the poem is the only thing in the book really about zombies and it is so short and sing-songy that it doesn't really even belong here. Although there may be some underlying joke between this fact and the title of the book itself, if I was Matthew I probably would have used the poem as an introduction to the book and changed the title to Nothing About Zombies or maybe even Nothing Against Zombies.

Speaking of an introduction, this book has a preface and a lengthy intro. In the preface, the author goes into more detail about landing an agent and getting published, but using POD to showcase his talent and to hopefully get noticed. This is followed by an introduction where he discusses what inspired each of the stories in the book. In my opinion skip all this, the first 24 pages of the book, because this author does actually have talent and the stories are much more worthy of being read rather than the young writer rant presented on the first two dozen pages.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. It's anthologies like this one that really take useful advantage of the POD publishing process like what Lulu has to offer. I've read and reviewed several short story, essay, and poetry anthologies since the beginning of this blog, and haven't found one that I didn't thoroughly enjoy. Unfortunately, books like these are often passed over by agents and traditional publishers because of their lack of appeal to a mainstream audience. Visit your local bookstore and ask them to direct you to their anthology section and see where they take you. Short story collections and literary essay anthologies are usually stashed next to the poetry. The bookseller will probably put Frost or Dickinson in your hand if you ask for a poetry collection, or someone like King or Sedaris in your hand if you ask for short stories; or they'll hand you some once featured collection (destined to become a bargain book) which was probably published in the 80s or early 90s which contains stories from authors I guarantee you've never heard of. Despite the erotica market really "embracing" the short story collection format lately, books like these are a dying breed. So kudos to Mr. Rowe for at least finding the right audience and the right place to showcase his work.

One good use of his introduction is that the author clues you in on the different styles and experimentation he was going for while writing each piece, while not giving too much away. For instance the first short story, "Selling Liberty," challenges a reader's interpretation of a character after being introduced half way through their scenario and not necessarily knowing what happened right from the beginning. Rowe's idea for this story came while watching a movie, and demonstrates the often intriguing things a writer encounters and finds inspiration in.

My favorite story follows this one. It's called "The Happily Ever After." After studying children's literature, Matthew decided he wanted to write an update to a classic and he chose Little Red Riding Hood in which Red is all grown up and challenged with possibly making the same mistakes she did back when she was a child. First of all, I'm a huge fan of authors who use any character or person we may already know from history or from another story and puts them into a new adventure. Michael Cunningham was a genious at this with exploring the life of Virginia Woolf in his acclaimed book The Hours. Rowe's use of the Red Riding Hood story is both original and noteworthy because he has written it in the exact same fairytale-like feel as the original is usually told.

My next favorite is called "Just a Fluke," and is pure Twilight Zone at its best in which a man wakes up to find himself trapped inside of a woman's body. Get your mind out of the gutter! It's not that type of story, although the short entitled "Au Naturale" is. With it, the author has penned a fine piece of erotica that's worthy of Playboy confessions, if not better.

Traditional horror topics of immortality and also werewolves are covered, along with the Grim Reaper himself who appears in Rowe's featured tale called "Don't Fear the Reaper." It was the story of the month in November 2005 at Dark Fiction UK. It follows a man who envisions himself as the reaper and uses his authority to target certain others who he thinks should die. If you were a fan of the television series, Dead Like Me, you will definitely enjoy this one!

As I've said, Rowe's take on supernatural and fantasy is original and whimsical. Forgetting a lack of brain eating zombies which has been done again and again both in writing and television, I was much more content with the themes and subjects Rowe chose to cover instead. He is indeed a promising young writer who deserves whatever acclaim comes his way. Keep up the good work, Matthew!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Courtesy of Teens Read Too 15 July 2008
By TeensReadToo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
NOT ALL OF THEM ABOUT ZOMBIES is a collection of ten short stories and a poem by a young, British writer. While it is difficult to categorize the stories into any one genre, they most definitely reflect the mind of someone who seems to be always asking, "what if...?"

There is a very amusing preface that seems to highlight the personality of the writer as he introduces his book. The introduction offers an explanation of each story and the origins of it. While it is always interesting to know where inspiration strikes and how a story comes to be, I recommend saving the introduction for later so that your mind is completely open as you are reading.

Among the stories included in this collection are some that seek to answer very unique questions. In "Selling Liberty" readers are placed in the middle of an evolving storyline. A girl is desperately trying to evade two men who are after her prize possession. Can you determine the true story from the point of view you are presented with?

Another question, posed in "The Happily Ever After," is what ever happened to Little Red Riding Hood? How did her experience with the Big Bad Wolf affect the rest of her life?

Mixed among the stories is a fair share of horror (werewolves and true fears realized) and sci-fi (imagine waking up as one entity in a shared body).

While author Matthew Rowe has presented some very imaginative ideas in this book, I must also mention that there is some very graphic, adult content in one of the stories.

NOT ALL OF THEM ABOUT ZOMBIES is available for purchase online.

Reviewed by: JodiG.
Touching on subjects such as the adulthood of Little Red Riding Hood, body swapping & facing ones dreams and fears 14 Aug. 2008
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Offbeat concepts have passed through everyone's head at one time or another. But what if one spared entirely too much thought for them? "Not All of Them About Zombies" is a compilation of stories by Matthew Rowe, touching on subjects such as the adulthood of Little Red Riding Hood, body swapping, facing ones dreams and fears, and more eclectic topics. As intriguing as it is hilarious, "Not All of Them About Zombies" is highly recommended for community library fiction collections.
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