A New Kind of Bleak: Journeys through Urban Britain and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £0.91 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A New Kind of Bleak: Jour... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: 100% Money Back Guarantee. Brand New, Perfect Condition, FAST SHIPPING TO UK 4-14 business days, all other destinations please allow 8-18 business days for delivery. Over 1,000,000 customers served.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.64
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A New Kind of Bleak: Journeys Through Urban Britain Paperback – 22 Apr 2013

6 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.08
£7.31 £7.87
£12.08 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

A New Kind of Bleak: Journeys Through Urban Britain + A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain + Militant Modernism (Zero Books)
Price For All Three: £30.85

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.64
Trade in A New Kind of Bleak: Journeys Through Urban Britain for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.64, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Verso Books; 2nd Revised edition edition (22 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781680752
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781680759
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 3.5 x 21.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 333,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A humanely barbed Nikolaus Pevsner for our times ... This book should be required reading for planners, developers and architects. --Independent

Hatherley has busily constructed a cult reputation as the angry young man of architectural criticism. --Guardian

Engaging, fearless and startlingly intelligent polemicist. --Time Out

About the Author

OWEN HATHERLEY is the author of the acclaimed A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain, Uncommon and Militant Modernism. He writes regularly on architecture and popular culture in the Guardian, Building Design, Frieze and blogs on political aesthetics at nastybrutalandshort. blogspot.com.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Tarquin on 19 July 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This a superbly well written book in which Hatherley visits a series of UK cities in the manner of a 21st century Pevsner with strong hints of Meades, Priestly and Nairn, commenting with wit, disdain and sometimes pleasure on the good, the bad and the frankly awful buildings he finds. Much of the text is devoted to the badly designed, poorly specified and shoddily built - yet extremely expensive - tat that has disfigured so many cities in the last 20 - 30 years. Thatcherite greed followed by, er, Blairite greed. Will there be a Cameron-Clegg architecture? Let's hope not. Hatherley heaps derision on bar coded windows, stuck-on metal panels and the microscopic size of most new housing. He slates the sheer nastiness of the malls and the out-of-town sheds and pulls no punches when discussing who is to blame for all this. There are spirited defences, too, of the better buildings from the post war period and a passionate (sorry for the cliché) appeal to the idea of the city. How sad it is to see that the Olympic opening ceremony (always rubbish, I agree) is to represent Britain as some sort of puerile rural fantasy!
The only criticism I can make is that of the book itself. I mean here, the physical object and not the text. The pictures are atrociously printed; the paper cheap and why is it that a writer who so clearly believes in Britain as a `maker' has had his book printed in Sweden? That aside I wait eagerly for the next book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By F. Alexander on 29 Nov. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Hatherley's journeys highlight the vacuousness of much of the current British architecture and planning, but unlike some of his other writing this book more than hints at a more interesting past and possible future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By jpm on 7 July 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The theme of this book is very good. Unfortunately Hatherley is too focussed on what has gone wrong to allow him space to put forward practicable, better alternative approaches to town and city development. OK but not a crucial book for your library
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback