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Nikon 300 mm / F 2,8 G ED VR II Lens

by Nikon

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
  • Mount Type Nikon F-Bayonet
  • Focal Length 300mm
  • Maximum Aperture 2.8
  • Minimum Aperture 22
  • Angle of View 8 10' (5 20' with Nikon DX-format)

Product details

  • Product Dimensions: 51 x 28 x 28 cm ; 2.9 Kg
  • Boxed-product Weight: 6 Kg
  • Delivery Destinations: Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
    Find out more about our Delivery Rates and Returns Policy
  • Item model number: 2186
  • ASIN: B0030BEVEW
  • Date first available at Amazon.co.uk: 1 Jan 2001
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Nikon AF-S 2,8/300 G ED VR II

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Justice Peace on 20 Sep 2011
I got mine from WE. Pity Amazon does not stock these because they are the business. If you want a perfect image mount one of these on a sturdy tripod with a gimbal head (you'll need it because it's 2 kilos) put it on timer and use a remote. You'll get astonishing results: as sharp as very sharp thing indeed. Of course it's really a 'sports action' lens because you can shoot at very fast shutter speeds and freeze moving targets. I took one of some guy zipping past me on a moped. He is totally 'frozen' and you can see his eyes looking sideways at me suspiciously. I might post a photo for reference. It can be tricky to mount on the D3 because of the weight but that'll be the same for all big Nikkor lenses. JP.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. L. Telford on 5 Jun 2013
Please see the attached graphs. I used LensAlign and FocusTune to test the Nikkor 300mm f2.8G ED VRII lens, Serial Number L 209819. The lens was mounted on an Arca-Swiss Z1G (giant) monoball and Gitzo 5000 series carbon-fiber legs, at a height of 107cm. The ISO was 1600 and the shutter speed was 1/320. The lens-to-target distance was 8 meters and I used a shutter release cable. The camera body was a Nikon D4 that last week came back from Nikon after being adjusted for a back-focusing issue. For an overview of the lens AF performance, I took 4 shots at each micro-adjustment value from minus 20 to plus 20 in steps of 5 units. Based on this overview test and to look for a peak in the curve, I took 9 shots at each micro-adjustment value from plus 10 to plus 20 in steps of 2 units. As you can see both curves go up from left to right, but do not come down. Jeepers, there is no peak. Conclusion, this high-priced lens is focusing in front of the target by greater than 20 micro-adjustment units.

If this was my first such experience, I would not be so appalled.
Sad to say, that last month I tested a new Nikkor 85mm 1.8D lens, only to find that it was focusing behind the target by greater than minus 20 micro-adjustment units.

Caveat emptor; or do you think that we pro photographers can still trust Nikon's Quality Control?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
56 of 56 people found the following review helpful
Exceeded my expectations 24 May 2011
By Ian Nicholson - Published on Amazon.com
This is a much praised and incredibly expensive lens. For the big money I was dropping, I was expecting quality and boy did Nikon deliver - and then some. It is impossible to exaggerate how stunningly sharp this lens is. I use the lens to shoot song birds - some of which are very small indeed. The fine feather detail that this lens renders is simply amazing.

As stunningly sharp as the lens is at 300mm, I have been pleasantly surprised by its performance with teleconverters. I have the Nikon 1.4 and the 1.7 teleconverters. I was expecting to see a fall off in performance, especially with the 1.7 but no - performance is outstanding, especially when stopped down a bit. I regularly use my 300 2.8 with the 1.7 which gives me a razor sharp 510mm lens. I am very happy with this combination and despite the big price tag I have no regrets at all. I haven't tried the new 2.0 teleconverter but I hear that the 300 2.8 does well with that too.

One other great feature about this lens is its size and weight. It is a bit of a brute if you are used to light, consumer grade lenses like the 70-300VR (which is a great lens for the money). However, if you are more accustomed to big glass like a 500 or 600mm f4, then the 300 2.8 with a teleconverter is a nice small package. It is much smaller and lighter than either of those big lenses and it can be handheld while those other two cannot. I regularly carry this lens with me all afternoon without any problem. In my opinion it is the best combination of size, weight, reach and quality of any of Nikon's super teles. I say that as someone who owns a 600mm f4. I love my 600 and I would never part with it, but it is a monster that demands a big tripod and a gimbal head. The 300 2.8 + teleconverter is a much more convenient, hand-holdable package and it gives nearly the same quality as the 600mm.

Yeah I know - the 300 2.8 costs a fortune, but if you need reach and can possibly afford it you should go for it. I guarantee you will not be disappointed.
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
An astounding piece of glass 4 Jan 2011
By Richard Lewington - Published on Amazon.com
Summary:
Get one. The new car/house etc. can wait.

Pros:
Just about the sharpest lens I own.
VR system works really well and settles fast - about half-a-second. I've taken sharp hand-held shots at 1/60s, which ought to be impossible.
Remarkable focusing speed.
Surprisingly wieldy - I use this hand-held a lot, for aviation and nature photography. I'm not particularly strong.
Well balanced on a D300. I suspect a D3 would be even better.
Value - yes, 5 grand is a lot of money for a lens, but the results justify the outlay.

Cons:
Bit of a learning curve. You do really need to use it for a while and learn what all the various buttons and sliders do before you'll get stellar results.

I traded in a Sigma 150-500mm for this. The Sigma is also great value (and vastly cheaper), but just not sharp enough and the VR system takes about 5 seconds to settle, by which time the shot is often lost. The Sigma also seemed to stress the camera's battery more.

One minor modification was to replace the stock foot with an Arca-Swiss compatible one (Kirk LP-46). It's a bit stiffer and makes moving from hand-held to monopod to tripod very convenient.
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
It is a superb lens, So I will focus on my experience with it and it's features 28 Nov 2012
By Mike - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This lens is top quality , Sharp, and durable. It is probably the best 300mm f2.8 lens money can buy today.
I will not get in to the Technical discussion of this lens, since it would take a university's optical department to give you a meaningful assessment of the optical quality and sharpness.
So the best I can do here is my experience with the lens and here it is.

First of all the Quality, fit and fish and performance is first rate.
This lens is lighter and smaller than the specs suggest. this was a very pleasant surprise to me.
The VRII is very effective and much quieter than the 200-400mm f4.
The Auto focus is very fast, and like other recent Nikon top of the line tele lenses it has its own Auto focus buttons that can be programed as, AF On, AF lock, or Focus distance Memory/recall.
I am still finding new ways to use the recall button. very handy in places that has a lot of clutter that could distract the Auto focus system.

The lens is compact compare to other Nikon exotic telephotos. I cary the lens attached to a full size DSLR in a 15 L small backpack along with TC 20 and TC14 and other accessories during back country shootings. Speaking of TC 20 and TC14, the lens was designed and lunched with TC 20 III and they are a perfect match for each other. I can can get a 600 f5.6 that I can cary at 10000 feet while hiking and looking for Mountain goats.
I have tested both TC's with this lens and the results is much better than my expectation for such a setup. Do I lose sharpness? I am sure I do but I can not tell unless I pixel peep real hard.
It can be hand held very effectively for a while (VRii is very helpful) but it wears on you eventually, my setup for this lens in the back country is a monopod and a ProMedia Gear Tomahawk directly attached to the monopod. I use a RRS BH 55 ball-head and a Tripod other wise.

If you are debating between this lens and 200-400mm f4, I use both and in my opinion, you will be happier with 200-400mm f4, just my opinion, But based on the fact that you are debating it in your head it tells me you do not have a specific need for this lens and you just want a good quality lens in this range and if that is so, then you really want 200-400mm f4. It is about a $1000 more, but more versatile and well worth the additional investment, but the 200-400 is 4" longer and 1lb heavier.

Some things to think about since it may cost you more money
( even though if you are going to buy this lens you already made arrangement for a second mortgage or you are a .com baby)

The strap is the cheesy Nikon strap that comes with $500 cameras, so plan on buying a good one worthy of carrying a heavy and expensive lens. I use a Black Rapids sports2 strap attached via a Arca-Swiss style clamp to the RRS replacement foot, scary looking but functional.

The supplied foot is of a high quality but a bit short and uncomfortable to use during hand carrying. If you are using Arca-Swiss style heads the best is to get a replacement foot that is longer and can be balanced on the head better specially if you go back and forth with different size cameras attached to the lens. I use RRS LCF-14 replacement foot, it is very comfortable when I cary the lens and camera together. This option is not much more expensive than buying a Arca-Swiss plate and is more elegant and lighter weight solution.

I also got the Lenscoat for this lens for added protection and eventual help with the resale value.

Lastly, The hood supplied with this lens is really more for packing and transporting than it is for every day use. it is too big and clumsy to get off and put on, I use the hoody from Lenscoat (XXL size) but others make similar ones. these hoods are very functional and practical to use.

In conclusion, Sharp, high quality, expensive, and once you get over the price shock it is the most fun you will have with your camera,

Hope this helps.
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Superb lens 26 Dec 2010
By Steven V. Christensen - Published on Amazon.com
I've used this lens for a week and it exceeds all my expectations. Although it's heavy I'm still able to handhold it while photographing birds in flight. All I can say is I wish I had made this investment years ago. See the results here:
[...]
Steve Christensen
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Very Sharp and Surprisingly Light 1 Mar 2012
By James M. Worthington - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I bought this lens as part of a switch from Canon to Nikon. It performs superbly - fast autofocus, exceptionally sharp images, and easy to handle. With the Canon system, I had a 400 mm f/2.8. While a great lens, it was too heavy to hand hold, so I always used it on a monopod or tripod. The Nikon 300 is much lighter. I can hand hold it for short periods. This makes it useful to me in shooting basketball at the far end of the court as well as grabbing shots of coaches and players off the court. I've also combined it with the 1.7X teleconverter to photograph birds. It is still quite sharp, even with the teleconverter.
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