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Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development Paperback – 18 Feb 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 3 edition (18 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415816505
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415816502
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.5 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 271,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

David Lewis is professor of Social Policy and Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

An anthropologist by background, he has written on a range of international development policy issues including technological change and rural development in Asia, the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in development, the economics and politics of Bangladesh, the concept of civil society, and the role of anthropologists in development.

He has carried out applied work with a range of international organisations, including DFID, Sida, BRAC and Save the Children (UK).

He is currently working on a co-edited book (with D Rodgers and M Woolcock) on public representations of development in films, novels and other media.

Product Description

Review

'Professor Lewis has given us an indispensable text on the evolution of management ideas in international development. It is a domain full of tension between the forces of professional management and social activism. Lewis brings an anthropologist's sensibility to this inquiry, showing that the messy realities of development require NGOs to craft new pluralistic models of management.' - Alnoor Ebrahim, Associate Professor, Social Enterprise Initiative, Harvard Business School

'This third edition comprehensively addresses the conceptualization, theory, and practice of NGO management. With the current global trend to delegate public sector tasks to NGOs and allocate vast resources to them, it is more important than ever to understand their roles and how they are managed. This book provides such in-depth and critical understanding in accessible language and illustrated with insightful examples. I strongly recommend this book to students and development practitioners alike.' - Dr. Sylvia I. Bergh, Senior Lecturer in Development Management and Governance, International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

'In this thoroughly revised and updated 3rd edition of Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development, David Lewis brings an anthropologists' sensitivities to understanding the operation and challenges faced by development NGOs. These important organizations play central, fast-growing, and often controversial roles in fostering equitable development and poverty alleviation throughout the world. Dr. Lewis draws on his detailed knowledge of organization theory and development studies, as well as his considerable practical fieldwork experience, to produce a book that breaks through the conventional categories to offer a highly original and nuanced understanding of this complex and fapidly-evolving field. More than merely a textbook, Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development is must reading for scholars and practitioners alike.' - Richard P. Appelbaum, Ph.D., MacArthur Chair in Sociology and Global & International Studies, Co-PI, Center for Nanotechnology and Society, University of California at Santa Barbara, USA

"Management is management’. Maybe, but in the NGO world, where political, social and financial uncertainties are the default position, it isn’t that straightforward. This important and wide-ranging book by a thoughtful veteran of the sector should be essential reading for those who think they understand the management challenges faced by NGOs, including NGO managers themselves.' - Ian Smilie, writer, researcher and consultant on NGOs and international development

'David Lewis has done it again! This is a superb, well-researched, comprehensive and objective portrayal of NGOs, their philosophy, practices and challenges. Yet another significant contribution from him on the discourse and the art and science of development.' - A. Mushtaque R. Chowdhury, PhD, Vice Chair and Interim Executive Director BRAC, Bangladesh

'With the ever increasing complexities in their working environment, managing and leading an NGO can be like groping in a dark jungle. Professor David Lewis' book, Non-Governmental Organizations: Management and Development, provides the much needed guidance and light that NGO managers and leaders have been seeking for so long.' - Chiku Malunga Co-editor NGO Management: The Earthscan Companion, author of Understanding Organizational Leadership through Ubuntu

About the Author

David Lewis is Professor of Social Policy and Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. A social anthropologist by training, he has degrees from the Universities of Cambridge and Bath. His main interests are the theory and practice of international development, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society, and rural development.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is essential to anyone, be it academic or practitioner, who has an interest in managing an NGO in a developing country. I still remember when I came across the first edition of the book as a student, and how excited I was about the clarity in which it was explained. With the revisions and updates this third edition the book still remains a must-have for every student of development and the management of NGOs. Sitting now at the other side of the table (as a Lecturer this time), one of the additional features that make this book so interesting is its companion website with additional materials (such as video clips).

In a world where inequalities between nations still exist and where neither the market nor the state seem to be able to deliver much needed goods and services to people in need, NGOs play a vital role in trying to alleviate much of this suffering. In order to do so effectively NGOs need to be organised and managed. Already since a decade or three we see NGOs professionalising their operations. Management, as Lewis discusses in this book, is no longer a bad word to be avoided. This means we need to find ways in which management can work for NGOs. In the light of the many discussions with regard to increasing Aid Effectiveness, understanding management in development NGOs is one of the important questions academics and practitioners ask themselves.

In this third edition of what is probably one of the few comprehensive and theoretically grounded books on managing development NGOs Lewis tries to answer this question. The book starts by giving us an overview of the context in which these organisations operate, the debate on management in NGOs and the various understandings of the concept of ‘NGOs’.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An essential resource for students, practitioners and academics 15 Oct. 2014
By FCL - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is essential to anyone, be it academic or practitioner, who has an interest in managing an NGO in a developing country. I still remember when I came across the first edition of the book as a student, and how excited I was about the clarity in which it was explained. With the revisions and updates this third edition the book still remains a must-have for every student of development and the management of NGOs. Sitting now at the other side of the table (as a Lecturer this time), one of the additional features that make this book so interesting is its companion website with additional materials (such as video clips).

In a world where inequalities between nations still exist and where neither the market nor the state seem to be able to deliver much needed goods and services to people in need, NGOs play a vital role in trying to alleviate much of this suffering. In order to do so effectively NGOs need to be organised and managed. Already since a decade or three we see NGOs professionalising their operations. Management, as Lewis discusses in this book, is no longer a bad word to be avoided. This means we need to find ways in which management can work for NGOs. In the light of the many discussions with regard to increasing Aid Effectiveness, understanding management in development NGOs is one of the important questions academics and practitioners ask themselves.

In this third edition of what is probably one of the few comprehensive and theoretically grounded books on managing development NGOs Lewis tries to answer this question. The book starts by giving us an overview of the context in which these organisations operate, the debate on management in NGOs and the various understandings of the concept of ‘NGOs’. Part II takes us through various debates on the theory of NGO management. The final part of the book zooms in on the practice of NGO management. One of the strong points of the book, in my eyes, is its interdisciplinary approach. Lewis does not shy away from introducing a number of different disciplines and theoretical lenses to help us understand the issues, the context and the complexities (and it is messy out there on the ground) of managing development NGOs. In this academically well informed book, Lewis does not forget to bring us back to reality and practice by highlighting stories, practices and real life experiences in a number of explanatory boxes scattered across the various chapters.

Informed by his extensive experience of working in a number of developing countries this book is and remains one of the most important and influential books written on the management of development NGOs.
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