Watch now

Quantity:1
Norwegian Wood [Blu-ray] has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Norwegian Wood [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Norwegian Wood [Blu-ray]


Price: £7.10 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
26 new from £7.10 8 used from £4.07 1 collectible from £29.81
£7.10 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on any movie or TV show available to buy or rent on Amazon Instant Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray dispatched from and sold by Amazon.co.uk. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Check out big titles at small prices with our Chart Offers in DVD & Blu-ray. Find more great prices at our DVD and Blu-ray Bargains Store.
  • Note: Blu-ray discs are in a high definition format and need to be played on a Blu-ray player. To find out more about Blu-ray, visit our Hi-Def Learn & Shop store.

  • Important Information on Firmware Updates: Having trouble with your Blu-ray disc player? Will certain discs just not play? You may need to update the firmware inside your player. Click here to learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

Norwegian Wood [Blu-ray] + Confessions [Blu-ray] + Kotoko [Blu-ray]
Price For All Three: £33.53

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Rinko Kikuchi, Kenichi Matsuyama
  • Directors: Anh Hung Tran
  • Format: Import, Blu-ray, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Soda Pictures Ltd.
  • DVD Release Date: 4 July 2011
  • Run Time: 133 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004TFCVUY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 66,413 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Published in 1987 and since translated into 33 languages, Norwegian Wood is a story of loss and heartbreak in a time of global instability.  Haruki Murakami’s bestselling novel is brought to the screen by Tran Anh Hung (Golden Lion winner for Cyclo and Academy Award nominee for The Scent of Green Papaya) and features Japanese rising star Kenichi Matsuyama (Death Note, Detroit Metal City) and Oscar nominee Rinko Kikuchi (Babel) alongside newcomer Kiko Mizuhara.

Tokyo, the late 1960s… Students around the world are uniting to overthrow the establishment and Toru Watanabe’s personal life is similarly in tumult.  At heart, he is deeply devoted to his first love, Naoko, a beautiful and introspective young woman.  But their complex bond has been forged by the tragic death of their best friend years before.  Watanabe lives with the influence of death everywhere.  That is, until Midori, a girl who is everything that Naoko is not – outgoing, vivacious, supremely self-confident – marches into his life and Watanabe must choose between his past and his future. 

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By J.E.T on 10 July 2011
Format: DVD
Norwegian Wood is a subtitled Japanese film, based on the book by Haruki Murakami. For those who don't know the plot, Wantabe is a teenage boy studying in Japan at a time of student protest. His own personal life reflects this turbulent backdrop, as he struggles to overcome the event that kickstarts this book, the suicide of his best friend. With 2 possible love interests, the beautiful and troubled Naoko, the ex of his best friend and an anchor to his past, and the vibrant and vivacious fellow student Midori, Wantabe has to choose between past and future, and life and death, which he seems to be caught in a world between. A notable line from The Beatle's song of the same name is "I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me" and this sums up the sense of the relationships in the film very accurately.

This film is fairly true to the book. All the key scenes are there and shot in the stunning and vivid way you see them in your mind, giving true justice to the scenes and emotions. There are some noticeable cuts, but overall enough was kept in to keep the plot true to itself and it is only what is to be expected anyway since not everything can be kept in and still make a good quality, none dragging, film. The only real criticism with the adaptation is that we don't get to know the background of the characters in any real way, which was a strong point of the book. It is definitely worth picking up a copy to read after if you see the film first, as so much more is gone into that feeds into the main plot and helps you understand influencing factors.

The actual shooting of this film is excellent.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Fahrenden Gesellen on 20 Aug. 2014
Format: DVD
An adaptation of a much-loved book must be a tricky undertaking. How to appeal to those who have read the book as well as those who haven't? Being one of the former, I was disappointed. The film was not a total failure by any means, but it could have been so much better. There were hints of greatness, but ultimately that just made it all the more frustrating. The first hour is not good. Long, dark, drawn-out scenes where the boy sleeps and the girl cries... a lot. The detail, nuance and richness of the novel appear mostly lost at first and the whole thing feels flat. I was almost ready to give up, but I persevered. The second hour is more satisfying. The story takes strange turns, emotions are evoked and the look, sound and feel are more visceral. Johhny Greenwood's score is disturbing, eerie and excellent; the choice of songs is dreadful. The Donovan-style 'Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary' made my skin crawl. The cinematography is often beautiful with the utilization of some stunning locations, though at times the direction is laughably clumsy. The screenplay is lifeless in some scenes and elevates the narrative tremendously in others. Those who have not read the book may feel bewildered by many aspects of the story. The film omits a lot of the novel's pertinent detail. The student protests are only hinted at. The relationship Wantanabe builds with the girl's sick father is reduced to a single wordless scene. The acting is excellent throughout and the performances help to carry the film along. One wonders at the money-spinning cynicism of adapting a popular, but mainly cerebral book by an author with global acclaim. Making a successful movie from a book like this would be a tough undertaking for even the most skilled of writers. There is a good film in here somewhere. With more consistency, we might have seen it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gwen on 9 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Norwegian Wood is a story of a boy living in Tokyo after his best friend kills himself. He meets his dead friend's girlfriend and they fall in love, but she is seriously depressed... A very complicated, intricate love story develops, with other characters interjecting. The atmosphere of the film has a quiet but not calm effect... Over all, a very stylistic film about a more modern period in Japanese history, but more importantly about a young man's life and sexual coming of age.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Dec. 2011
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
A beautiully constructed piece of cinematography, it captures a suspension of a moment, the same feelings Mishima rendered within his prose. This has a similar feel to Takeshi Kitano's "Dolls."

Tran the director, who is Vietnamese, has captured a soul of Japan, wrapped in the Mishima tradition. This is akin to his books being brought to death. Murakami, the author of this film/book has followed him into the deep dark emotional abyss. He peers behind the curtains to find a meaning, that lights up the world instead of seeking the perfect anhilation. This film is about those currents of emotional connection; friendship and trauma the resonances and the breaks. Both linger as a ball and chain throughout the life phases, captured in memories. This makes a powerful substatement for those who can read and project into the characters.

Families are primarily absent within the dialogue, and this creates another layer of industral alienation, a father is briefly glimpsed semi comatose, a man who has meant to live his dream, lies dying. Meanwhile his daughter covers up for her emotional toil. Emotional lies layer throughout the characterisation, as the characters play roles that lie outside of the their emotional needs, all to their detriment.

The film shows the destruction of people who cannot live within themselves and the problems that are created through role playing. It also has huge gaps around the life histories that drive people to the edges of existence. This gap says much in itself about the will to destruct.

Emotional absence litters the film, as sex is seen as an ejection onto a tissue, that happens to have a body attached. It is also used as a form of soul communication, belying its usual cheapening effect of instant arousal and orgasmic release.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback