or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden [Mass Market Paperback]

Joanne Greenberg
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
Price: 4.16 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 15 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Book Description

17 Jun 2009
Deborah is a 16-year-old girl locked in torment within her own mind. The terrors, horrors and delusions facing Deborah as she battles with schizophrenia form the basis of this book. Doomed to the white world of the mental ward she struggles from madness to reality.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Frequently Bought Together

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden + The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness + An Unquiet Mind: A memoir of moods and madness
Price For All Three: 23.14

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; Reprint edition (17 Jun 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312943598
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312943592
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 10.6 x 16.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 124,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Author

There is no creativity in madness.
I wrote this book as a way of describing mental illness without the romanticisation that it underwent in the sixties and seventies when people were Taking LSD to stimulate what they thought was a liberating experience. During those days people often confused creativity with insanity. There is no creativity in madness; madness is the opposite of creativity, although people may be creative in spite of being mentally ill. I also wanted to steer away from melodrama, and to deal with the stigma of mental illness, but not to concentrate on it. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"Should we wait here or go in?" Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, haunting novel 13 Aug 1998
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
A beautifully written, haunting account of a young girl's confinement in a mental institution and her struggle to overcome mental illness, presumably schizophrenia. Written in the early 1960's, the book is terribly archaic in its understanding of schizophrenia, but Greenburg's prose is so bewitching and her protagonist so fascinating, that it is easy to forgive some of her misconceptions about mental illness. her construction of the main character's alternate reality is particularly brilliant, and i found the book more enjoyable when read almost as a fantasy rather than a medical case history. All in all, a powerful, albeit occasionally tedious, work of literature.
Was this review helpful to you?
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant. A classic. I couldn�t put it down. 24 May 1999
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Rarely does there come a book that transcends genre, time, and cultural barriers speaking directly to the human heart. This is one of those rare books. Rather than showing the mysterious and foreign world of insanity I had expected, it reveals that the mentally ill struggle with the same needs and battles as we all do: The need for love and acceptance, the power of undiluted truth, and of undeserved kindness and forgiveness. Comparable to victor Hugo's Les Misérables this book is not merely about a certain minority group, but about major life issues and struggles that touch us at the core of who we are, no matter what our background.
Insanity is a form of defense, a way of not seeing. Rather than offering an "alternate reality", it creates a wall that keeps out hurt, but also keeps out the love that we all need. I couldn't help but see the similarity between the hiding from life of the insane, and the hiding from life of the polite, trivial, distraction-obsessed, non-introspective world of the "normal". To live in reality is a fight for us both. It is tempting to take the easy way out for both groups, and swallowing the lies of an easy struggle-free existence is tempting, but as the main character Deborah Blau says, "To be alive is to fight". This book made me glad to be alive. Read it!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant. A classic. I couldn�t put it down. 24 May 1999
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Rarely does there come a book that transcends genre, time, and cultural barriers speaking directly to the human heart. This is one of those rare books. Rather than showing the mysterious and foreign world of insanity I had expected, it reveals that the mentally ill struggle with the same needs and battles as we all do: The need for love and acceptance, the power of undiluted truth, and of undeserved kindness and forgiveness. Comparable to victor Hugo's Les Misérables this book is not merely about a certain minority group, but about major life issues and struggles that touch us at the core of who we are, no matter what our background.
Insanity is a form of defense, a way of not seeing. Rather than offering an "alternate reality", it creates a wall that keeps out hurt, but also keeps out the love that we all need. I couldn't help but see the similarity between the hiding from life of the insane, and the hiding from life of the polite, trivial, distraction-obsessed, non-introspective world of the "normal". To live in reality is a fight for us both. It is tempting to take the easy way out for both groups, and swallowing the lies of an easy struggle-free existence is tempting, but as the main character Deborah Blau says, "To be alive is to fight". This book made me glad to be alive. Read it!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By Lola TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I found it hard to get into the book and to finish it (but I did).

