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Night Paperback – Special Edition, 1 Jan 1920


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Paperback, Special Edition, 1 Jan 1920
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Product details

  • Paperback: 109 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam USA; 25th Anniversary edition edition (1 Jan 1920)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553272535
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553272536
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 1.3 x 17 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 469,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Edward Tem on 27 Feb 2005
Format: Hardcover
This personal account of the holocaust by Elie Wiesel's book is a horrifying story of the Nazi death camps. The author tells the story in a simple manner, yet it is easy for a reader to end up feeling haunted by the accounts in "Night". It stirs sadness and profound questions in the bosom of a reader. The lessons from this book about the evil side of fallen human nature and the faith, courage and moral strength to fight the evil must never be forgotten. I recommend this book to any reader interested in the holocaust and the specter of mass killings plaguing the world today.
Also recommended are: SURVIVAL IN AUSCHWITZ, DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By maya j on 31 July 2007
Format: Hardcover
`Night' is a poignant, evocative story of a young Elie Wiesel and his father and their experiences in a number of concentration camps during WWII. The translation from French is done beautifully, as it is written in a plain, straightforward manner, and it reads with an eloquence and softness that belies the subject matter. As you read `Night', you find yourself cringing, eyes wide with horror, and it gives you a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach to know that innocent human beings were subjected to physical and emotional pain beyond belief. It is not graphic in the sense that there is too much information, it tells, in its simplicity, the truth of what one person experienced at one time, on this earth. Sixty years later, we believe what history has shown us of these atrocities, yet do we understand? In `Night', Elie Wiesel attempts to make us understand. He talks about Death with a capital "D" and "The Selection" of people for slaughter. His sadness and despair during his incarceration, as well as his alarming indifference to certain things in the name of survival, permeate each page. Finally, we realize that this book is written as a tribute to his father and his father's beliefs that "Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented" and keep the memory alive, "Because if we forget, we are guilty, we are accomplices". So Elie Wiesel will not stay silent, and we must never forget.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lincs Reader TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Jan 2009
Format: Paperback
Night is often read in American HIgh School and is translated excellently from it's original French language

It is an autobiographical description of his experience from the time he was evacuated from his home in Czechoslovakia until he was liberated by the Allies from Buchenwald. He describes the process of evacuation, the trip by train to the concentration camp, his experiences immediately upon arriving at the camp, his experiences for the next year whilst in the camp.

Wiesel is an excellent writer and uses language so simply yet very effectively. There is so much horrific detail in this very short book, and his understanding of himself, and his peers in the concentration camp is outstanding.

This is only a short book of just over 100 pages but I was only able to read it in very short bursts as the detail and horror is immense. This is a magnificently written account of a time in history that is so hard for most of us to face up to.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
"Night" is Elie Wiesel's account of his time with the Nazis, from seeing them arrive in his small town in Hungary to being liberated from a concentration camp, standing in front of a mirror wondering who the person looking back at him is.

The beginning of the book is fascinating as most people at the time didn't believe the Nazis were out to get them all. This is 1943. One of the townsfolk is taken by the Nazis yet escapes and makes it back to the town with horror stories of the camps yet nobody wants to believe him so he is ignored. The Jews throughout are always saying to themselves that things will get better, God will protect them, the Allies are coming, and crushingly at every turn they are proved wrong. It's that feeling of hope that's so devastating to read about, the reader knowing what's coming to them all.

Elie and his family are taken and sent to Auschwitz. He's separated from his mother and sisters but is happy to be with his father. He never sees his mother or sisters again.

The camps are punishing. Hard work coupled with little to no food yet somehow he survives. In one strange scene, his father and himself along with 98 others are moved from one camp to another. While working in a factory he sees a Polish officer working for the Nazis with a Polish girl at the back of a factory - he realises the Polish officer has moved 100 prisoners just to be with the girl. Elie laughs at this and the officer sees him. Elie is punished by being whipped 25 times. The juxtaposition of love and hate in one scene is powerful.

Strange moments like that fill the slim volume - 115 pages - such as during an air raid, a cauldron of soup is unattended in the middle of a yard.
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By Alene on 21 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Its gripping, shatteringly painful but im so sorry to say (i hope i dont sound insensitive) it drags on after a while. But a very good insight to what happened back then.
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