Nikolski and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Ships from the UK within 24 hours. Your purchase supports authors through the Book Author Resale Right. Number of pages: 272.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Nikolski Paperback – 1 Jan 2009

34 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Jan 2009
£3.49 £0.01
Available from these sellers.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Portobello Books Ltd (1 Jan. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846271657
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846271656
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.8 x 20.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,500,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Dickner excites the imagination of the reader to the point of ecstasy' - Le Monde
-- Review

'Stylish, offbeat, poignant, and perceptive' - David Mitchell -- Review

Review

'Dickner excites the imagination of the reader to the point of ecstasy' - Le Monde

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MisterKeith VINE VOICE on 8 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
OK, so I got this because it had a quote from David Mitchell on the cover. And, yes, you should never read a book because of a quote on the cover - context etc.

That said, I'm so glad that I did. Every so often, I watch one of those "arty" films where nothing ever happens - "Lantana" springs to mind - and I tend to come out wishing I'd gone to see Chuck Norris kicking the living daylights out of someone instead. This book is the literary equivalent of one of those films: there's no "action", there's not much in the way of plot, no-one dies. The major difference between, say, "Lantana" and "Nikolski" is that none of this matters. What this story is absolutely packed with is characters and character development, and it's a treat from start to finish. The writing is often beautiful, and the characters, whilst quirky, never cross the line into irritating.

The ending may annoy some readers, as it leaves several loose ends untied but I'm actually glad that it does, since you can apply your own interpretation.

In the last few months, I've read detective novels, autobiographies, murder mysteries and musical biographies (amongst others): no one book gripped me and made me want to carry on reading like "Nikolski" did.

A rare pleasure.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Every character in this light comedy-satire seems to be fishing for something, although not necessarily fish or even in water. Yet, most places where the action takes place are somehow located on islands: Montreal Island, Stevenson Island, and an island off the Venezuelan coast. Finally, and not to be overlooked the "magnetic north" and the title of the novel, Nikolski, a village one of the small Aleutian islands off Alaska. Sounds a bit like a mystery story? In a way, yes, as first time Quebec novelist Nicolas Dickner spins a delightful yarn around his three primary characters, either moving to or through and/or living in Montreal until...

Noah, who, until he was eighteen, lived with his mother a nomadic life in a trailer, crisscrossing the western regions of Canada, arrives in Montreal to study archaeology and discovers the "archaeology of trash" as an intriguing topic, "trash being the artifacts of civilization" and much "fishing" is involved. Joyce, from a long line of Doucettes of dubious reputation in Atlantic Canada, pursues her ambitions to live up to the family's tradition and to become a modern-day pirate. She also goes on fishing expeditions, but of a different kind: she scrounges through industry trash to find all the bits needed to get a workable computer built and much more... Finally, a first person narrator of a kind, who runs a second-hand bookshop also has some fishing to do...

Do these characters link together in some way? Are the connections stronger than strangers meeting in the night? It is for the reader to find out. The author introduces some secondary characters, charming in their own way, who may have to offer some clues or provide connections.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By sarahalliez VINE VOICE on 7 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As a fan of quirky witty books and the TV series Northern Exposure, I greatly enjoyed this well crafted tale of 3 people connected to the Alaskan / Aluetian Island town Nikolski. The un-named narrator works in a secondhand bookshop in Montreal and owns a compass which is the only item left from his father's life. It points to Nikolski, a small place in Alaska, the last known place where his father lived. Noah may share the same father, Joyce is related to Noah's father and according to tales told by her grandpa, who lives in a rickety house on the outskirts of her village, has pirate ancestors. Noah and Joyce end up in a Montreal fish shop where Joyce works and Noah lives, although they never meet there. Their lives also intertwine with the narrator, mainly because of a mysterious book about pirates which started life at Liverpool University and has travelled around the world. As a bookcrosser, I was particularly tickled by the important part this book plays in the story. The book is gracefully translated and the narrative flows beautifully. It is also beautifully produced, with pictures of fish as chapter headings. I found this book a pleasure to look at and read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a strange little book, and that seems to sell lately. Normally, if I was to write of a book that it is vague, has a tendency to wander all the over the place and, having eventually reached the end, resolves nothing much, this would be a bad thing. In Nikolski, it works, and it works quite well. The stories of the three main characters of the book are told in alternating chapters ... and they never quite meet up.

That's the thing with Nikolski.

Three different stories are told, linked together by the mysterious figure of Jonas Doucet, and, while the stories do intersect briefly as the characters bump into each other near the end, the stories never join and the characters merely carry on with their own lives, and their own separate narratives.

That is one of the charms of Nikolski: it's unusualness, the sense that you are reading something quite new and fresh, but it's also one of its weaknesses: the end is rather anti-climactic. No, that is wrong: there is never any sense in Nikolski of even approaching a climax, a resolution, and that's a shame for a book that's otherwise as good as Nikolski.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback