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No Way Out Paperback – 10 Jun 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 520 pages
  • Publisher: Avon (10 Jun. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847561837
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847561831
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,241,944 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Kessler is a British author of mystery novels and thrillers. Born into a Jewish family in London just before the swinging sixties, he dropped out of school at the age of 15. Shortly thereafter, he wrote a screenplay that he showed to his mother's cousin, movie director Clive Donner. Although never produced, the screenplay made Kessler realize that he wanted to become a writer.

But it wasn't until he was in his late thirties that he secured a publishing contract from Hodder Headline. He had four thrillers published by Hodder in the late nineties, but was then dropped, along with many other mid-list writers, during a slump in publishing. At the same time, he courted controversy by co-writing a book about the murder of Rachel Nickell called Who Really Killed Rachel? with Colin Stagg the man who had been falsely accused of the murder. The book (published in 1999 by a small publisher, after the major publishers turned it down) named Robert Napper as one of four credible suspects. Nine years later, Napper pleaded guilty to the crime after new DNA technology and other forensic evidence established his guilt.

Kessler made a comeback in 2009 when he signed a three book deal with the Avon division of HarperCollins UK for a series of books about a San Francisco lawyer, Alex Sedaka.

Product Description

Review

‘This will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end.’
Closer

‘No Way Out is impossible to put down.’
Closer

About the Author

David Kessler dropped out of school at the age of 15 and was self-educated from then on. He struggled for 25 years to become a published author before finally making his breakthrough with A Fool for a Client, a legal thriller set in New York. This was followed up by The Other Victim, Tarnished Heroes and Reckless Justice. He also courted controversy by co-writing Who Really Killed Rachel (about the Wimbledon Common murder) with Colin Stagg, the man who was falsely accused of the crime. The book is now out of print, but since then, the real murderer - who was named in the book - has been convicted of the crime.


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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. Cotton on 4 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
`No Way Out' follows the lives of multiple characters as they come together in defence of previous convicted criminal, but born- again Christian, Elias Claymore.
When I began reading, I was immediately transported into the novel and firmly gripped by an exciting plot and believable, amiable characters - I did not want to put the book down.
The chapters are split into dates and times, while also alternating between characters, which gives the novel a very realistic feeling. The characters were also fantastic. I loved Alex Sedaka right from the beginning; he held the same charm and appeal as Kate Atkinson's leading character, Jackson Brodie; the strong-minded, caring and protective character with a real sense of justice. I also sympathised immediately with Elias Claymore. I was convinced from the beginning that he was the innocent party, and despite his cruel and reckless past, I instantly liked him. In contrast to this, Bethel Newton, the young girl accusing Claymore of raping her, was a character that I sympathised with in the beginning, but grew to dislike her throughout the course of the novel.

Conversely to this, as the reader is bought more deeply into the plot and the trial, I found myself becoming a little bored at times. This was not due to any fault in the story, but more to do with the depth in which the DNA evidence was described. While it is obvious that David Kessler has researched the topics in his novel well, I found myself skipping paragraphs at a time when explaining the more complicated aspects of the DNA evidence, simply because parts of it were out of my understanding.

However, the ending to the novel was mostly excellent; full of action, danger and plenty of plot twists to keep the reader full of suspense right until the final word.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By SbrKaye on 12 Sept. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I decided to read this after reading the author's earlier outing Mercy, in which the hero, Alex Sedaka, was introduced. Like its predecessor, this is an intriguing and complex legal thriller which is similarly marred to some extent by over-complexity. In this case, the problem concerned the DNA evidence, where the author appeared to be trying to give it one twist too many, and I found it quite hard to follow.

The basic plot-line of the book - the trial of a black TV talk-show host accused of rape - is an interesting one. And the events that unfold, both in and out of the courtroom, are quite gripping. Once again, Kessler raises questions that have cropped up in several of his previous works, such as the morality of private vengeance and the possibility of personal redemption. None of the characters are morally flawless. But that is not to say that they are unsympathetic. Quite the contrary. It is because they are flawed, yet in most cases, well-intentioned, that they are believable and human. The lawyer is no saint. But he has a sense of duty - as well as a sense of loyalty. The accused has demons in his closet - yet (and I hope I am not giving too much away) - he is not lacking in ideals. Other characters, both good and bad, are motivated by events in their past. The author is by no means morally neutral, but he recognizes that even villainy has its causes. This avoidance of comic book heroism and villainy is probably the book's greatest strength.

I think that if the author had retained the moral complexities but ditched - or at least played down - the scientific complexities, this would have qualified as a superlative LITERARY novel. As it is, I would rate it as a good thriller, not as fast-paced as its predecessor, but psychologically a lot deeper.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I bite on 23 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
I'm sorry, I'm going to waffle a little to begin with.
What makes a good novel? It is said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and this must also apply to reading material. When I review a book on Amazon I look at the plot, the characterisation, the dialogue, the setting and the author's style. Finally I assess if reading it left me feeling it was a worthwhile journey to make.
Lately I have been mildly dissatisfied with the offerings of well-known authors, some of whom seem content to rest on their reputations, and have been casting around for new (to me) writers. In doing so I have come across some real finds. The American author, Fred Limberg and British writer Ed Lane to name but two, both of whom write with a freshness that is ... well ... refreshing.
It was in this mood that I picked up this book by David Kessler.
Kessler is very brave. He has chosen a genre that is populated by some of the best American writers; a Brit going head-to-head on the battleground of the American legal system and doing a reasonable job of it. His work echoes that of Grisham and Michael Connelly, where his Alex Sedaka owes a nodding acquaintance to The Lincoln Lawyer but it is nonetheless a workmanlike tome.
In this book Kessler deals with the uncomfortable subject of black on white rape. Two of his characters are in a sapphic relationship and are buried under a whole heap of backstory. None of the characters, including the MC, Alex Sedaka, are sympathetic, I couldn't grow to like them, they all had various monkeys on their shoulders and were by turn venal, self-absorbed, cruel and slippery.
Dialogue lacked the spark of the Americans and was too often followed by a touch of adverb-itis, (he said condescendingly).
Kessler tries too hard to place us in the Bay area.
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