Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 2.80

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

No Way to Run an Economy: Why the System Failed and How to Put It Right [Paperback]

Graham Turner
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 12.99
Price: 11.37 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.62 (12%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 26 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover 45.00  
Paperback 11.37  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

7 Sep 2009
In The Credit Crunch, Graham Turner predicted that banks would be nationalised and interest rates would be reduced too slowly to halt the crisis. His predictions were correct. His new book, No Way to Run an Economy, is the essential guide to the turbulent times ahead.

Turner recommended radical measures, such as quantitative easing, in early 2008 but argues that action has been taken too late and been too timid to make a real difference. He dissects the policy mistakes of the last 12 months including Obama's doomed market-led response to the crisis and the obsession of central banks with the red herring of inflation.

There is no doubt the economy is still in serious trouble, but Turner shows that learning from the mistakes made so far can prevent a situation worse than that of the 1930s crisis.

Frequently Bought Together

No Way to Run an Economy: Why the System Failed and How to Put It Right + The Credit Crunch: Housing Bubbles, Globalisation and the Worldwide Economic Crisis
Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Press (7 Sep 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745329764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745329765
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.5 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 769,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Turner argues that we urgently need a thorough rethink of the shareholder model that blindly chases short-term profit and denies a voice to workers - and, indeed, to small investors. And you don't have to be a Marxist to think he has a point. (New Statesman)

About the Author

Graham Turner is the author of the Credit Crunch (Pluto Press, 2008) and founder of GFC Economics, an independent economic consultancy which provides forecasting services for some of the world's largest banks. He has worked in the financial sector for over 20 years, spending the 1990s working for Japanese banks.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Roots And Remedies 10 July 2010
By S Wood
Format:Paperback
Presently, with the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition in power in the UK, it seems that the roots of the current economic woes in The Credit Crunch have been consigned to some dark recess, while "our" government gears itself up to apply what is perhaps best described as a Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) to the United Kingdom, one that will make the IMF's intervention in the Labour Government (1976) seem like a picnic. Graham Turner, with over twenty years experience of working in the financial sector, is well qualified to bring the reader back to the reality of the problems roots, and how they continue to effect the global economy, with particular emphasis on the situation in the United States and the United Kingdom.

While the current focus is on government debt Turner reminds us that the problems relating to mortgages, consumer debt, interest and the availability of credit are far from happily resolved. His many graphs indicate a number of continuing problems, such as the fact that financial sectors writing down of problem mortgage and consumer debt has diverged from the growing levels of debt delinquency in order for banks to declare increases in profitability.

With regard to the longer term issues that have been at the root of the credit crunch Turner identifies a number of issues such as globalisations negative effect on wages as a share of GDP, the impetus this shortfall has provided for the increasing levels of consumer debt, and the lack of controls with regard to the financial sector. He also reflects on the Marxist and Keynesian analysis of the credit crunch.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting analysis from a Marxist viewpoint 12 May 2012
By Ioannis Glinavos VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
This title offers an interesting analysis that combines the best of Keynes and Marx without the dogmatism that often paints Marxists. What the book does is link traditional Marxixt 'crisis of profit' analysis with the causes of the financial crisis. You can read this along with Robert Reich's analysis of stagnant wages and credit as a tool for sustaining purchasing power. The weaker points are the conclusion where a suggestion to abandon the shareholder model is made but not analysed and the fact that the book is rather dated (analysis from 2009). Worth reading!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
4.0 out of 5 stars Roots And Remedies 19 Mar 2012
By S Wood - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Presently, with the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition in power in the UK, it seems that the roots of the current economic woes in The Credit Crunch have been consigned to some dark recess, while "our" government gears itself up to apply what is perhaps best described as a Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) to the United Kingdom, one that will make the IMF's intervention in the Labour Government (1976) seem like a picnic. Graham Turner, with over twenty years experience of working in the financial sector, is well qualified to bring the reader back to the reality of the problems roots, and how they continue to effect the global economy, with particular emphasis on the situation in the United States and the United Kingdom.

While the current focus is on government debt Turner reminds us that the problems relating to mortgages, consumer debt, interest and the availability of credit are far from happily resolved. His many graphs indicate a number of continuing problems, such as the fact that financial sectors writing down of problem mortgage and consumer debt has diverged from the growing levels of debt delinquency in order for banks to declare increases in profitability.

With regard to the longer term issues that have been at the root of the credit crunch Turner identifies a number of issues such as globalisations negative effect on wages as a share of GDP, the impetus this shortfall has provided for the increasing levels of consumer debt, and the lack of controls with regard to the financial sector. He also reflects on the Marxist and Keynesian analysis of the credit crunch.

As for solutions, Turner thinks that a substantial increase in quantitive easing is the least worst way of ensuring that the economies of the US and UK dont enter into a deflationary spiral reminiscent of Japan in the 1990's and beyond. He is also in favour of reforming the current shareholder model of corporate capitalism in favour of one that democratically reflects the interests of workers and the wider community, the meaningful nationalisation of banks, and modifications to the global economic structures to provide space for the meaningful participation of employees in the economic sphere.

"No Way To Run The Economy" is a fascinating read. The statistically minded will be in seventh heaven with Turners 70+ graphs that concisely illustrate much of what is discussed in the text. The shortcomings of this book are that it is too short for the breadth of the subject, and it also (presumably to be optimally relevant upon publication) appears to have been written in a bit of a hurry. Some complicated matters are well explained, others left this reader scratching his head, and while the glossary is welcome it is far from exhaustive. Despite these flaws, Turner has written a valuable and informative book that is a good bit more relevant to the economic problems we face than any amount of George Osbornes or Vince Cables babblings ever will be.
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xa3c1c114)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback