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on 4 March 2003
Few read poetry for pleasure due to the work involved. If you did poetry at school you were told about symbolism and how you have to read a poem to death to truly understand (and therefore appreciate) it.
This particular volume does not always require such an effort, for the poems are refreshingly clear as to their meanings. They are never less than clever yet they have been written with a view to being read, not worshipped. There is symbolism if you want to look for it, but there is never less than a good poem on the surface each time.
These three poets were first united under one volume in the sixties and were known as part of the explosion of culture from Liverpool at the time. They are individually excellent, yet when brought together for comparison they read even better than on their own. Adrian Henry has an almost innocent tone to his work, similar to a jilted teenager trying to make sense of his emotions. Roger McGough, the most famous of the three, writes with a confidence and verve of a poet who knows his trade. He is witty and writes with a younger audience in mind without ever patronising them. Finally, Brian Patten is the Darker side of the three. His work is powerful and distrubing, yet readable nonetheless.
After reading New Volume I understood what T.S.Elliot meant when he said that he used to enjoy reading French poetry before he understood French. I enjoyed this collection thoroughly on first examination, because I did not have to think beyond what I read. It is this that leads me to recommend it to all who enjoy reading, as the closer examination for meaning is left optional, the fact that they are good poems comes first each time.
0Comment|10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 March 2003
Few read poetry for pleasure due to the work involved. If you did poetry at school you were told about symbolism and how you have to read a poem to death to truly understand (and therefore appreciate) it.
This particular volume does not always require such an effort, for the poems are refreshingly clear as to their meanings. They are never less than clever yet they have been written with a view to being read, not worshipped. There is symbolism if you want to look for it, but there is never less than a good poem on the surface each time.
These three poets were first united under one volume in the sixties and were known as part of the explosion of culture from Liverpool at the time. They are individually excellent, yet when brought together for comparison they read even better than on their own. Adrian Henry has an almost innocent tone to his work, similar to a jilted teenager trying to make sense of his emotions. Roger McGough, the most famous of the three, writes with a confidence and verve of a poet who knows his trade. He is witty and writes with a younger audience in mind without ever patronising them. Finally, Brian Patten is the Darker side of the three. His work is powerful and distrubing, yet readable nonetheless.
After reading New Volume I understood what T.S.Elliot meant when he said that he used to enjoy reading French poetry before he understood French. I enjoyed this collection thoroughly on first examination, because I did not have to think beyond what I read. It is this that leads me to recommend it to all who enjoy reading, as the closer examination for meaning is left optional, the fact that they are good poems comes first each time.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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