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New British Philosophy: The Interviews Paperback – 1 May 2002


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1st Edition edition (1 May 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415243467
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415243469
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,216,431 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Julian Baggini's books include The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, What's It All About? - Philosophy and the Meaning of Life and The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, all published by Granta Books. He writes for several newspapers and magazines and is co-founder of The Philosophers' Magazine.

Product Description

Review

'An absorbing collection of interviews with 16 of the nation's rising stars.. .A great deal of ability is on show in New British Philosophy." - The New Statesman

'There is a new diversity in British academic philosophy - it doesn't just consist of white men puffing pipes and meditating on predicate calculus, but embraces feminism, and offers new treatments of age-old questions about political obligation, aesthetics and consciousness.' - The Guardian

From the Back Cover

'Offers one a strong sense of the range and character of contemporary philosophy...I learned a lot from reading it'
Ben Rogers, Author of A.J. Ayer: A Life
'The novice will truly get a nice sense of what philosophers are doing and why they do it. There ought to be such a volume in the United States!'
Brian Leiter, University of Texas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
British philosophy has not traditionally taken much of an interest in the lives of its great figures. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Varol Akman on 2 Sep 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a very nice review of what's keeping (British) philosophers busy nowadays. It is a highly readable collection of interviews and the philosophers interviewed are all thoughtful and thought-provoking. The editors ask intelligent questions and invariably get excellent answers. My favorite interviews are those with Roger Crisp, Miranda Fricker, Tim Crane, and Simon Critchley but make no mistake: all of the interviews are first-rate.
Especially recommended for its balanced and informative approach to the issue of analytic vs. continental philosophy...
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Matthew Broome VINE VOICE on 7 May 2002
Format: Paperback
Bought this book over the bank holiday w/e and enjoyed it tremendously. Nice format with photo's and interviews which can be read independently or in sequence, with suggestions for further reading.
Help remedy the perception amongst philosophy undergrads that it is all logic, mind, language and Austin!
Baggini and Stangroom should be congratulated on their efforts to make philosophy relevant and exciting by this book (and their magazine - TPM) without dumbing such a subject down to a kind of new age self help.
Would recommend this book to anyone who has some knowledge of philosophy and particularly those who wish to study the subject as a postgrad. There is more to it than tweed suits and pipes!
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sam Nico on 15 April 2003
Format: Paperback
To read poetry is not to read ‘about’ poetry, and yet it seems that the major concerns of philosophy concern its own ‘aboutness’, like watching characters in a play looking for a plot. Clearly, even amongst the philosophers interviewed here, there exists a general objection to the professional philosopher increasing their kudos by adding their ‘bit’ to an academic structure with not much significance ensuing.
Yet when there is some discussion on subject-matter, one is left with a sense of exasperation. It may be valid philosophical speculation to analyse a concept such as vagueness, but my feeling is that the notion of the discrete is more relevant in the quantum realm where its impact is more interesting and pronounced, yet no reference is made to it. Leibniz also analysed the notion of infinitesimals in a way that led to his calculus. What exactly is to be the fruit of an entirely philosophical analysis that does not seem to extend beyond the range of an academic concern with it? Metaphysical concerns do not seem to fare much better, since (as an example) the concepts of time that are discussed seem extremely rudimentary, as if the subject is done and dusted, when in fact the subject is wide open. Post-analytic philosophy, apparently the new direction, reiterates the traditional function of philosophy as a questioner of assumptions, assumes that science is already fully questioned (while we live under the yoke of the same principles of motion that have been kept in place for the best part of 400 years), and then assumes it is its own best-placed arbiter of deciding what assumptions should be questioned in its own house. Nor is there any reference to process philosophy as a vibrant force.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Fashions in thought, not matters of moment 13 April 2003
By Sam Nico - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
To read poetry is not to read `about' poetry, and yet it seems that the major concerns of philosophy concern its own `aboutness', like watching characters in a play looking for a plot. Clearly, even amongst the philosophers interviewed here, there exists a general objection to the professional philosopher increasing their kudos by adding their `bit' to an academic structure with not much significance ensuing.
Yet when there is some discussion on subject-matter, one is left with a sense of exasperation. It may be valid philosophical speculation to analyse a concept such as vagueness, but my feeling is that the notion of the discrete is more relevant in the quantum realm where its impact is more interesting and pronounced, yet no reference is made to it. Leibniz also analysed the notion of infinitesimals in a way that led to his calculus. What exactly is to be the fruit of an entirely philosophical analysis that does not seem to extend beyond the range of an academic concern with it? Metaphysical concerns do not seem to fare much better, since (as an example) the concepts of time that are discussed seem extremely rudimentary, as if the subject is done and dusted, when in fact the subject is wide open. Post-analytic philosophy, apparently the new direction, reiterates the traditional function of philosophy as a questioner of assumptions, assumes that science is already fully questioned (while we live under the yoke of the same principles of motion that have been kept in place for the best part of 400 years), and then assumes it is its own best-placed arbiter of deciding what assumptions should be questioned in its own house. Nor is there any reference to process philosophy as a vibrant force. (Every major philosopher from the 20th century gets a mention except Whitehead!) Nor is there any reference to the current vacuum in science that is preventing progress in the quantum gravity problem and which is crying out for a greater philosophical involvement, and which is getting none. And this is the major philosophical problem of the 21st century.
Of the interviews given here, those with female philosophers were the most engaging. The later interview concerning the status of artificial intelligence was also of some merit, so perhaps it is not all doom and gloom. However, it does seem that for the most part a great deal of energy is expended in the pursuit of very little, and one is left with a sense of what is the fashion at the moment rather than what are the concerns of greatest moment and urgency. But by and large, it is a commendable read, inciting both a sense of disappointment as well as hope.
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