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A Nomad of the Time Streams: A Scientific Romance (Eternal Champion) Hardcover – Aug 1995


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Hardcover, Aug 1995
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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: White Wolf Pub; Subsequent edition (Aug. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565041798
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565041790
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 3.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,812,835 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Michael Moorcock (1939-) Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback
Philip Pullman's Amber Knife, Moore's From Hell, Talbot's Luther Arkwright, Mieville's Perdido Street Station, Morrison's Invisibles -- you name them, they all recognise Moorcock as the originator of what is sometimes called 'steam punk' but which I call 'alternate urban adventure' since they tend to focus on the darker aspects of City Life. But what Moorcock also shares with these authors is his constant, unwavering suspicion of authority. Before this there were no steam-driven airships and the like,
no alternative futures, no examination of the underbelly of government, no dark, alternate Londons. This looks at three imperial dreams -- the British, the American and the Russian -- and shows in the first -- and by far the best -- Warlord of the Air how those empires are maintained by injustice, brutality and hypocrisy. Moorcock has not just given us a lot of good, original stories -- he has given many different authors who followed him a range of different methods. This is one method (the future as seen from the past) but Jerry Cornelius is another, Dancers at the End of Time are another and, of course, he changed the whole face of fantasy fiction with Elric and Co -- and that's without mentioning the literary fiction, the Pyat books, Mother London and all the non-fiction. In the 60s and early 70s Moorcock anticipated Black Holes and the Multiverse, both ideas once considered too outrageous by science, now highly respectable ideas debated in NATURE and NEW SCIENTIST. His scientific vision alone ranks him beside Wells and Clarke and his words have entered the language in the same way.
Oswald Bastable is a decent, idealistic young Army officer on the North West Frontier, circa 1900.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. W. Bell on 30 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
The first of these stories, "Warlord of the Air" can be taken in two ways; either as a brilliant and imaginative stand-alone work in the steampunk sci-fi genre (one of the first of its kind), or as part of the Eternal Champion Saga for which Moorcock is famous. Steampunk concerns iself with alternate futures where technology has taken distinctly differnet routes (usually steam power), and this novel plays it out in a wonderfully real way, blowing your mind with its great airships, and charmingly British feel to it!
The second story, "The Land Leviathan", is not bad in many respects, is shows Bastable's moral evolution, though it just seems to lack the finesse of the first, and is clearly not as well thought out. It does however begin to show Bastable's role as the Eternal Champion towards the end.
The third story is an all out sequel to the first book, and is undoubtably an eternal champion novel, complete with all the complex multiverse metaphysics that can really bog the story down. The story in this book is electric and should be fast paced if not for the pages and pages of pointless dialogue that you wouldn't find outside of a world summit of philosophy PHD's, or an episode of Dawson's Creek.
Despite seeming a little sterile in places where characterisation is weak, this is a great novel and well worth the time, even if you aren't a Moorcock verteran the first story is worth the price of the book alone
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Greg Boyd on 19 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Michael Moorcock is a brilliant character writer. All of his books are full of intriguing and cleverly written characters and this collection is no exception. In fact, this trilogy is particularly good in that aspect. Oswald Bastable is written consistently and convincingly throughout.

It is, as usual, easy to read but not overly simplistic. Moorcock writes about incredibly complicated and mind-boggling things in such a way that it doesn't stop the natural lyrical flow of the book. A Nomad of the Time Streams is full of sci-fi jargon about time travel, alternate realities and, of course, the multiverse but never gets bogged down in techno-babble.

The stories themselves are very creative. Time travel and alternate realities are not new ideas but Moorcock makes you feel like they are. The exploration of ethics, politics and relationships in a multiverse full of infinite possible realities is completely inspired and, while some of the authors own views (particularly concerning anarchism) are made abundantly obvious, the reader is never preached and it feels more like an exercise in observation rather than a social comment.

There is a deliberate pattern to the three books which makes reading them one immediately after the other a particularly rewarding experience as this builds up to an interesting climax in the final book. As much as the pattern is unmissable, the second and third books are not just re-writes of the first under another name but they build on the themes and would not, therefore, fare particularly well as stand-alone books.

Unlike the
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Croaker99 on 1 July 2003
Format: Paperback
These stories are pulp fiction - quick to read, simple in structure, and disposable. They're also written by Moorcock, which means witty, exciting, strange, and thoroughly enjoyable. Lacking the pathos or depth found spread through other multiverse stories, these three novels are "just" huge fun. Don't be suprised if you put the book down to find that the hours have flown by and you've finished it at a sitting!
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