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Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen Hardcover – 24 Sep 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Viking; First Edition edition (24 Sept. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670869988
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670869985
  • Product Dimensions: 23.7 x 2.4 x 16.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 490,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Joyce Tyldesley was born in Bolton, Lancashire. She studied archaeology at Liverpool and Oxford Universities, before writing a series of academic yet accessible books on ancient Egypt, including several books for children. Her 2008 book Cleopatra: Egypt's Last Queen was a Radio 4 "Book of the Week". Her 2012 book Tutankhamen's Curse (published as Tutankhamen in the USA), won the Felicia A. Holton Book Award of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Having taught prehistory at Liverpool University, Joyce currently teaches students througout the world on the innovative on-line Certificate and Diploma Courses in Egyptology, plus a series of Short Courses in Egyptology, at Manchester University.

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Review

'As a thoughtful, lucid report on the latest... evidence of Akhenaten's reign, Tyldesley's 'biography' is to be welcomed' -- Literary Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Joyce Tyldesley was born in Bolton, Lancashire. She gained a first-class honours degree in archaeology from Liverpool University and a doctorate from Oxford. She is now Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics and Oriental Studies at Liverpool University and a freelance writer and lecturer on Egyptian archaeology. Her most recent book, Pyramids, the real story behind Egypt's most ancient monuments was published to much acclaim. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Once upon a time, a long time ago in a far-away land, the king of the gods. Read the first page
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
Tyldesley has scored another triumph in her series of biographies of famous Ancient Egyptians. Nefertiti is not a subject many people would tackle with such confidence and ability - Tyldesley obviously keeps abreast of the latest scholarship on the Amarna Period and its convolutions, but she has such an approachable style she conveys even difficult information in a way any reader can understand.
There are so many weird and wacky books on the Amarna Period it was a real pleasure to read one written by an author who takes such a well-balanced approach. You feel that you are reading the considered view of a writer who isn't pushing you to believe their latest oddball theory but has the confidence to show you all the evidence for you to make up your own mind.
If this makes it sound like a dry textbook it isn't! I reckon this is a cracking book for both university students and the interested amateur like me!) alike.
More please!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
Joyce Tyldeseley is a very well known author in the archaeological circles. When you're reading this, you can be sure that you're reading current, real, scholarly archaeological thoughts on the subject, and not some of the more fantastical hypotheses which are abounding at the moment.
The unfortunate thing is that most of the other glitzy books out there are larger because of irrelevant padding, or wild hypotheses. This is because there's not a lot known about Nefertiti. What information exists is presented very well, and very logically in this book.
Because so little is known, the actual story, end-to-end, would fit into only one, or at most, two chapters, so this book gives (as has been pointed out already) a good beginner's guide to the "Amarna Period", a segment of Egypt's history where a rogue pharaoh tried to overturn the existing dogma, art and culture, within which nefertiti was a major player.
I've read a great many books on this subject, and this is the best for the beginner. However, if you're looking for much more information, seek out the larger Akhenaten-based hardbacks.
I only give it four stars, because I know of many more illustrations which would have worked well in the book, and there are some important artifacts, as well as some other researchers' opinions which are either glossed over, or omitted.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 3 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
Joyce Tyldesley's book, 'Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen' is a fascinating study of a very important but mostly misunderstood figure in Egyptian history. Perhaps it was due to the confusion of names (another queen, Nefertari, is popularly known due to the use of her name in Biblical epic films), and largely historically due to Nerfertiti's marriage to Akhenaton, a pharoah who was almost erased from history.
Akhenaton was a heretic in Egyptian terms -- he renounced the worship of old gods in favour of a more monotheistic framework based upon a sun-worship (Aton) which prompted him to change his name (he had been Amenhotep IV). He built a new capital city at Amarna, where he and Nefertiti lived and raised their children. Nefertiti was perhaps the most influential person on Akhenaton, at that time one of the most powerful rulers on earth.
Very little is known of Nefertiti -- her death is not recorded, and her tomb has not been found. Her beauty is renowned from the masks found at Amarna by archaeologists early in this century, having been lost for millenia. It is unusual that such a prominent person's death would not be recorded in the culture of Egypt, symbolised to this day by the monuments to the great who have died in pyramids and tombs.
The mystery deepens, however, with the discovery of stelae at Amarna that shows Nefertiti in glorious array while her husband the Pharoah occupies a lesser position.
'The Berlin stela provides us with the image of a perfect and semi-divine family inhabiting an ideal world far beyond the experiences of most Egyptians. The exact roles played by the principal members of this family are unclear.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By eric.secker@ecng.co.uk on 6 Sept. 2000
Format: Paperback
I realise it's difficult to write a biography of someone for whom there's virtually no documentary evidence, but that's no reason for Joyce Tyldesley to have written such a mediocre book on Nefertiti - especially in 1999.
Understandably there's very little on Nefertiti here - it's really a beginner's guide to the Armana period in Egyptian history.
People interested in Nefertiti will find all the information in this book re-interpreted, re-examined, brought up to date, put into context and brilliantly argued plus a lot, lot more in Christine El Mahdy's Tutankhamen - a book that makes reading Joyce Tyldesley's redundant.
There's nothing new here - and there's none of the fascinating archeological argument and counter-argument that makes El Mahdy's book so enjoyable.
Having said that, if you know absolutely nothing about Nefertiti, this is (I guess) as good a place to start as any.
But I guarantee you'll enjoy Christine El Mahdy's book more - even though it's called Tutankhamen, it's a far, far better study of Nefertiti's life and times.
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