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No Man's Land Paperback – 19 Nov 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (19 Nov. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571160883
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571160884
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 0.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 448,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

Of No Man's Land by Harold Pinter, The Times wrote 'The work of our best . . . playwright in its command of the language and its power to erect a coherent structure in a twilight zone of confusion and dismay.'

About the Author

Harold Pinter was born in London in 1930. He lived with Antonia Fraser from 1975 and they married in 1980. In 1995 he won the David Cohen British Literature Prize, awarded for a lifetime's achievement in literature. In 1996 he was given the Laurence Olivier Award for a lifetime's achievement in theatre. In 2002 he was made a Companion of Honour for services to literature. In 2005 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature and, in the same year, the Wilfred Owen Award for Poetry and the Franz Kafka Award (Prague). In 2006 he was awarded the Europe Theatre Prize and, in 2007, the highest French honour, the Légion d'honneur. He died in December 2008.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Customer on 17 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback
I happened to stumble upon this online and thought I'd give it a shot. At first I was not so impressed; finding it hard to understand - not the language, which is fairly easy. I found the plot itself and the interaction between the characters confusing. I was not great at analysis in school (and not punctuation either - as you can see), but I decided to give it another try.

After my second attempt, analyzing as I went, I realized how compelling the characters actually were. They're all rude and tiresome, annoying and confusing... yet somehow I found their development (or perhaps lack thereof) enliven the plot. Some lines seem pointless at first, but make complete sense when gazing at the entire picture. If you enjoy having to analyze a bit (or maybe you won't have to), and find a story about a group of men all different, trying to disrupt each other's lives, then read No Man's Land. It is inspiring and haunting with a tad of sarcastic humor. Some might say it is boring and confusing, though I am positive that it can bring great inspiration to aspirating writers - being one myself. Perhaps 5 stars is a bit extreme, yet I find that it needs more than three or four - yet, this is merely my personal opinion. I wrote in the title that it was "ominous", and what do I mean? I guess I was going for the feeling I had when reading it. There is something about the insanity that slowly overcomes every character that signaled that the outcome could only be bad. I am not going to write exactly what happens, because it is difficult to describe - it can only be experienced.

Harold Pinter is a somewhat forgotten artist, but surely deserves the same remembrance as any classic playwright!
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By Ann on 30 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I did like this play. I'm not sure that I can say why exactly, as it was quite the struggle figuring out what it was actually about. Not a lot of actual action going on, other than conversation. Sometimes when I thought I'd started to understand the plot and the characters, I realized I had no clue at all. I had to read this for my Literature course, and even though I didn't read it by choice I'm happy I did. It's short and seemingly easy to go through in less than a day (which it is of course), but there is just so much more to the story. Reading between the lines I found meanings I didn't know were even there, and maybe some I made up as I went along. In the end, I understood from the play that words sometimes speak louder than action, and that No Man 'owns' the Land in which we play the game of conversing. Is any of what the characters are sharing even true? Or is it all a game to try to be the better man, the better conversationist? To me, this is all about power through words rather than actions - that no matter name, status, riches and such, as long as you enter the game of conversing any man is an equal and only as good as his/her word.

I guess I'd recommend this to people interested in plays with lots of dialogues (and monologues?), and interested in language and the power that comes with it... Hard to say, but I think this is intended for those especially interested in this kind of psychological thing.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
reading the script was doubly enjoyable as one remembered how well the lines were delivered by the wonderful cast. 2 Nov. 2014
By Harvey F. Nagler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After seeing the play, reading the script was doubly enjoyable as one remembered how well the lines were delivered by the wonderful cast.
2 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Great but confussing 11 April 2000
By "g17nick" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was very good. It was very complex and made you think a lot. It was an odd book but I like odd books. I gave it four stars because it was confussing and hard to understand. But overall it was great.
0 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Good 20 Sept. 2001
By Jeff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is a good book. Read it. Very interesting and fun too!
1 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Classic Robb White 23 Jun. 2005
By Mark Juliano - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book tells the tale of a young marine toxicologist who discovers a sunken WWII sub chaser in the lagoon of a Pacific atoll where he is studying the local fauna. It seems the island is covered by a "taboo" in local legend that keeps people away not just from the island, but also the immediate area. While this causes some problems, the trouble really starts when the subchaser is uncovered by a typhoon that washes away much of the sandy bottom of the lagoon. There is something on the sunken subchaser that people are willing to kill for.

It is in many ways this book is classic Robb White. A young man (early 20s) on his own, sunken treasue, sailing, and a bit of WWII intrigue thrown in. Not his very best work in my opinion, but certianly enjoyable and well written. The characters are fairly well developed, and the plot consistent, with a few very nice twists. It felt a lot like "Secret Sea" in many ways, just aimed at a bit older audience.

I read many of White's books as a "pre-teen" but never read this one, as I could never find it. I ran across it at our local library, and was happily surprised how enjoyable it was reading a "new" White book as an adult. Like most Robb White books in this day and age, it will be hard to find (not as hard as some of the early ones tho), but its worth a look if you liked his other works.
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