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Nepal: True Stories of Life on the Road (Country Guides) Paperback – Aug 1997


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Product details

  • Paperback: 398 pages
  • Publisher: Travelers' Tales, Incorporated (Aug 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885211147
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885211149
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.1 x 2.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,000,776 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE WALK FROM DURBAR SQUARE, THE OLDEST PART OF TOWN, TO Thamel, the backpacker's section of Kathmandu, presents me two problems: sensory overload and the relative certainty of getting lost, not because there isn't a simple route, but because I find the temptations of detours impossible to resist. Read the first page
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 July 1998
Why is Nepal so magical that people keep on coming back ? Well, you may find the answers after reading the wonderful collection of short stories. I liked it because the stories selected were, most importantly easy to read and short enough for busy people.Inside the 5 chapters you'll find writers like Peter Matthiesen (The Snow Leopard) and Manjushree Thapa (Meanderings in Mustang), both of whom were privileged enough to enter the forbidden lands I got so close to (I only got as far in as Kagbeni,Lower Mustang !). I found Broughton Coburn's (A Nosy neighbor) account of his encounter with a leech most enlightening and amusing. Tears flowed forth after reading Robert J Matthews's (A Simple Gift) and Allan Aistrope's (Virtue's Children), if you've been there you'll know why.Having gone trekking I'd certainly put Jack Bennett's (The Art of Walking) into good use the next time. In Susan Vreeland's (Do Buddhists Cry?), you get an insight of the selflessness of the native people there and you begin to wonder if we really are the more civilized ?. I thought that the addition of short quotes and highlights from other writers added in-between and at the end of each stories were nice, as at a glance you see how others fared in similar fates. My ambitions of writing a journal of my visit is out the window - I'll just share this book to anyone who wants to know how I felt exactly when I was there.Buy this book !
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Why I'm going back there again. 7 July 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Why is Nepal so magical that people keep on coming back ? Well, you may find the answers after reading the wonderful collection of short stories. I liked it because the stories selected were, most importantly easy to read and short enough for busy people.Inside the 5 chapters you'll find writers like Peter Matthiesen (The Snow Leopard) and Manjushree Thapa (Meanderings in Mustang), both of whom were privileged enough to enter the forbidden lands I got so close to (I only got as far in as Kagbeni,Lower Mustang !). I found Broughton Coburn's (A Nosy neighbor) account of his encounter with a leech most enlightening and amusing. Tears flowed forth after reading Robert J Matthews's (A Simple Gift) and Allan Aistrope's (Virtue's Children), if you've been there you'll know why.Having gone trekking I'd certainly put Jack Bennett's (The Art of Walking) into good use the next time. In Susan Vreeland's (Do Buddhists Cry?), you get an insight of the selflessness of the native people there and you begin to wonder if we really are the more civilized ?. I thought that the addition of short quotes and highlights from other writers added in-between and at the end of each stories were nice, as at a glance you see how others fared in similar fates. My ambitions of writing a journal of my visit is out the window - I'll just share this book to anyone who wants to know how I felt exactly when I was there.Buy this book !
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Essential for anyone interested in Nepal 12 Mar 2004
By Heather Lowe - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This collection of essays and excerpts about Nepal and her people greatly exceeded my expecations. The editor displayed refreshingly high standards when it came to picking which authors to include. The writing is of high quality, and the vast range of works included gives you an thorough, unvarnished look at all aspects of life and travel in Nepal. Taken together the entries accomplish the difficult task of helping the visitor-to--be know what it will FEEL like to be there.
You just don't get this kind of stuff out of guidebooks.
The book has enhanced my trip preparations and brought my excitement about going to Nepal to a fever pitch. I highly recommend this to anyone about to make a similar journey.
I hope to find more books in this series available for all the other countries on my travel wish list.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
A great supplement to any travel book like Lonely planet! 31 July 2000
By Sara A. Abernathy - Published on Amazon.com
I loved this book, it was a great travel book. This book gave me insights into the culture and beliefs of Nepal, not just places to stay or to eat like most travel books. All of the stories were unique and made me really excited to hop on a plane and travel there. With this book I know what to expect once I get there and know enough not to offend their culture as an American.
I recommend using this to supplement a Fromer's or Lonely planet travel book.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
encompasses all the diverse aspects of Nepal 24 Oct 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Reading this book is indeed a great experience. I am really thankful that people abroad have made the effort to introduce Nepal's romantic realities to the world. I am sure that anyone who wants to know about Nepal would definitely benefit from this book. I am glad that I bought this book and learnt so much about my own country. To be honest though being a native, I was not familiar with the panoromic details about Nepal that the book has captured. After reading various tales collected in the book I am inspired to visit those beautiful places and experience the joy myself.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A charming cultural portrait of a fascinating land 23 Mar 2001
By Dr. J - Published on Amazon.com
Traveler's Tales is the postmodern guidebook. Instead of lists of iteneraries, temple admission prices and grainy photos, the authors of this book allow the reader to imagine Nepal in all of its tantalizing fullness. The excerpts selected range on topic and style, but all present unique aspects of the Nepali experience-- rural and urban, male and female, touristic and holistic. In opening the pages you can smell the spice markets, hear the chants of priests, feel the grinding poverty, inhale the crystalline Himalayan air and allow yourself to be carried down the narrow alleys of Pokhara. After reading Traveler's Tales: Nepal, I assue you you'll immediately run to Expedia to check fares to Kathmandu.
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