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News from No Man's Land Audio Cassette – Audiobook, 20 Sep 2002


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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio Books (20 Sept. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333989953
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333989951
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.7 x 13.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,188,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

The third volume of autobiography from the fearless foreign correspondent and bestselling author of Strange Places, Questionable People and A Mad World, My Masters. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The third bestselling volume of memoirs from John Simpson. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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3.7 out of 5 stars
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 7 Nov. 2002
Format: Hardcover
John Simpsons third autobiography takes the reader to the devastating warzone of Afghanistan. This book is the tale of Simpson's and therefore the BBC's entrance into war torn Kabul. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the way that John Simpson alternated chapters on his journey to Afghanistan with chapters on the presentation of the media world today. I admire the hard job that he has as a foreign correspondent and the team that surrounds him. John simpson is careful to praise those around him and highlights very clearly his job is more than a one man show. I appreciate the way he has shown the reader all the "tricks of the trade" and why things are they way they are in media. John Simpson also draws on his other two books developing the idea of the adventures he has had from the second volume to the development of the media and his position within in it from his first volume. These books are real adventures that contain a very thorough look at the media and the attitudes of todays society towards it, although Simpson works for the BBC he takes a very neutral view towards it and gives praise when it is due-in my opinion the BBC deserves a fair amount!. I would recommend any of his books for anyone who wants to understand the media world, enjoys adventures and thoroughly good writing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Ringrose on 22 Feb. 2004
Format: Paperback
Interesting, compelling and humorous. John Simpson writes about life as a foreign war correspondent for the BBC, centred around the story of his reporting in Afghanistan from August through November 2001. But it's about more than events in Afghanistan...
John Simpson draws on thirty odd years of experience at the BBC, where he began in the 1960s and worked with veteran journalists of the time. He describes the many changes in the way news is reported and gathered, and indeed, in the change in our expectations of news reporting.
In particular, I found the discussion of the logistics of news gathering intriguing, and it has made me view television news reports in a different light.
I like the way John Simpson explains some of his frustrations when trying to get a short, interesting piece back to the BBC in London. The effort involved is really quite staggering, when you consider that the result is a report on an evening news programme which lasts from just 60 to 120 seconds.
My favourite anecdote in the book is where he describes the TV crew's attempt to cross the Amudarya river (the river formerly known as the Oxus). "Your ship", indicates one of the Afghan guides. 'But our ship wasn't a ship... All it was, was four large tractor tyres bound together with rope and supporting a wooden frame which was covered with straw.'
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Michelle Massah on 18 Nov. 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is the fifth book I have read of John Simpson's. All his books - and this is no exception - are articulate and extremely interesting insights into his working life as a journalist. This particular book deals with his famous 'walk into Kabul', John Simpson teases us by telling us the story in small segments during the book, whilst also discussing his very personal opinions on journalism, the BBC as well as many anecdotes. One thing I enjoy about his books is the way he talks about his own arrogance, pig-headedness, determination to get to the true story with such unusual honesty. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to be better informed about the wicked ways of the world. Amazingly, Mr Simpson keeps you entertained whilst educating you. He has such tremendous experiences as a journalist it would have been a waste not to put pen to paper.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. A. Paton on 20 Sept. 2006
Format: Paperback
Typical John Simpson. I know that he writes about the BBC a lot, but that's not really surprising as he's worked for Aunty most of his professional career. His writing style may be very conversational, but that adds to his books' personal, almost intimate, approach. As much as anything else, it's particularly nice for a journalist to take a swipe at his own, often pompous and self-congratulatory, profession.
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Format: Paperback
This is by far my favourite John Simpson book, and I've read them all now. He uses the various things that happen to him during the Afghan war to not only inform about this, but as a springboard to talk about other subjects, sometimes past exploits sometimes issues he considers important, such as teamwork and the various people who put up with him.Personally, I find this book inspiring because of the accounts about the other people he works with, professionals or locals. All of this is told in a friendly almost conversational style which makes it easy to read and connect with, a great feat given I have never been in war torn country. He is self deprecating and often tells his tales with humour, although I would not like to be between him and a story as he comes across as quite ruthless at times (necessary in his profession I suppose).

Most of the people who did not enjoy this book were concerned about the frequent mentions of the BBC. It is true that there are many mentions, not always positive. This seems reasonable to me given that he has worked most of his life for them. I liked all the beeb talk as it gave some interesting insights and a side of the long standing debate that I have not previously heard, but I can understand that it would irritate others. Perhaps the problem is that this book is not exactly autobiography, like a couple of his others, but nor is it a straightforward text on the Afghan war. Essentially this book is a loose collection personal reflections and opinions bound together by the over arcing narrative of his experience of the Afghan war.
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