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Nod Paperback – Abridged, Audiobook, Box set


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Product details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Bluemoose Books Ltd (31 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0956687695
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956687692
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,275 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Adrian Barnes lives in Rossland, British Columbia where he skis, runs, writes, renovates, works, eats, sleeps, and then writes some more.

Product Description

Review

The apocalypse comes in many forms, but none stranger than that of the chronic sleep deprivation that leads to mass psychosis in Adrian Barnes's audacious novel Nod (Bluemoose, £7.99). Paul is a misanthropic hack writing a non-fiction book about obscure words when the world is afflicted and the majority of citizens begin to hallucinate solipsistic realities that Paul, as a Sleeper and a wordsmith, can influence. Barnes employs this brilliant idea to explore the nature of perception, redemption, and personal and social catastrophe. Outstanding. --The Guardian

About the Author

Adrian Barnes was born in Blackpool, England but grew up in Canada. He teaches English at Selkirk College, British Columbia. He lives in Rossland, near Vancouver, where he lives with his wife, Charlene and two sons, Liam and Ethan

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Mcormack on 26 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
Nod Review:
By Matthew McCormack

Adrien Barnes' first novel is a masterclass of humane insight and intelligent plotting, set during the last waking hours of human kind.

Except for a limited few, man has stopped sleeping. With no cure and the scientific promise of total body failure after four weeks of sleep deprivation, man slips into a psychotic stupor.
With no boundaries and no brigades to enforce people, mankind is a truly free race. Political and social boundaries are reset, no person is better off than their neighbour, they are all doomed.
Within a week of sleep deficiency, people's minds' begin to shatter, transforming them into deranged and carnivorous victims' of a life without sleep.
John, our narrator, can sleep; he is an introverted individual, and through his sight and mind, we read his narrative on the last days of humanity.

While this all appears distinctly post-apocalyptic, it would be rude to categorise it as such.
This is a deeply insightful look at what actually makes us human, explored through John and his thoughts, and the behaviour he witness from the depraved humans. In the author's own words, he describes this as, `Speculative Fiction', and this serves as a thoroughly appropriate term. The vision of a dystopian world is mere happenstance to what is affecting people's minds. To thoughts and feelings people carry every day; now released as once fenced minds crumble.

Adriens' writing is smooth, accessible and intelligent.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Minton on 23 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There were many more things which I liked about Adrian Barnes's "Nod" than there were things that I disliked, and yet several weeks after reading it I find that it is the things I disliked which are most colouring my reactions to the book. Which is a shame, because the things I like, I really liked a lot.

It's a hard book to review, because I think it's good, and original, and it deserves readers, and I hope it will go on and get lots of them, but if I want to do a fair review then I have to mention the things which I found problematic, and this may spoil the experience for people who have not yet tried the book.

In a publishing universe where the end of the world seems to come round with monotonous regularity, Barnes has found an ingenious way of bringing about the collapse of society. Suddenly, without warning or explanation, almost all of humanity discovers that it is no longer able to sleep. In a matter of days, psychosis sets in and all the complex, delicate systems which hold our world together fall apart.

He has also found an interesting narrative voice to describe what is happening. His narrator, Paul, is cool, detached, distrustful, even before the world begins to go to hell. He is a man who has always mistrusted what lies beneath the surface, has always expected collapse, the onset of chaos. Paul's description of how the end of the world is felt in one small corner of one Canadian city, is all the more effective for its elegance and control, the way that the horror and pity and terror of the ending of everything is obliquely hinted at rather than being splurged all over the page. This voice, on its own, is enough to justify you spending a couple of hours with this book.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. Wallwork on 26 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback
Nod is a novel that only comes around every five to ten years. It takes that long for a writer to create a piece of fiction that actually has something say and is unique. Nod is that book. It tells the tale of Paul who finds himself an unlikely prophet after his manuscript on the etymology of words becomes a surrogate bible to a city who cannot sleep.

Vancouver is the backcloth to this insomnia epidemic, one that has gripped nearly every one of its inhabitants, save for a few individuals, like Paul, who go by the collective noun Sleepers. The Awakened are zombie-like insomniacs shuffling around the city, wanting sleep, slowly going crazy and dying, or killing themselves just to fall into eternal darkness. One of these Awakened is a local vagabond called Charles, known by Paul, who comes into possession of the manuscript, and as such, sees himself as a sort of apostle, a person who believes within the construct of its words and phrases hides hope, a kind of instructional manual for a new world. Charles convinces the Awakened that this disease is only to purge the world of society's flotsam, and that soon, there will be a uprising, a new beginning, and the Nod manuscript will govern their lives forevermore. The destruction and breakdown of civilization is only part of the story, a necessary sacrifice to deliver a narrative rich with religious, ethic, and philosophical dichotomies, in particular, "good and evil". The desire of sleep is the catalyst to behavioural explosions where being morally positive is consumed by the morally negative.

Adrian Barnes has successfully delivered a very simple dystopian story here; a nation in the throes of panic, frenzy, poverty, collapse and psychosis.
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