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No War: America's Real Business in Iraq Paperback – 2 Jun 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Gibson Square Books Ltd; First Edition edition (2 Jun. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903933579
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903933572
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 1 x 17 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 467,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist and author. She is currently doing research on an in-depth analysis of the way the Bush administration exports democracy. She is a former Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics. Three further essays were included at the suggestion of Naomi Klein. Developing the theme of Anglo-US interests in Iraq, they are by Susan Watkins, editor of the New Left Review, Bryan Mealer, correspondent for Harper’s Magazine and Walter Laqueur, co-chair of the International Research Council at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Susan Watkins is the editor of the New Left Review, Bryan Mealer, is a correspondent for Harper s Magazine and Walter Laqueur, co-chair of the International Research Council at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Tom MacFarlane on 3 Jun. 2005
Format: Paperback
Baghdad Year Zero, by Naomi Klien, is the first of three sections to this short, no-holds-barred, account of the truth behind the spin.
Much comment, even from supporters of the Iraq War, has focussed on how the coalition lost the peace. Accepted mythology has it that the allies had no plan of action: they assumed they would be made welcome, but the ungrateful Iraqis had other ideas.
This book explains why. Bush and his NeoCon Junta had a plan for postwar Iraq which involved a giant experiment in NeoCon theory. Iraq would be the first country in the world to be rebuilt by private enterprise, US corporation style. McDonalds and Wal Mart would enter Iraq, and the population would enjoy burgers, and slap their buttocks in delight for ever and a day.
How to do it? Simple, whilst the Iraqis were in a state of shock, all state industries would be privatised, and a corporate paradise would be created in a matter of weeks, if not days.
Bremer's first action was to sack 500,000 public sector workers. The reaction of many was to join the armed resistance as a kind of "alternative employment" scheme.
Not what Bush et.al. had in mind.
Pragmatists, like Colin Powell, and General Jay Garner planned to "fix the infrastructure, hold quick and dirty elections, (and) leave the shock therapy to the IMF." (Just like in Russia, where the IMF's money found its way to a certain football team.)
Cheney, Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz (soon to be running the World Bank) had other ideas. They were supported by exiles like Ahmad Chalabi - whose assets had been confiscated in 1958 - whose aim was the "de-Baathification" of Iraq.
The rest, as they say is history, or would be if only we would listen to Blair and "move on."
How much, I wonder, did Blair actually know of Plan Corporate Paradise? Was he told? Or was he jetting off on his next crusade?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Parsons on 14 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
Yet another very essential if short book from Klein, insightful and worth reading as soon as possible and very relative to our times.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Reeve on 23 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent.
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6 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Tom MacFarlane on 3 Jun. 2005
Format: Paperback
Baghdad Year Zero, by Naomi Klien, is the first of three sections to this short, no-holds-barred, account of the truth behind the spin.
Much comment, even from supporters of the Iraq War, has focussed on how the coalition lost the peace. Accepted mythology has it that the allies had no plan of action: they assumed they would be made welcome, but the ungrateful Iraqis had other ideas.
This book explains why. Bush and his NeoCon Junta had a plan for postwar Iraq which involved a giant experiment in NeoCon theory. Iraq would be the first country in the world to be rebuilt by private enterprise, US corporation style. McDonalds and Wal Mart would enter Iraq, and the population would enjoy burgers, and slap their buttocks in delight for ever and a day.
How to do it? Simple, whilst the Itaqis were in a state of shock, all state industries would be privatised, and a corporate paradise would be created in a matter of weeks, if not days.
Bremer's first action was to sack 500,000 public sector workers. The reaction of many was to join the armed resistance as a kind of "alternative employment" scheme.
Not what Bush et.al. had in mind.
Pragmatists, like Colin Powell, and General Jay Garner planned to "fix the infrastructure, hold quick and dirty elections, (and) leave the shock therapy to the IMF." (Just like in Russia, where the IMF's money found its way to Stamford Bridge!)
Cheney, Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz (soon to be running the World Bank) had other ideas. They were supported by exiles like Ahmad Chalabi - whose assets had been confiscated in 1958 - whose aim was the "de-Baathification" of Iraq.
The rest, as they say is history, or would be if only we would listen to Blair and "move on."
How much, I wonder, did Blair actually know of Plan Corporate Paradise? Too much detail?
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2 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Kasia on 25 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
Everything was good: book was new as it was said in the advertisement, delivery was on time. No problems. No reasons to moan ;)
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