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Noble Beast [VINYL]

4.3 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

Price: £32.66 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£32.66 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Vinyl (3 Feb. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Fat Possum/Red
  • ASIN: B001LTVBWU
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 251,501 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Fat Possum Records * 180g * 2LP * gatefold * stereo * US * * *

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Mike on 26 Jan. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Andrew Bird has a wonderful four albums to his name - the multi-instrumentalist (including classically-trained violinist) reached his zenith with The Mysterious Production Of Eggs, a gorgeous, clever, sophisticated delight of an album. Were you to imagine a muso Jeff Buckley, you'd not be far wrong, with Bird's wonderfully warm, soaring voice accompanying his pizzicato violin, and (often simultaneously) multi-tracked instruments. Noble Beast is a bit of a departure, and not an entirely welcome one. Whereas he's been pretty self-reliant in past, this album sees him rope in some members of Wilco to indie up the sound. The result, with Mark Nevers (producer of Lambchop and Calexico) at the desks, is a little one-dimensional - nice enough, but lacking the kind of flights of fancy that entertained so much, and that can easily be misclassified as experimental. It is an album that has a stronger crust to break through, and once in it is a little flat. Bird seems to have taken himself pretty seriously here - the whimsy of his music lost. Instead, Noble Beast sounds like later-era Paul Simon, but played and sung beautifully. (This review also refers only to CD1...)
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By Syriat TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD
I've never heard Andrew Bird before so when Noble Beast came through I didn't know what to expect. But what i got was a real find. What I got was acoustic guitar, a great voice, strings and oh...some whistling.

It starts off with Oh No and its great chorus of 'Arm in arm we are the harmless sociopaths', Lyrically its pretty good as well. On Masterswarm his voice reminds me of Thom Yorke for some reason at the beginning.
Fitz and Dizzy Spells is a great feel good number that bounces along and is one of my personal favourites. The album veers between feelgood and the heavier numbers. Both work well. It reminds me of of It's Heavy in Here - by Eric Matthews It's Heavy in Herefor some reason. I think its the way it uses strings and tracks start and never end in the same way. The best example of this is my personal favourite Anonanimal. Again there are echos of Radiohead here towards the end when the drums kick in and we could be listening to something from Hail to the Thief.

The more I listen the more I pick out. And having seen the live version of Andrew Bird I must say I can't wait for a new offering.
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By The Wolf TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Jun. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Mr Bird is that rarest of creatures. Namely one who still
understands and values the gentle art of whistling.
Bird by name and bird by nature. This most eminently portable
of musical instruments has all but disappeared from the world.
My own Father could whistle well and passed on the gift to me.

That this simple and highly effective tool is kept alive and
utilised substantially on 'Noble Beast' deserves our applause !

Hand-clapping, too, gets more than a little piece of the action.

These spartan skills, combined with the artist's multi-instrumental
capabilites, have amalgamated in a collection of 12 fine songs
(and two brief sonic interludes) of which he can be very proud.

I understand that this is Mr Bird's fifth studio album.
I have to admit that this is my first encounter with his work
and that his devotees will already be far ahead of me in their
understanding and appreciation of his labours.
What I have heard here, however, is clear evidence of a major talent.

This is classy songwriting which doesn't need to declare itself
from the rooftops or dress up in gaudy fashionable vestments.
The melodies are inventive and strong; the arrangements occasionally
complex but always lucid.

Mr Bird's highish tenor voice communicates the warmth,
invention and good humour of his lyrics with alacrity.

So many treats here it's hard to know quite where to start.

'Nomenclature', despite its relative brevity, is an absolute
jewel of a song. Violin, percussion and exqusite harmonies
coalesce in a truly memorable performance.
Read more ›
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Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
I recently discovered Andrew Bird and as a fan of such leftfield "indie" as Radiohead, Sufjan Stevens, Belle & Sebastian and Tindersticks this was right up my street. Noble Beast is leftfield in its unusual song structures (note the crescendo then sudden fade in Souverian) and in particular in Bird's brilliant violin playing which is present throughout. The clever wordplay stands out, my favourite example being at the start of Tenuousness: "From proto-Sanskrit Minoans to Porto-centric Lisboans, Greek Cypriots and harbor sorts who hang around in ports a lot". There is also Bird's whistling which seems to divide opinion, but for me works in the context of the songs.

If I had to choose highlights, I might go for the catchy Fitz And The Dizzy Spells, the experimental Radiohead like sound of Not A Robot, But A Ghost or the simply beautiful The Privateers. However, that would be to ignore all the other brilliant tracks herein, which make choosing highlights seem somewhat churlish. Indeed I would be hard pressed to name another album completely devoid of weaker tracks. Put simply, this is one of the best albums I have heard. Ever.
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