Nevertheless, "I never promised you a rose garden" is a beautifully and evocatively written account of a young girl's stay in the asylum, and her struggle to overcome her demons, her mental illness (I specifically referred to "demons" as the world she imagines, the demonic universe of Yr, is haunting and disturbing and full of demons), and find a place within people, and in this world.

The book is a semi-autobiography of Joanne Greenberg, the author, and for many years was a bestseller in the States, and I can see why. Whilst the account of the mental illness might not be medically accurate, the language, the description, the narrative are all brilliant AND, what I loved, the story is full of sarcasm and self-humour, which makes the main heroine, Deborah, extremely likable. Just for the humour the book deserves another star. The structure of Deborah's alternate universe is mesmerising and absorbing, and I actually mentioned the book to the avid fantasy reader, because, in my opinion, one can easily enjoy the book as sci-fi, rather than a medical account.

I do not regret reading "I never promised you a rose garden", but I will be very careful in recommending this book. It's not for everybody. It's not for the majority.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I never promised you a rose garden 28 Oct 2011
By racs
Format:Mass Market Paperback
For anyone interested in mental health and present day treatments compared to 50/60 years ago, this is a fantastic eye-opener. Joanne Greenbergs description of her battle with mental health from an early age (although she fictionalises it) gives insight into both the cause, her treatment and her recovery. Her relationship with Dr Frieda Fromm-Reichman (her psychiatrist) is fundamental to her recovery as well as the support she receives from her family. Pity that most people suffering from psychotic episodes today are not treated in such a humanistic way. The book doesn't pull any punches about life on a psychiatric ward either.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
One to keep.
Published 11 days ago by Jacen Hedges
1.0 out of 5 stars Could not get on with this book
A friend gave me this book to borrow - as we work in a counselling setting, she thought that it may interest me. Read more
Published 21 days ago by Brida
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic look at Schizophrenia, treatments and how it affects the...
It took me quite a while to tackle this book - the first memoir of schizophrenia that I have tried. It took a little getting used to, as it absorbs you straight into the world of... Read more
Published 18 months ago by Amanda Green
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the world of Yr
A MUST READ! Definately one for the collection ...

When the doctor says "I never promised you a rose garden", you realise this isn't going to be easy!! Read more
Published 22 months ago by S. Johnson
2.0 out of 5 stars Uncertain and fantastical
I am uncertain about this book. In some aspects, I did enjoy it and found parts of it interesting - the author certainly made some good points surrounding the morals and stigma... Read more
Published on 17 Oct 2011 by Stepping Out of the Page
5.0 out of 5 stars Re-reading this
I read this book when I was 15, in 1986; I can't remember how I came to get it. But it stayed with me, all these years, despite the thousands of books I've read since. Read more
Published on 16 May 2011 by Frances
1.0 out of 5 stars DONT BOTHER
Dont buy this book. It really difficult to read as it switches between the real world and the main characters fantasy world of Yr in a really awkward and confusing way. Read more
Published on 16 Jan 2011 by Rach
5.0 out of 5 stars IT GAVE ME HOPE
THE BOOK WAS GIVEN TO ME BY A FRIEND. SHE THOUGHT IT WOULD HELP AS I HAVE SCHOZOPHRNIA. I HAVE READ IT AND RE-READ IT AND HAVE TO ADMIT I AM NOW A COMMITTED DEBORAH FAN. Read more
Published on 28 Feb 2001 by clairea@zoom.co.uk
5.0 out of 5 stars A triumph of will over the cruelest of enemies.
Few works of art have spoken to me as this book has. Through the course of story, you are shown that, truly, our most formidable opposition lies within us. Read more
Published on 4 Sep 1999
5.0 out of 5 stars The mind is a terrible thing to waste...
There are times when I would like to just go "insane" and casually strangle my annoying co-workers, but I don't. Why? Read more
Published on 22 July 1999
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback