New Stars For Old: Stories from the History of Astronomy and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
New Stars for Old: Storie... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by ACE_BOOKS
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: VERY GOOD OVERALL CONDITION --- GUARANTEED IN STOCK --- ELIGIBLE FOR AMAZONS FREE SUPERSAVER / PRIME DELIVERY ---
Trade in your item
Get a £3.11
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

New Stars for Old: Stories from the History of Astronomy Hardcover – 9 Jul 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.00
£6.00 £8.15
£18.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £3.11
Trade in New Stars for Old: Stories from the History of Astronomy for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.11, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Candy Jar Books (9 July 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0957154860
  • ISBN-13: 978-0957154865
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 2.4 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 961,223 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Marc lives with his wife and children in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, where he teaches philosophy and physics at the city's Royal Grammar School. Hobbies include reading plays and poetry, taking his motorbike out for tours of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, and watching lots of old movies.

Product Description

Review

"Entertaining and briskly written, this is a jolly good read for anyone interested in the early history of astronomy." - Astronomy Now Magazine;"New Stars For Old tells this story very well and brings history to life in an entertaining and informative way." - BBC Sky At Night Magazine (Book of the Month);"The writing style is entertaining and engaging, weaving tales of accomplishment with those of personal hardship ... readers will both enjoy the book as well as learning of the history of astronomy in the process." - All About Space Magazine

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By milknosugar on 20 July 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is brilliant! This series of stories about characters from the history of astronomy takes us from place to place, time to time, with different voices each telling their own story - all linked by the history of man's attempts to understand our place in the heavens.

The basic ideas discussed by each character are clearly explained and easy to follow. However the book is not really "about" the scientific theories themselves - there are no equations or diagrams. It is more about questions such as: What did these characters see the theories as representing - a real description of how the heavens work, or a convenient formula for predicting the movements of the planets? How did the theories fit in (or not) with philosophical and religious ideas at the time? How did the characters reconcile the problems or flaws in the theories? And how did they decide whether a theory was right or wrong? Often these questions have surprising answers!

Each character in the sequence is seen in the context of the society they are living in. The pressures and concerns of their time, and the limitations of the available technology, all influence the ways the characters present their ideas to the world and what happens to them. All the characters featured have fascinating stories to tell and their situations are vividly drawn. Some characters are very likeable and others not! The writing style is clear, direct and free of pseudo-archaisms, so the voices seem to speak to us as if sitting in the same room. Each story is followed by a brief commentary from a modern perspective and this helps draw everything together into a coherent whole.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ron Vaux on 10 April 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Such a joy! Taking a fascinating topic, astronomy's difficult and twisting history, and sprinkling it with his idiosyncratic stardust, our good Doctor MBAR has wrought a concoction of charm, wit and imagination. All is cut through with a profound wisdom, worn lightly but so convincingly. His goal: sharing with us his grasp of how that infra-ordinary stuff of daily humanity flows on throughout man's aspirations toward a truly cosmological vision. A triumph - for a first book, too - and, importantly, an affirmation of all that is good in human liff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elliott Park on 2 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover
It must be made clear at the outset of this review that I know very little of astronomy. For all I know, the universe could (as Bernard says in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia) be expanding, be contracting, or standing on one leg whilst singing `When Father Painted the Parlour'. If there are scientific inaccuracies in this book, fundamental or trivial, they passed me by, and even if they didn't, I wouldn't consider it my place to point them out.

So it was that with some trepidation, but an overriding sense of inquisitiveness that I beheld the glossy, golden cover of New Stars for Old; its title emblazoned in invitingly funky lettering, subtle photographs of heavenly bodies seeming to promise a reading experience of interstellar magnificence.

The book takes the form of twenty chapters dealing with debates, scandals, and the general confusion surrounding the history of astronomy up to and including Sir Isaac Newton. Each chapter is divided into two sections. In the first, Read the Historical Raconteur portrays the episode in question through imagined letters, diary entires, or straight prose, the characters leaping off the page such that, as the book goes on, it becomes frighteningly easy to forget that you're not actually reading a colloquial translation of one of Roberto Bellarmino's confidential letters to the Pope regarding the heretical theorising of various astronomers. In the second, Read the Scientist takes a step back from the imagined action, and outlines what is lifted directly from historical sources, what is unabashed fantasy, and what is a careful mixture of the two. He then often goes on to briefly discuss some of the issues arising from the episode, many of which are touched upon in later sections.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Janette Skinner on 6 July 2013
Format: Hardcover
This book was given to me by the writer to read and review. I found it original and very interesting. I enjoyed the feeling of the mixture of the factual sections and the fiction. Then, helpfully there were explanations to sort out what the actual achievements were of the Astronomers and the Mathematicians featured in the book, and the possibly not quite fiction of the people portrayed. The short chapters kept my interest and the writing is technically flawless as far as I could see.
The characters are brought to life by the fictional description of their home lives and loves, and the identification of their teachers and peers put the progress of discovery in some sort of historical perspective.
The use of modern language and slang was amusing used in ancient times situations but Aristotle calling Herpyllis `honey' may seem to be a bit much, but I am told by the writer that this was a term of endearment in ancient times.
My favourite chapter in the book is chapter twelve on Christopher Columbus, of whom plenty has been written over the years. This account is very different and plausible and I certainly learned some more about Columbus as he rehearses his pitch for the royal patronage, talking about instruments of celestial navigation and books written by Regiomontanus. Unfortunately in the real interview he was criticised for his questionable morals, and ripped apart on the fine details of his plan, although in the end his funding was approved.
This is a fine attempt to bring history to life, full of facts, geniuses, and discoveries, well worth a read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback