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Neon Lights

Simple Minds Audio CD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 7.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Music

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Biography

Simple Minds were formed in Glasgow in the late 70s by Jim Kerr and Charlie Burchill. They are best known for the track "Don't You Forget about Me", which was used in the brat pack film The Breakfast Club in 1985.

Simple Minds came from the ashes of a short-lived punk band, they developed their musical style over their first four albums, incorporating new wave, experimental ... Read more in Amazon's Simple Minds Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Neon Lights + Neapolis + Graffiti Soul
Price For All Three: 33.95

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  • Neapolis 7.99
  • Graffiti Soul 18.79

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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 May 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Eagle Rock
  • ASIN: B00005MJ8Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,883 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Gloria
2. The Man Who Sold The World
3. Homosapien
4. Dancing Barefoot
5. Neon Lights
6. Hello I Love You
7. Bring On The Dancing Horses
8. The Needle & The Damage Done
9. For Your Pleasure
10. All Tomorrow's Parties

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Neon Lights is Simple Minds' contribution to that less-than-auspicious medium: the covers album. Frankly, these projects often serve little purpose beyond announcing to all and sundry that the artist concerned has completely run out of original ideas and is utterly desperate for a hit. In fairness to Simple Minds, a whole new album of freshly composed material, Our Secrets Are the Same, has been shelved due to legal complications. And so rather than twiddle their thumbs in some recording studio, the Minds have opted to doff their caps in the direction of the art-school glum-rock heroes of their youth (Bowie, Lou Reed, The Doors, the Velvet Underground), whose material they performed years ago when they were still scrawny Glaswegian punks called "Johnny and the Self Abusers". This they now do in slightly dated techno-rock fashion, albeit without the expansive pomp and bluster of their stadium-straddling 1980's heyday. Even so, experienced in its entirety, Neon Lights is probably an expression of admiration too far--no toes are trodden on and too much respect is shown. Many of these numbers--Echo and the Bunnymen's "Bring on the Dancing Horses", David Bowie's "The Man Who Sold The World"--are identikit presentations, while electro-rock assaults on Them's "Gloria" and The Doors "Hello I Love You" are monotonous and misguided. A really interesting revision of Pete Shelley's ambiguous "Homo sapien"--on which Jim Kerr almost sounds like a pervy gentlemen's outfitter--and a faithful, powerful reading of the Velvet Undergrounds' "All Tomorrow's Parties" fair much better but, overall, the place for these kind of tributes is the sanctuary of the B-side or that must-have Fan Club only exclusive. --Kevin Maidment

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
3.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
Having been an avid fan since the early 80's a new release from Simple Minds has always been eagerly anticipated. That said not all their albums have struck a chord and it was with interest that I listened to Neon Lights for the first time. The Dancing Barefoot E.P had set the scene with classic tracks like Being Boiled (Human League) getting the Minds treatment.
Neon Lights is a tribute to the many and varied influences of Simple Minds and is their fisrt studio release since Neapolis in 1998. The album contains tracks originally crafted by acts as diverse as Echo and the Bunnymen and Patti Smith.
The mix of sequencers and guitar combine to produce an up to date feel whilst retaining that certain Simple Minds ambience that is always present in their strongest work, (New Gold Dream, Sparkle in the Rain). This is a real grower, always a good sign, although I suspect it will be largely ignored by the masses. A shame really because it heralds a welcome return to form and hopefully an insight into the style of future new material.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty dreary covers album with (very) odd gem! 28 Dec 2012
Format:Audio CD
Now I'm a big fan of covers albums (just look at my other reviews) and while some are brilliant (Rage Against the Machine's "Renegades", Metallica's "Garage Inc", Patti Smith's "Twelve") and some are utterly terrible (Six Feet Under, Duran Duran) this falls somewhere between the two. With a very electronic sound removed from the big guitar anthems most associate them with, and back to their minimal synth-based roots, these are very different interpretations of some well-known tracks with the odd curveball. When it works - such as the dark lullaby of Neil Young's "Needle & the Damage Done", a faithful interpretation of Patti Smith's "Dancing Barefoot", electro-fied take on The Doors "Hello I Love You" and synth contemporaies Human League's "Being Boiled" - it's really rather good, if not what you may have been expecting. However, when it's bad...It opens with a pop-dance version of Van Morrison's "Gloria" that sounds like Fatboy Slim or Bentley Rhythm Ace; Bowie's "The Man Who Sold the World" is good, but not a patch on Nirvana; Roxy's "For Your Pleasure" is unrecognisable, and as for "Love Will Tear Us Apart", stripped of the passion, emotion, pathos and feel of the original (coming off like something tossed out by German Eurodancers Cascada) it leaves a very bad taste in the mouth as this largely enjoyable album finishes.
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16 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fun curiosity (U.S. version) 17 Oct 2001
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
I found this CD in a used shop in New York weeks before its U.S. release (not a good sign). I bought it solely as a curiosity, and would probably have never taken a risk at full price for two reasons. For one, covers albums, while they can sometimes be creative in their song selection and approach (listen to The Church's A BOX OF BIRDS or Bowie's PIN-UPS), are generally unnecessary, especially if the songs are very well known and don't lend themselves well to the particular artist (listen to Duran Duran's THANK YOU). One glance at the track listing of NEON LIGHTS, and you can see that Simple Minds has unfortunately decided to drag out the old warhorses like GLORIA, when they should have dug deeper into their record collection.
The second problem is, Simple Minds' quality control has been lacking since - let's be honest - SPARKLE IN THE RAIN. Despite Jim Kerr's negative comments about "Don't You Forget About Me," he and his band have been trying hard ever since to try to recapture commercial glory by hopping on the latest pop music fad (and sometimes a few years too late). On NEON LIGHTS, it seems that the Minds have been listening to their kids' house and techno records, and have created quite awful dance versions of the aforementioned GLORIA, HELLO, I LOVE YOU and LOVE WILL TEAR US APART. Kerr even resorts to a Cher-type vocal distortion trick on BEING BOILED that's downright embarassing.
It's also no surprise that the Minds would cover Bowie, but why choose THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD? Nirvana's version of this song will be the definitive version for years to come - so much so that Bowie himself dragged it out of mothballs. But the Minds add absolutely nothing new to the song.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Covers All That Have All Been Done Better Elsewhere 25 April 2006
Format:Audio CD
The trouble with this album is that most of the tracks have been covered better by other artists, The man who sold the world (Nirvana), Hello I Love You (The Cure), All tomorrows parties (Japan), Dancing Barefoot (The Mission, U2). To date I can't think of one cover that Simple Minds have done well. The god awful version of 'Sign O The Times' by Prince should have sent alarm bells ringing.

I loved Simple Minds output between 81 - 85 but sadly when the decade came to an end, while contemporaries U2 dropped of the radar to re-invent themselves, Simple Minds released the overblown and pretentious pub rock album that was 'Street Fighting Years' and they never really recovered. Jim Kerr's voice suddenly became reminiscent of the pub singing lampooned by Vic Reeves.

The only saving grace this album has is that 'The man who sold the world' stays true to the original / Nirvana version and 'Bring on the dancing horses' is ok'ish when it gets going but not a patch on the Bunnymen original. I love Roxy music but from Simple Minds cover of ' For your pleasure' I couldn't remember how the original sounded.

The Eagle record label seems to be a haven for artists who's time has come and gone. Sadly I think this is the case for Simple Minds. Thanks for the eighties lads but this album sums up their career at present, devoid of hits and guitars.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All Tomorrow's Parties. 10 Nov 2001
By Jason Stein - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
As far as cover albums go Simple Minds' "Neon Lights" is pretty decent. Their choice of material is great, though some would want more obscure song selection. So, what a cover album boils down to is how the songs are covered. Despite what the other reviewers have said, I think Simple Minds' do a fine job of covering. Van Morrison's "Gloria" leads off the cd, and the Minds update it with a techno beat but still keep the song sounding much as it did in the past. I prefer an artist to put their touch on a cover not mutilate beyond recognition. Playing to their strengths, a cover of Bowie's "The Man Who Sold The World" comes off very nicely. An interesting choice is Pete Shelley's "Homosapien" with its sly references to homosexuality--not a song I thought the Minds would cover, but they slow it down and make it hypnotic. Patti Smith's "Danicing Barefoot" is another Simple Minds strength and it sounds just as good as U2's cover. Now I prefer OMD's cover of Kraftwerk's "Neon Lights" over Simple Minds' but they do a decent cover of it. One of the more unusual moments on the disc is the cover of The Doors "Hello I Love You". The Minds take it to a techno, post modern level and I think Jim Morrison would be amused. Yet another gem is the cover of Echo & The Bunnymen's "Bring On The Dancing Horses". Here, the Minds do an excellent rendition, and it may be one of the best songs on the disc. A depressive, morbid cover of Neil Young's "The Needle & The Damage Done" is haunting, and Simple Minds turn in another solid performance here. My least favorite cover is Roxy Music's "For Your Pleasure". This definitely is not the best Simple Minds can do, and I think it's the weakest song on the cd. The last three songs finish the cd in high form. A cover of The Velvet Underground's "All Tomorrow's Parties" is well done, followed by an excellent cover of Human League's "Being Boiled". Here, I think Simple Minds have found their calling! I like Human League's version, but Simple Minds make a nice go of it that could easily be compared to the original. Finally, a cover of "Love Will Tear Us Apart" end the disc on a strangely upbeat note because Joy Division's version isn't. I also like Paul Young's cover of this song on his 1983 disc "No Parlez", but Simple Minds put in a spirited dance version of the track. All in all, a solid cover album compared to most. I don't know why people didn't feel that this disc was very good, we all like Simple Minds, or have been a fan of their work, and I can refer back to their first four albums as being less well made than this disc.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Old material in a new light 12 Nov 2001
By Philip J Halpin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Bit of an oddity this one! Not a bad album by any stretch of the imagination but still "only a covers album" at it's core hence any chance of song writing originality is limited straight away. Some of the tracks stand out and show what kind of a band SM can be when they put their mind to it. "Dancing Barefoot", "Bring on the Dancing Horses" and "All Tomorrows Parties" make the album worthwhile. Unfortunately some of the other tracks lend a weakness to the project which cannot be masked, namely the Minds version of Joy Divisions' "Love Will Tear Us Apart" which seems to have been added as an afterthought and does not gel very well with the proceeding tracks. It's true that the Neapolis influence is felt in a lot of the covers, semi-techno beats and distorted vocals but considering the cover material this actually proves to be effective and brings something new to each of the now familiar tracks. Their rendition of Pete Shelley's "Homosapien" is a case in point. Still, as the note on the inside cover clearly states, the Minds wanted to experience life as a covers band once more. This is fine provided new material, which shows how original this band can be, is just around the corner. Go on, give it a listen.....
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fun curiosity 1 Nov 2001
By cdominey@mediaone.net - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I found this CD in a used shop in New York weeks before its U.S. release (not a good sign). I bought it solely as a curiosity, and would probably have never taken a risk at full price for two reasons. For one, covers albums, while they can sometimes be creative in their song selection and approach (listen to The Church's A BOX OF BIRDS or Bowie's PIN-UPS), are generally unnecessary, especially if the songs are very well known and don't lend themselves well to the particular artist (listen to Duran Duran's THANK YOU). One glance at the track listing of NEON LIGHTS, and you can see that Simple Minds has unfortunately decided to drag out the old warhorses like GLORIA, when they should have dug deeper into their record collection.
The second problem is, Simple Minds' quality control has been lacking since - let's be honest - SPARKLE IN THE RAIN. Despite Jim Kerr's negative comments about "Don't You Forget About Me," he and his band have been trying hard ever since to try to recapture commercial glory by hopping on the latest pop music fad (and sometimes a few years too late). On NEON LIGHTS, it seems that the Minds have been listening to their kids' house and techno records, and have created quite awful dance versions of the aforementioned GLORIA, HELLO, I LOVE YOU and LOVE WILL TEAR US APART. Kerr even resorts to a Cher-type vocal distortion trick on BEING BOILED that's downright embarassing.
It's also no surprise that the Minds would cover Bowie, but why choose THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD? Nirvana's version of this song will be the definitive version for years to come - so much so that Bowie himself dragged it out of mothballs on his subsequent tours. But the Minds add absolutely nothing new to the song.
But like the rest of their late 80s and 1990s albums, there are moments on NEON LIGHTS when you are suddenly reminded of the ethereal and uplifting band the Minds used to be. Their version of ALL TOMORROW'S PARTIES, in particular, is quite powerful, with Kerr's soaring vocals the strongest I've heard in years. Their hushed, accoustic version of FOR YOUR PLEASURE should please Mr. Bryan Ferry, while the emotional DANCING BAREFOOT is far superior to - dare I say it? - U2's stadium rock version.
And for a good chuckle, listen to their techno-lite version of Echo and the Bunnymen's BRING ON THE DANCING HORSES, and marvel at Kerr's dead-on impersonation of Ian McCulloch.
So taken on its own merits, NEON LIGHTS is a pleasant enough diversion as we await new material. But this fan hopes the Minds have one more NEW GOLD DREAM or SPARKLE IN THE RAIN left in them (I've heard NEAPOLIS praised as such, but it wasn't released here). Perhaps it's unrealistic to expect your favorite musicians to live up to their glory days as they enter middle age. But as their 80s counterparts U2, The Church and Echo and the Bunnymen have shown lately, it is possible to produce strong and creative material years later while retaining the sound that made you famous. Let's hope the Minds will follow suit.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple Minds pays tribute to their influences 19 Oct 2005
By William M. Dalton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Simple Minds doing Covers ?

The fact that this cd is Simple Minds doing covers is enough to buy it .

This cd is in limited editions and won't be around for ever.

Songs like "Homosapien","All tomorrow's parties","dancing Barefoot","being boiled" and the non vocal "love will tare us apart' are great.

Remeber their earlier cd "Simple Minds the early years" was a limited pressing too. That cd has long been out of print and is very had to get today.

If you are a Simple Minds fan it is a rare gem to your collection.

If you like to hear bands do covers then this cd is for you too.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Weird Truimph 17 Nov 2001
By WrtnWrd - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Cover records are nearly as disposable as live releases. There's a sense of diminished expectations before you even play the damn thing. Add to that a band's checkered history, and you have the non-event of Simple Minds' Neon Lights. Expectations are made to be confounded, and Neon Lights is a weird triumph, from its mix of the obvious (Bowie's "The Man Who Sold the World", Echo's "Bring on the Dancing Horses") to the obscure (Roxy Music's "For Your Pleasure", the Human League's "Being Boiled"). You hear love and care in these songs, though Siimple Minds don't make the mistake of being slavish. ("Love Will Tear Us Apart" is a house remix!) The songs that seem the oddest fits are best: the Velvet Underground's "All Tomorrow Parties", Neil Young's "The Needle & the Damage Done", Kraftwerk's title track. The songs closest to their new wave heart are rethought, re-explored. Pete Shelley's "Homosapien" - once a cruiser's command - is now a slinky seduction. The Doors' "Hello I Love You", I song I've always hated, is a sexy Goth delight. And let it be officially told: no matter how hard you try, Patti Smith's "Dancing Barefoot" is impossible to ruin.
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