or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £7.27 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History (Fourth edition) [Paperback]

Stephen F. Eisenman , Thomas Crow
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: £32.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 25 Oct.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback £29.95  
Paperback, 4 July 2011 £32.00  
Trade In this Item for up to £7.27
Trade in Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History (Fourth edition) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £7.27, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

4 July 2011
Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History, hailed as one of the most engrossing and stimulating art history texts to come along for years by The Times Higher Education Supplement, embraces many aspects of the so-called new art history attention to issues of class and gender, reception and spectatorship, racism and Eurocentrism, popular and élite culture while at the same time recovering the remarkable vitality, salience and subversiveness of the eras best art. This new fourth edition includes four revised chapters together with a substantially expanded chapter on Photography, Modernity and Art. With 245 illustrations now in colour, including over a dozen brand new images, this rich and diverse volume will interest students, specialists and anyone fascinated by this dynamic period.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Between 20-26 October 2014, spend £10 in a single order on item(s) dispatched from and sold by Amazon.co.uk and receive a £2 promotional code to spend in the Amazon Appstore. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History (Fourth edition) + Art in Theory, 1815-1900: An Anthology of Changing Ideas
Price For Both: £55.39

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 500 pages
  • Publisher: Thames & Hudson; 4 edition (4 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0500289247
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500289242
  • Product Dimensions: 3.6 x 21.8 x 27.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 236,957 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Stephen F. Eisenmann teaches art history at Northwestern University. Thomas Crow is Professor of Art History at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Brian Lukacher is Associate Professor of Art History at Vassar College. Linda Nochlin is Lila Wallace Professor of Modern Art at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. David Llewellyn Phillips is Senior Lecturer in Visual Theory at the University of East London. Frances K. Pohl is Professor of Art History at Pomona College, California. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more


Customer Reviews

5 star
0
4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.0 out of 5 stars
3.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Starting with the quote from Karl Marx, authors continue to look on Nineteenth century art and Art in general from ideological point of view. From revolution to revolution, from war to war, artists are left to express the ideas and represent the images of historical events and historical figures, so art becomes secondary compare to other life experiences. There is no focus on individual artists, but rather on -isms and political tendencies. Even with the appreciation for the work authors put in writing this lengthy book, one is puzzled with the question: What was in fact their primary goal?
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Academic overview of nineteenth century art 8 Dec 2004
By Gagewyn - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a text based overview of art in the 1800's. It has a text to picture ratio similar to that in Art by Hartt. It has a similar (but obviously more specific) audience. Reproductions are high quality. Most are black and white - maybe 20 percent color. Here the color plates are mixed throughout the book, instead of all together in one color section. So all the thematically similar pictures are grouped together with the information about them. Read through the chapter titles and if you like several of the artists in question then this may be a good book to have reproductions of their work.

Outline of Nineteenth Century Art:
Classicism and Romanticism
Patriotism and Virtue: David to the Young Ingres
Classicism in Crisis: Gross to Delacroix
The Tensions of Enlightenment: Goya
Visionary History Painting: Blake and His Contemporaries
Nature Historicized: Constable, Turner, and Romantic Landscape Painting
New World Frontiers
Old World, New World: The Encounter of Cultures on the American Frontier
Black and White in America
Realism and Naturalism
The Generation of 1830 and the Crisis in the Public Sphere
The Rhetoric of Realism: Courbet and the Origin of the Avant-Garde
The Decline of History Painting: Germany, Italy, and France
Modern Art and Life
Manet and the Impressionists
Issues of Gender in Cassatt and Eakins
Mass Culture and Utopia: Seurat and Neoimpressionism
Abstraction and Populism: Van Gough
Symbolism and the Dialectics of Retreat
The Failure and Success of Cezanne
chronology, bibliography, list of illustrations and index

This is a good book for university libraries. Because realistic art styles have traditionally been overlooked in favor of more abstract styles, there is a gap in history books that cover art. This is a good detailed overview of overlooked art. The sections on American art particularly valuable in filling a potential gap. American art in this time period had a documentary function. (European art had more of an idealized function as from Ruskin or acted more in the traditional way as a status symbol. Also European movements such as Pre-Raphealitism have recently become popular and widely available, so this is not such a big gap.) Having coverage of American art from this time period is especially desirable.

I don't think that this is such a good book for individuals to buy, unless you already know what it is. It is written and intended for academic study (so the writing is dense). Look through the book at a book shop or library first.
32 of 43 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Skip it. 28 Dec 2005
By M. Dillman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I too had this book for a college 19th century art course. Most of the movements were not new to me and I dearly love most art of the period. But for anyone new to it this will be an incredibly boring read, too much bogged down in marxism and political correctness. Eisenman; a self-professed "Marxist-Art Historian" seems unable to speak of any movement without making it into classs warfare or accusing artists of being sexist or rascist, while completely ingnoring the historical context. As with many art history surveys Eisenman also suffers the delusion that there is something inherently wrong with academic art and that the only worthwhile art of the 19th century was made in France.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent book for the price 18 Sep 2007
By Happy Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I recently purchased this book A) Because it was alot cheaper than my college bookstore's price, and B) Because it was mandatory for the class I'm taking. The book covers alot of the information for the 1800s in the art world. I like to actually see the work of art when it's being discussed, so the lack of images is a little annoying.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful, fascinating history 11 Aug 2011
By Suzaan Boettger - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Eisenman draws upon the expertise of well-known scholars, most of whom who have already refined their understanding as veteran art historians and authors themselves of major histories of art, to complement his own considerable knowledge of both the artists and issues germane to conceptions of the avant-garde, modernism, and modernity. This compilation is unusual in that the authors all have deep understanding of social and economic history, power relations, and qualities of developing urbanism and apply that for penetrating illumination of the pictures. The writing, pitched for the reader with serious interest in the subject, is honed and clear, and will be revelatory, even, and especially a pleasure, for those who have a generic understanding of 19th century art from basic survey texts or museum visiting.
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for casual readers, but a amazingly easy academic read. 11 Feb 2014
By Corissa Goodrich - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Eisenman is easily one of the most accessible Academic writers I have read thus far in my college career. Yes, some of the articles in it are harder than others, but for the most part this book was well organized. Eisenman framed each chapter with an introduction that clarified and gave background for the articles that followed it. I would ignore the freshman, this was a very accessible, downright viceral (for academic work) read.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback