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No Guru No Method No Teacher Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered


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Biography

One of music’s true originals Van Morrison’s unique and inspirational musical legacy is rooted in postwar Belfast.
Born in 1945 Van heard his Shipyard worker father’s collection of blues, country and gospel early in life.

Feeding off musical greats such as Hank Williams, Jimmie Rodgers, Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson and Leadbelly he was a travelling musician at 13 ... Read more in Amazon's Van Morrison Store

Visit Amazon's Van Morrison Store
for 188 albums, 15 photos, discussions, and more.

Product details

  • Audio CD (6 April 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Polydor
  • ASIN: B000009DDM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,813 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Got To Go Back
2. Oh The Warm Feeling
3. Foreign Window
4. A Town Called Paradise
5. In The Garden
6. Tir Na Nog
7. Here Comes The Knight
8. Thanks For The Information
9. One Irish Rover
10. Ivory Tower

Product Description

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Amazon.co.uk

Long-time Van Morrison fans may prefer the Belfast bard's tougher, emphatically R&B-driven work, yet it's his lusher, mid-1980s output that helped him consolidate the scrappy gains made in the prior decades. The once-heightened polarity between the earthy and the ethereal seemed muted on albums that traded in a softer-focus, romantic mysticism mirrored by the expanded scale of Morrison's band and arrangements, and left room for him to dabble in instrumental compositions or his renewed love of sax and piano. No Method, No Guru, No Teacher proves among the more durable, convincing chapters in this era, carrying a now-familiar array of symbolic touchstones (the Celtic legacy of "Tir Na Nog" or an extended instrumental allusion to a hymn set to William Blake's musings on England) and offering two of Morrison's better meditations on redemption, "In the Garden" and "A Town Called Paradise", which echoes the fevered waltz-time trance of "Astral Weeks" itself. --Sam Sutherland

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Haugh on 4 Dec. 2003
Format: Audio CD
I own nothing to compete with this album. Hypnotising from the first note it flows through each track like one continuous song. Then, with a snap of the fingers that is 'Ivory Tower' you come-to thinking you've experienced a wonderfully indulgent and very insular journey, compelling you to press <play> again just to escape back inside.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 9 Jun. 2003
Format: Audio CD
No Guru No Method No Teacher is an album of gentle ballads and meandering instrumental passages, revealing an understated mood of contentment. Got To Go Back is a mellow musing on childhood over undulating instrumentation, Oh The Warm Feeling reveals Van’s trademark spirituality and Foreign Window with its lovely female backing has a dreamy feel. The tempo picks up for the catchy song A Town Called Paradise with its gripping guitar, sax and trumpet, inspiring lyrics and exquisite arrangement. The album title comes from the lyrics of In The Garden, a song with louder and softer sections and prominent rolling piano, whilst Tir Na Nog is a gorgeous Celtic excursion with lush instrumentation and poetic lyrics. Here Comes The Night is a lilting soulful love song whilst Thanks For The Information has a jazzy edge to it and a semi-spoken vocal. One Irish Rover is closer to traditional folk, but still infused with Van’s unique sense of the mystical. On this album you won’t find Morrison’s most passionate or ecstatic moments, but rather a sense of calm and tranquility in the soothing and delectable melodies.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Jago Wells VINE VOICE on 9 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Consistantly inconsistant throughout the 70's,Van Morrison's 80's creations,were,by contrast, a purple period of beautifully constructed, brilliant 'celtic soul' albums.
'No Guru,no method,no teacher' is a stunner to be sure.From the opening roar of 'Got to go back' through the epic 'Tir na Nog' to the closing 'Ivory Tower'...the album doesn't have as much as a single 'so so' track on it.
Each song reverbrates with energy and craftmanship which demand instant appreciation....it's that good !
Possibly some of Van Morrison's greatest ever compositions are on this album.......'Foreign Window'..'In the garden' 'thanks for the information'..'One Irish Rover'....
Did Van Morrison ever make a better record than this ?.......possibly not.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Mar. 2001
Format: Audio CD
Amongst Van Morrison's records, this one does not usually get a lot of credit. However, its music is truly great and atmospheric. This record has some of the best horns arrangements I have ever heard, which make it very soulful and warm. Highly recommended!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By alextorres on 17 Feb. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Over his long career Van Morrison has produced a number of outstanding albums covering a variety of musical styles - 1986's "No Guru, no Method, no Teacher", for me, is one of those outstanding albums of his.

Lyrically, on "No Guru...", Van often explores spiritual themes from a very human perspective, drawing on a number of his experiences to comment on various threads of spiritual teaching. Not a new theme to him, of course, even back in 1986 - it works particularly well on this album because the musical arrangements are wonderfully inventive and evocative.

The band that Van has playing on this album is truly first class and the musical arrangements, tending towards jazz but not uncomfortably so, delightful. Take away Van's vocals and the music would still be wonderful to listen to unaccompanied - quite bewitching and mantric - I suppose you could say that it suits the spiritual subject matter very well.

As well as the usual instruments to be found in rock music arrangements, Van has provided for tenor and soprano saxophones, trumpet, cor anglais, oboe, harp and strings. Given the vocalisations and arrangements, it would be fair to add to this the wonderful female backing singers. The fusion of all these parts is what makes for a truly wonderful album, one of his greats. Hearing it IS a spiritual experience.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 July 2000
Format: Audio CD
No Guru, no Method, No Teacher is the most beautiful Van Morrison Album. You will agree with me after the first opening bars; it sets the tone for the whole album. For all those who champion Astral Weeks, this is Astral Weeks for the Eighties. Got to Get back sets the mood, Oh the Warm Feeling is just gorgeous, Foreign Window is haunting, Town Called Paradise is my favourite EVER Van Morrison track (did he ever write anything more passionate?), and In the Garden just carries on the mood. You will not find a more complete, perfect, flowing side to any Van Morrison Album. Side 2 is not as good except for Tir Na Nog, but side 1 makes up for it. This is my favourite Van album with Astral Weeks a close second. This era seemed to see the great man at his second peak.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "paulclarkson5" on 18 Nov. 2003
Format: Audio CD
This always was my favourite Van album after I had got into him through Astral Weeks. I consider it to be his best if only for 'In the Garden', the best Van vocal by far (not only do I think this but have heard so from countless friends who bought this album on its release as I did).
This album for me evokes such strong memories of childhood and school (I did believe in my soul 'after school'!), love and heartache and passion and life!! It has a very limp, languid sound that seems to just hang on the ear with some lovely backing vocals, horns and strings. It is here where Van extracts the raw emotion from his words and thoughts without being verbose. It stikes a chord in the listener because the result is so honest and direct despite the high production values. Listen to 'Got to go Back' and 'Town called Paradise' and you can actually see sound. Another thing also, the album, like so many great records, hangs together as a complete work - you cannot imagine the tracks being placed in any other order.
It sounds so corny now but music like this is so pure that you forget that it is being produced by technology, it just sounds so immediate. Buy it!!!
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