New Young Pony Club

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At a Glance

Formed: 2004 (11 years ago)


Biography

Forget everything you thought you knew about New Young Pony Club, because on their second album it's all changed.

If 2007's critically acclaimed, Mercury Music Prize nominated 'Fantastic Playroom' was the culmination of the hybrid disco sound they pioneered, 'The Optimist' heralds the beginning of a brave new future for the band.

From the moment the band released their debut 7" in 2005, their unique blending of dark disco, pop punk and anthemic new wave found itself swept up in the cult of 'New Rave'. Despite the fact NYPC quickly became one of the key figures in the movement, something ... Read more

Forget everything you thought you knew about New Young Pony Club, because on their second album it's all changed.

If 2007's critically acclaimed, Mercury Music Prize nominated 'Fantastic Playroom' was the culmination of the hybrid disco sound they pioneered, 'The Optimist' heralds the beginning of a brave new future for the band.

From the moment the band released their debut 7" in 2005, their unique blending of dark disco, pop punk and anthemic new wave found itself swept up in the cult of 'New Rave'. Despite the fact NYPC quickly became one of the key figures in the movement, something was amiss. "We realised that actually we're outsiders," admits singer Ty Bulmer. "'Disco Punk' came to this country from the fringes of New York and it felt like an outsiders scene. We were so passionate about it, but soon it became glossy and banal. We stepped back and thought 'We don't want to be part of this world'."

So the creative nucleus of Ty and Andy Spence moved away from the flashing lights of LDN and instead looked inside themselves to locate their next step."I do remember making certain guidelines for this album like: no four on the floor, no cowbell and vocally no 'sexy talk' or monotone vocal," jokes Andy. But musically they were boldly venturing into uncharted territory. The turning point came with the album's title track; a swarthy, deliciously menacing number that pushed the band completely out of their comfort zone.
"It was a key moment that took us by surprise," says Andy. "It was one of the first instances where we abandoned what had come before. Ty came in with the vocals and bass line. I played it on a guitar that we'd never used before and it created this whole new extreme and strange sound. But we were so pleased with the results." This new lease of creative freedom opened the band up to explore more experimental sides of themselves; like the psychedelic balladry of 'Stone' and atmospheric, cracked beauty of 'The Architect'.

Lyrically too, the glamorous themes dealt with on 'Fantastic Playroom' were left behind. "The last album was about a particular persona," says Ty. "And it was my sexy, party animal, idealised self. Sometimes I am that person, but in the wake of a 10 year relationship ending I felt it was important to be a bit more honest." So the album 'The Optimist' delves into psychological black holes with brutal clarity. "The last album had an intellectual depth but not an emotional one," she adds. "I played it to my friend and he said 'it makes the first sound like a bunch of nursery rhymes'!" Indeed the new album captures the band at their most extreme. There they are fame-fatigued ('Dolls'), hopeful on the tightrope of despair ('Monochrome') and gleefully moving on ('Lost A Girl').

Self produced and more importantly self funded and self released, 'The Optimist' is the sound of a band taking full control of their present and future, circumnavigating their own way .

It's an assured, deliciously adventurous next step for New Young Pony Club. Open your ears and have a listen.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Forget everything you thought you knew about New Young Pony Club, because on their second album it's all changed.

If 2007's critically acclaimed, Mercury Music Prize nominated 'Fantastic Playroom' was the culmination of the hybrid disco sound they pioneered, 'The Optimist' heralds the beginning of a brave new future for the band.

From the moment the band released their debut 7" in 2005, their unique blending of dark disco, pop punk and anthemic new wave found itself swept up in the cult of 'New Rave'. Despite the fact NYPC quickly became one of the key figures in the movement, something was amiss. "We realised that actually we're outsiders," admits singer Ty Bulmer. "'Disco Punk' came to this country from the fringes of New York and it felt like an outsiders scene. We were so passionate about it, but soon it became glossy and banal. We stepped back and thought 'We don't want to be part of this world'."

So the creative nucleus of Ty and Andy Spence moved away from the flashing lights of LDN and instead looked inside themselves to locate their next step."I do remember making certain guidelines for this album like: no four on the floor, no cowbell and vocally no 'sexy talk' or monotone vocal," jokes Andy. But musically they were boldly venturing into uncharted territory. The turning point came with the album's title track; a swarthy, deliciously menacing number that pushed the band completely out of their comfort zone.
"It was a key moment that took us by surprise," says Andy. "It was one of the first instances where we abandoned what had come before. Ty came in with the vocals and bass line. I played it on a guitar that we'd never used before and it created this whole new extreme and strange sound. But we were so pleased with the results." This new lease of creative freedom opened the band up to explore more experimental sides of themselves; like the psychedelic balladry of 'Stone' and atmospheric, cracked beauty of 'The Architect'.

Lyrically too, the glamorous themes dealt with on 'Fantastic Playroom' were left behind. "The last album was about a particular persona," says Ty. "And it was my sexy, party animal, idealised self. Sometimes I am that person, but in the wake of a 10 year relationship ending I felt it was important to be a bit more honest." So the album 'The Optimist' delves into psychological black holes with brutal clarity. "The last album had an intellectual depth but not an emotional one," she adds. "I played it to my friend and he said 'it makes the first sound like a bunch of nursery rhymes'!" Indeed the new album captures the band at their most extreme. There they are fame-fatigued ('Dolls'), hopeful on the tightrope of despair ('Monochrome') and gleefully moving on ('Lost A Girl').

Self produced and more importantly self funded and self released, 'The Optimist' is the sound of a band taking full control of their present and future, circumnavigating their own way .

It's an assured, deliciously adventurous next step for New Young Pony Club. Open your ears and have a listen.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Forget everything you thought you knew about New Young Pony Club, because on their second album it's all changed.

If 2007's critically acclaimed, Mercury Music Prize nominated 'Fantastic Playroom' was the culmination of the hybrid disco sound they pioneered, 'The Optimist' heralds the beginning of a brave new future for the band.

From the moment the band released their debut 7" in 2005, their unique blending of dark disco, pop punk and anthemic new wave found itself swept up in the cult of 'New Rave'. Despite the fact NYPC quickly became one of the key figures in the movement, something was amiss. "We realised that actually we're outsiders," admits singer Ty Bulmer. "'Disco Punk' came to this country from the fringes of New York and it felt like an outsiders scene. We were so passionate about it, but soon it became glossy and banal. We stepped back and thought 'We don't want to be part of this world'."

So the creative nucleus of Ty and Andy Spence moved away from the flashing lights of LDN and instead looked inside themselves to locate their next step."I do remember making certain guidelines for this album like: no four on the floor, no cowbell and vocally no 'sexy talk' or monotone vocal," jokes Andy. But musically they were boldly venturing into uncharted territory. The turning point came with the album's title track; a swarthy, deliciously menacing number that pushed the band completely out of their comfort zone.
"It was a key moment that took us by surprise," says Andy. "It was one of the first instances where we abandoned what had come before. Ty came in with the vocals and bass line. I played it on a guitar that we'd never used before and it created this whole new extreme and strange sound. But we were so pleased with the results." This new lease of creative freedom opened the band up to explore more experimental sides of themselves; like the psychedelic balladry of 'Stone' and atmospheric, cracked beauty of 'The Architect'.

Lyrically too, the glamorous themes dealt with on 'Fantastic Playroom' were left behind. "The last album was about a particular persona," says Ty. "And it was my sexy, party animal, idealised self. Sometimes I am that person, but in the wake of a 10 year relationship ending I felt it was important to be a bit more honest." So the album 'The Optimist' delves into psychological black holes with brutal clarity. "The last album had an intellectual depth but not an emotional one," she adds. "I played it to my friend and he said 'it makes the first sound like a bunch of nursery rhymes'!" Indeed the new album captures the band at their most extreme. There they are fame-fatigued ('Dolls'), hopeful on the tightrope of despair ('Monochrome') and gleefully moving on ('Lost A Girl').

Self produced and more importantly self funded and self released, 'The Optimist' is the sound of a band taking full control of their present and future, circumnavigating their own way .

It's an assured, deliciously adventurous next step for New Young Pony Club. Open your ears and have a listen.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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